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עמוד בית
Tue, 23.07.24

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February 2019
Jonathan Kuten MD MHA, Nicola J. Mabjeesh MD PhD, Hedva Lerman MD, Charles Levine MD, Sophie Barnes MD and Einat Even-Sapir MD PhD

Background: Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (Ga-PSMA PET/CT) is part of the initial workup of patients with intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer provided by the Israeli national health services.

Objectives: To assess the incidence of metastatic spread in consecutive patients with newly diagnosed cancer, and the potential added value of Ga-PSMA PET/CT to the staging imaging algorithm.

Methods: Patients with newly diagnosed intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer were referred for initial staging by Ga-PSMA PET/CT between May 2016 and April 2017. Blood prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, clinical history, imaging reports and histopathological reports (including Gleason scores) were obtained. Maximal standardized uptake values (SUVmax) were determined for the primary lesions detected within the prostate.

Results: The study included 137 consecutive patients with intermediate- and high-risk disease who underwent Ga-PSMA PET/CT staging. Of these, 75 had Ga-PSMA uptake in both prostate lobes, 57 had unilateral uptake, and 5 patients had no uptake. SUVmax in the primary tumor correlated significantly with PSA levels. Thirty-five patients had increased uptake compatible with metastatic disease involving lymph nodes, bone, and viscera. Twenty-seven patients had available bone scintigraphy results: 18 (69%) of their 26 bone metastases detected by Ga-PSMA PET/CT were missed on bone scintigraphy.

Conclusions: Ga-PSMA PET/CT shows promise as a sole whole-body imaging modality for assessing the presence of soft tissue and bone metastases in the setting of prostate cancer.

October 2017
Ron Sela MD, Mark Gellerman MD, Shaul Atar MD, and Eli Kalfon MD
March 2015
Olga Reitblat MD, Tsahi T. Lerman MD, Olga Grisko MD, Anna Gelfand MD, Azaria Simonovich MD, Galina Novokhatko MD, Doron Zamir MD and Tatiana Reitblat MD
August 2014
February 2006
A. Peretz, H. Checkoway, J.D. Kaufman, I. Trajber and Y. Lerman

Evidence that crystalline silica is associated with an increased rate of lung cancer led the International Agency for Research on Cancer to conclude in 1997 that crystalline silica is a known human carcinogen. In Israel too, crystalline silica is considered as such. The decision raised a debate in the scientific arena, and a few scientists have questioned the basis upon which causality was determined. We review the literature regarding the level of evidence of crystalline silica carcinogenicity.

October 2005
S. Yust-Katz, M. Katz-Leurer, L. Katz, Y. Lerman, K. Slutzki and A. Ohry.
 Background: Population structures are changing across the western world, with particularly rapid growth in the number of very old people. Life expectancy has been increasing gradually over years, resulting in a larger subpopulation of people aged 90 and over.

Objectives: To describe the sociodemographic, medical and functional characteristics of people aged 80–90 and 90+ who were admitted to a sub-acute geriatric hospital and to compare the hospitalization outcomes between these subgroups.

Methods: We compared the demographic and clinical data (extracted by means of chart review) of two groups of elderly who were admitted to the Reuth Medical Center during 2001–2002: those aged 90+ and those 80–89. Among survivors, the main outcome measures at discharge were mortality rate, functional ability, and place of residence.

Results: The study included 108 patients who were admitted to different divisions of Reuth: 55 patients aged 90+ and 53 aged 80–90. The mortality rate was significantly elevated in the older age group (49.1% vs. 28.1% in the younger age group) on multivariate analysis. The most important prognostic factors for mortality were incontinence (odds ratio 3.45) and being dependent before admission (OR[1] 4.76). Among survivors an association was found between being incontinent and dependent before hospitalization, and being dependent on discharge.

Conclusions: The main prognostic factors for mortality and functional outcome in patients admitted to a non-acute geriatric hospital are incontinence and functional state prior to admission, and not age per se.

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[1] OR = odds ratio

April 2004
O. Yanay, T. Lerman-Sagie, E. Gilad, A. Nissenkorn, J. Jaferi, N. Watemberg and S. Houri
June 2003
D. Lev, I. Binson, A.J.H. Foldes, N. Waternberg and T. Lerman-Sagie

Background: The osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe juvenile-onset osteoporosis and congenital or early-onset blindness. Other manifestations include muscular hypotonia, ligamentous laxity, mild mental retardation and seizures. The gene responsible was recently identified to be the low density lipoprotein receptor-related family member LRP5 on chromosome 11q11-12.

Objective: To measure bone density in two siblings with the OPPG[1] syndrome as well as in their family members (parents and siblings).

Methods: Bone mineral density was determined in the lumbar spine (antero-posterior), femoral neck, two-thirds distal forearm (>95% cortical bone) and ultradistal forearm (predominantly trabecular bone) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

Results: The studies revealed osteoporotic changes both in the patients and the carriers.

Conclusion: The findings demonstrate that OPPG carriers have reduced bone mass, which is a risk factor for development of early osteoporotic changes.

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[1] OPPG = osteoporosis-pseudoglioma


May 2001
March 2001
Elizabeth Fireman, MD, Mordechai R. Kramer, MD, Nathan Kaufman, MD, Joachin Muller-Quernheim, MD and Yehuda Lerman, MD, MPH
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