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עמוד בית
Wed, 29.05.24

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April 2024
Kassem Sharif MD, Adi Lahat MD, Yonatan Shneor Patt MD, Niv Ben-Shabat MD, Mahmud Omar MD, Abdulla Watad MD, Howard Amital MD MHA, Omer Gendelman MD

Background: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are chronic conditions with overlapping pathogenic mechanisms. The genetic predisposition and inflammatory pathways common to both diseases suggest a syndemic relationship. While some evidence points to a connection between the two conditions, other reports do not support this link.

Objectives: To investigate the association between AS and the subsequent incidence of IBD. To identify potential risk factors and effect modifiers that contribute to this relationship.

Methods: Utilizing the Chronic Disease Registry of Clalit Health Services, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of individuals diagnosed with AS between January 2002 and December 2018. We compared these patients with age- and sex-matched controls, excluding those with a prior diagnosis of IBD. Statistical analyses included chi-square and t-tests for demographic comparisons, and Cox proportional hazards models for evaluating the risk of IBD development, with adjustments for various co-morbidities and demographic factors.

Results: The study included 5825 AS patients and 28,356 controls. AS patients demonstrated a significantly higher incidence of IBD with hazard ratios of 6.09 for Crohn's disease and 2.31 for ulcerative colitis, after multivariate adjustment. The overall incidence of IBD in the AS cohort was significantly higher compared to controls.

Conclusions: AS patients exhibit a markedly increased risk of developing IBD. These findings advocate for heightened clinical vigilance for IBD symptoms in AS patients and suggest the need for a multidisciplinary approach to patient care. Further research into the shared pathogenic pathways is needed to develop personalized treatment strategies and improve patient management.

August 2023
Michal M. Amitai MD, Nadin Kanaan MD, Shelly Soffer MD, Lee Alper, Noa Rozendorn MD, Daniel Jacob Harrington, Uri Kopylov MD, Adi Lahat MD, Doron Yablecovitch MD, Rami Eliakim MD, Shomron Ben-Horin MD, Eyal Klang MD

Background: Jejunal disease is associated with worse prognosis in Crohn's disease. The added value of diffusion weighted imaging for evaluating jejunal inflammation related to Crohn's Disease is scarce.

Objectives: To compare diffusion weighted imaging, video capsule endoscopy, and inflammatory biomarkers in the assessment of Crohn's disease involving the jejunum.

Methods: Crohn's disease patients in clinical remission were prospectively recruited and underwent magnetic resonance (MR)-enterography and video capsule endoscopy. C-reactive protein and fecal-calprotectin levels were obtained. MR-enterography images were evaluated for restricted diffusion, and apparent diffusion coefficient values were measured. The video capsule endoscopy-based Lewis score was calculated. Associations between diffusion weighted imaging, apparent diffusion coefficient, Lewis score, and inflammatory biomarkers were evaluated.

Results: The study included 51 patients, and 27/51 (52.9%) with video capsule endoscopies showed jejunal mucosal inflammation. Sensitivity and specificity of restricted diffusion for video capsule endoscopy mucosal inflammation were 59.3% and 37.5% for the first reader, and 66.7% and 37.5% for the second reader, respectively. Diffusion weighted imaging was not statistically associated with jejunal video capsule endoscopy inflammation (P = 0.813).

Conclusions: Diffusion weighted imaging was not an effective test for evaluation of jejunal inflammation as seen by video capsule endoscopy in patients with quiescent Crohn's disease.

May 2023
Aviv Schupper MD, Galia Barash MD, Lilach Benyamini MD, Revital Ben-Haim MD, Eli Heyman MD, Eli Lahat MD, Haim Bassan MD

Global developmental delay (GDD), defined as a significant delay in two or more developmental domains (e.g., gross/fine motor, cognitive, speech/language, personal/social, activities of daily living), affects 1–3% of children. According to the Israeli Ministry of Health, thyroid function studies are not indicated in children with GDD unless there are systemic features suggestive of thyroid dysfunction (https://www.health.gov.il/hozer/mr36_2012.pdf). This approach also exists in other countries with newborn screening programs for congenital hypothyroidism.

We present the case of an infant with GDD, who despite normal newborn screening tests, underwent a repeated extended thyroid function analysis (including T3 levels) leading to a diagnosis of Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome, a rare genetic neurodevelopmental syndrome.

January 2021
Doron Boltin MBBS, Zaza Beniashvili MD, Adi Lahat MD, Jonathan Hirsch MD, Olga P. Nyssen MD, Francis Mégraud MD, Colm O'Morain MBBS, Javier P. Gisbert MD, and Yaron Niv MD

Background: The antibiotic resistance profile of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is constantly changing. Up-to-date and reliable data for the effectiveness of first-line H. pylori treatment protocols are necessary to provide evidence-based best-practice guidelines.

Objectives: To determine the effectiveness, compliance and safety of first-line treatment for H. pylori in Israel.

Methods: An observational, prospective, multicenter study was conducted in tertiary referral centers in Israel, as part of the European registry on H. pylori management (Hp-EuReg). H. pylori-infected patients were included from 2013 to March 2020. Data collected included demographics, clinical data, diagnostic tests, previous eradication attempts, current treatment, compliance, adverse events, and treatment outcome result.

Results: In total, 242 patients were registered, including 121 (50%) who received first-line therapy, 41% of these individuals received clarithromycin based triple therapy and 58.9% received a four-drug regimen. The overall effectiveness of first-line therapy was 85% and 86% by modified intention-to-treat and per protocol analyses, respectively. The effectiveness of both sequential and concomitant therapies was 100% while clarithromycin-based triple therapy achieved an eradication rate of 79%. Treatment eradication was higher among patients who received high dose proton pump inhibitor (PPI) compared to those treated with low dose PPI (100% vs. 81.5% respectively, P < 0.01). No difference in treatment effectiveness was found between 7-, 10-, and 14-day treatment.

Conclusions: The effectiveness of clarithromycin-based triple therapy is suboptimal. First-line treatment of H. pylori infection should consist of four drugs, including high dose PPI, according to international guidelines.

June 2020
Lior Orbach MD, Ido Nachmany MD, Yaacov Goykhman MD, Guy Lahat MD, Ofer Yossepowitch MD, Avi Beri MD, Yanai Ben-Gal MD, Joseph M. Klausner MD and Nir Lubezky MD

Background: Abdominal tumors invading the inferior vena cava (IVC) present significant challenges to surgeons and oncologists.

Objectives: To describe a surgical approach and patient outcomes.

Methods: The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of surgically resected tumors with IVC involvement by direct tumor encasement or intravascular tumor growth. Patients were classified according to level of IVC involvement, presence of intravascular tumor thrombus, and presence of hepatic parenchymal involvement.

Results: Study patients presented with leiomyosarcomas (n=5), renal cell carcinoma (n=7), hepatocellular carcinoma (n=1), cholangiocarcinoma (n=2), Wilms tumor (n=1), neuroblastoma (n=1), endometrial leiomyomatosis (n=1), adrenocortical carcinoma (n=1), and paraganglioma (n=1). The surgeries were conducted between 2010 and 2019. Extension of tumor thrombus above the hepatic veins required a venovenous bypass (n=3) or a full cardiac bypass (n=1). Hepatic parenchymal involvement required total hepatic vascular isolation with in situ hepatic perfusion and cooling (n=3). Circular resection of IVC was performed in five cases. Six patients had early postoperative complications, and the 90-day mortality rate was 10%. Twelve patients were alive, and six were disease-free after a mean follow-up of 1.6 years.

Conclusions: Surgical resection of abdominal tumors with IVC involvement can be performed in selected patients with acceptable morbidity and mortality. Careful patient selection, and multidisciplinary involvement in preoperative planning are key for optimal outcome.

January 2020
Danit Dayan MD, Subhi Abu-Abeid MD, Joseph Kuriansky MD, Guy Lahat MD and Boaz Sagie MD

Background: Primary retroperitoneal neoplasms (PRN) arise from diverse retroperitoneal tissues. Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) comprise the majority and are well studied. Other non-sarcomatous PRN are very rare and less familiar.

Objectives: To evaluate the clinicopathologic and radiologic features of non-sarcomatous PRN, as well as the outcome of complete tumor resection (TR).

Methods: Retrospective data were collected on consecutive patients (June 2006 to January 2015) who underwent resection of retroperitoneal lesions at our department. Final pathology of non-sarcomatous PRN was included.

Results: The study population included 36 patients (26% with PRN). PRN were neurogenic (17%), fat-containing (3%), and cystic (6%). The preoperative diagnosis was correct in only 28%. All patients underwent TR via laparotomy (72%) or laparoscopy (28%), for mean operative time of 120 ± 46 minutes. En bloc organ resection was performed in 11%. Complete TR was achieved in 97%. Intra-operative spillage occurred in 8%. Intra-operative, 90-day postoperative complications, and mortality rates were 11%, 36%, and 0%, respectively. The mean length of stay was 6.5 ± 5.5 days. The median overall survival was 53 ± 4.9 months.

Conclusions: Familiarity with radiologic characteristics of PRN is important for appropriate management. Counter to STS, other PRN are mostly benign and have an indolent course. Radical surgery is not required, as complete TR confers good prognosis. Expectant management is reserved for small, asymptomatic, benign neoplasms.

October 2017
Efraim Siegler MD, Maayan Shiner PhD, Yakir Segev MD, Lena Mackuli MD, Nitza Lahat MD and Ofer Lavie MD

Background: Invasive cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV).

Objectives: To describe the prevalence and genotype distribution of HPV types in women at risk for cervical neoplasia.

Methods: Our study summarized HPV types detected in 6654 samples that were sent to the serology laboratory from cervical clinics in northern Israel between 2006–2014. The HPV test was performed during investigation of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) results on Pap tests or due to complaints suggestive of cervical neoplasia. HPV types were classified as high risk (HPV-HR) and low risk (HPV-LR).

Results: Of the samples, 46.4% (3085/6654) were HPV-HR positive. Of women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2-3 (CIN 2-3) or cancer, 292/318 (91.8%) and 137/145 (94.5%), respectively, were HPV-HR positive. HPV 16 and HPV 18 were detected in 11.8% of the total samples and in 48.2% and 64.9% of the women with CIN 2-3 and with cancer, respectively. HPV was negative in 8/145 (5.5%) and 26/318 (8.2%) of women with cervical cancer and CIN 2-3, respectively.

Conclusions: This study shows the prevalence of HPV types in women at risk for cervical neoplasia. The sensitivity of all HPV types for CIN 2-3 and cervical cancer was 91.8% and 94.5%, respectively; and of HPV-HR types, 89% and 92.4%, respectively. Triage of HPV-HR types should be considered in women with ASCUS because HPV-HR types were discovered in only 36.7%. The distribution of HPV types in our population is similar to that reported for other developed countries.

 

 

December 2015
Abdulla Watad MD, Qasim Odeh MD, Nora Balint Lahat MD and Howard Amital MD MHA
January 2015
Yaniv Berger MD, Riccardo A Superina MD, Andrew P. Zbar MD, Nora Balint-Lahat MD, Nir Horesh MD and Ron Bilik MD

Background: Congenital hepatic hilar cysts are rare. Some are simple and do not require intervention, but some biliary cystic malformations impose the risk of morbidity and mortality. Objectives: To assess a series of five patients presenting with congenital hepatic hilar cysts. 

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all cases presenting to our pediatric surgical service between January 2010 and December 2012 and found to have a congenital hepatic hilar cyst. Data regarding clinical, radiological, operative and pathological features were analyzed.

Results: Five children with congenital cyst of the hepatic hilum were identified; four of them were diagnosed prenatally. Four children had undergone surgical intervention: one with intrahepatic choledochal cyst, one with epidermoid cyst, and two with biliary atresia and an associated cyst of the common bile duct. In another case of choledochal cyst the treatment was conservative. All children except one had a good prognosis; one child with biliary atresia required liver transplantation.

Conclusions: The differential diagnosis of congenital hepatic hilar cyst includes a broad spectrum of pathologies. It is essential to diagnose biliary atresia as early as possible. Signs such as smaller cysts in association with a hypoplastic gallbladder and direct hyperbilirubinemia may be suggestive of biliary atresia.

September 2011
E. Lahat, E. Heyman, A. Livne, M. Goldman, M. Berkovitch and D. Zachor

Background: Several studies have suggested that iron deficiency may be related to the pathophysiology of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) due to the role of iron in the production of dopamine and noradrenaline.

Objectives: To evaluate the status of iron deficiency in ADHD children, using ferritin levels, a reliable measure of iron storage in body tissue, as an iron status marker, and to investigate a possible correlation between ferritin levels and the diagnosis of ADHD.

Methods: The study group included 113 newly referred ADHD children aged 5–15 years (mean age 8.8 ± 2.7).

Results: Ferritin levels were below 20 ng/ml in 67 children (59%) and above 20 ng/ml in 45 (41%). There was a very low inverse statistical correlation between scores on Conners’ Rating Scale and ferritin levels, probably without clinical significance. 

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that low iron stores may be related to ADHD pathophysiology; therefore, ferritin should be included in the overall evaluation of children with ADHD.

 
 

May 2011
G. Lahat, N. Lubezky, M. Ben Haim, I. Nachmany, A. Blachar, I. Santo, R. Nakache and J.M. Klausner
March 2010
O. Amir, O. Rogowski, M. David, N. Lahat, R. Wolff and B.S. Lewis

Background: Interleukin-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine and consequently is considered by many to have a protective role in heart failure, as opposed to the notorious tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

Objectives: To test the hypothesis of the possible beneficial impact of IL-10[1] on mortality in systolic heart failure patients in relation to their circulating TNFα[2] levels.

Methods: We measured circulating levels of IL-10 and TNFα in 67 ambulatory systolic heart failure patients (age 65 ± 13 years).

Results: Mortality was or tended to be higher in patients with higher levels (above median level) of circulating TNFα (9/23, 39% vs. 6/44, 14%; P = 0.02) or IL-10 (10/34, 30% vs. 5/33, 15%; P = 0.10). However, mortality was highest in the subset of patients with elevation of both markers above median (7/16, 44% vs. 8/51, 16%; P = 0.019). Elevation of both markers was associated with more than a threefold hazard ratio for mortality (HR[3] 3.67, 95% confidence interval 1.14–11.78).

Conclusions: Elevated circulating IL-10 levels in systolic heart failure patients do not have a protective counterbalance effect on mortality. Moreover, patients with elevated IL-10 and TNFα had significantly higher mortality, suggesting that the possible interaction in the complex inflammatory and anti-inflammatory network may need further study.

 






[1] IL = interleukin

[2] TNFα = tumor necrosis factor-alpha

[3] HR = hazard ratio


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