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עמוד בית
Tue, 23.04.24

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August 2011
E. Sidon, A. Burg, N. Ohana, M. Salai and I. Dudkiewicz
September 2009
A. Burg, M. Salai, G. Nachum, B. Haviv, S. Heller and I. Dudkiewicz

Background: Gunshot wounds impose a continuous burden on community and hospital resources. Gunshot injuries to the extremities might involve complex soft tissue, bone, vascular, musculotendinous, and nerve injuries. A precise knowledge of anatomy is needed to evaluate and treat those injuries.

Objectives: To review our experience with gunshot wounds to the extremities.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all cases of gunshot wounds to the limbs in a civilian setting treated in our institution during 2003–2005. Altogether, we evaluated 60 patients with 77 injuries.

Results: Of the 60 patients 36 had fractures, 75% of them in the lower extremity and 81% in long bones. The most common fixation modality used was external fixation (33%), followed by intramedullary nailing (25%). This relatively high percentage of fracture treated with external fixation may be attributed to the comminuted pattern of the fractures, the general status of the patient, or the local soft tissue problems encountered in gunshot wounds. About one-fifth of the fractures were treated by debridement only without hardware fixation. We treated 10 vascular injuries in 8 patients; 6 of them were injuries to the popliteal vessels. Fractures around the knee comprised the highest risk factor for vascular injuries, since 5 of the 12 fractures around the knee were associated with vascular injury requiring repair or reconstruction. There were 13 nerve injuries (16.8%), most of them of the deep peroneal nerve (38%). Only three patients had concomitant nerve and vascular injuries. The overall direct complication rate in our series was 20%.

Conclusions: Treating complex gunshot injuries requires a team approach, necessary for a favorable outcome. This team should be led by an orthopedic surgeon knowledgeable in the functional anatomy of the limbs.
 

March 2009
M. Kastner, M. Salai, S. Fichman, S. Heller and I. Dudkiewicz

Background: Elastofibroma is a rare type of lesion consisting of elastic fibers within a stroma of collagen and fatty tissue. It is usually located on the lower scapular region attached firmly to the thoracic cage, often causing debilitating pain. Its clinical presentation mimics a soft tissue tumor.

Objectives: To evaluate the diagnosis and treatment results of elastofibroma.

Methods: Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed in 11 patients with thoracic wall mass. In five of them a biopsy was taken before surgery. All patients were operated and the diagnosis of elastofibroma was confirmed by histology. 

Results: Two patients had a postoperative seroma that resolved spontaneously within a few days. All patients resumed their preoperative activities, including sports.

Conclusions: Considering the slow-growing nature of this tumor and its typical presentation, we believe that when this diagnosis is suspected, investigation does not necessitate staging (as in sarcomas). Also, marginal surgical excision is sufficient. Observation is an acceptable alternative to surgery.
 

February 2007
A. Blankstein, A. Israeli, I. Dudkiewicz, A. Chechik, A. Ganel

Background: When encountering complaints of pain in the area of Achilles tendon with a suspected lesion, the clinician seldom reaches a precise diagnosis based only on X-ray and clinical examination. Ultrasonography is useful for evaluating the pathology and treatment.

Objectives: To assess the relative contribution of real-time intraoperative ultrasound examination and immediate postoperative ultrasound in patients with acute rupture of the Achilles tendon treated by percutaneous suture method. The combination of both procedures provides a unique advantage that could facilitate better results.

Methods: Ultrasound examination was used in 20 patients with acute rupture of the Achilles tendon who were treated surgically. Intraoperative as well as postoperative ultrasound examinations were performed in 5 patients whereas 15 patients underwent an immediate postoperative ultrasound.

Results: Ultrasound pathologies were found in all patients. Percutaneous surgical correction of ruptured Achilles tendon with accurate positioning of the foot using real-time sonography was successful in all the patients.

Conclusion: As in many other soft tissue lesions, ultrasonography is a useful tool for evaluating the pathology and for planning the surgical correction of ruptures in the Achilles tendon.

 
 

January 2005
A. Blankstein, A. Ganel, U. Givon, I. Dudkiewicz, M. Perry, L. Diamant and A. Checkick

Background: Ultrasound is useful in detecting acromioclavicular pathologies in cases of trauma, inflammations and degenerative changes.

Objectives: To describe the sonographic findings of the acromioclavicular joint pathology in patients with anterior shoulder pain.

Methods: Sonographic examination of the ACJ[1] was used to examine 30 adults with anterior shoulder pain. As a control group we studied 30 asymptomatic patients and compared the findings to plain radiographs of the symptomatic group.

Results: The pathologic findings consisted of swelling of the joints, bone irregularities, widening and/or narrowing of the ACJ, soft tissue cyst formation, excessive fluid collection, and calcification. All these signs represent degenerative changes compatible with early osteoarthritis. We encountered one case of septic arthritis that required joint aspiration and antibiotic treatment.

Conclusions: It is our belief that ultrasonography should be used routinely in cases of anterior shoulder pain since it demonstrates various pathologies undetected by plain radiographs.






[1] ACJ = acromioclavicular joint


I. Dudkiewicz, I. Cohen, S. Horowitz, S. Regev, M. Perelman, A. Chechik, P. Langevitz, S. Strasburg, A. Livneh and M. Salai

Background: Heterotopic ossification is a common complication of hip surgery and musculoskeletal or brain traumas.

Objectives: To confirm by in vivo study that colchicine inhibits osteoblast cell proliferation with marked decrease in tissue mineralization.

Methods: Heterotopic ossification was induced in three groups of New Zealand white rabbits (females, 6 months old, weight 3–3.5 kg) by injecting 2 ml bone marrow drawn from the iliac crest into their right thigh muscle. To prevent heterotopic ossification, colchicine (0.25 mg/day) was administered orally for 4 weeks to two groups of adult rabbits: group A (preload group) – 1 week preceding bone marrow injection; group B – on day of injection; and group C – control group.

Results: After 4 weeks the rabbits were evaluated by radiographs and ultrasound for evidence of heterotopic ossification. At the end of the study histologic samples were taken from all the thighs. Imaging and histologic studies showed, with statistical significance, almost complete prevention of heterotopic ossification formation in group A (preload) and a marked decrease in group B, when compared with the controls in whom large new bone had formed at the injection site. These results indicated the inhibitory effects of colchicine on a bone-forming process in soft tissue such as heterotopic ossification.

Conclusions: The role of colchicine in preventing heterotopic ossification in other bone-forming conditions, such as hip arthroplasty or pelvic trauma, and after brain trauma, remains to be evaluated in a clinical setting.

 
 

September 2004
I. Dudkiewicz, A. Oran, M. Salai, R. Palti and M. Pritsch

Background: Adhesive capsulitis, also termed “frozen shoulder,” is controversial by definition and diagnostic criteria that are not sufficiently understood. The clinical course of this condition is considered as self-limiting and is divided into three clinical phases. Several treatment methods for adhesive capsulitis have been reported in the literature, none of which has proven superior to others.

Objectives: To evaluate the long-term follow-up of patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis who were treated conservatively.

Methods: We conducted a long-term follow-up (range 5.5–16 years, mean 9.2 years) of 54 patients suffering from idiopathic adhesive capsulitis. All patients were treated with physical therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

Results: An increased statistically significant improvement (P < 0.00001) was found between the first and last visits to the polyclinic in all measured movement directions: elevation and external and internal rotation.

Conclusions: Conservative treatment (physical therapy and NSAIDs[1]) is a good long-term treatment regimen for idiopathic adhesive capsulitis.






[1] NSAIDs = non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs


October 2003
I. Dudkiewicz, M. Salai, A. Israeli, Y. Amit and A. Chechick

Background: Previously reported results of total hip arthroplasty in patients younger than 30 years of age indicate a high complication rate and questionable durability.

Objectives: To estimate the results of THA[1] in extremely young patients.

Methods: We report the results of 69 THA procedures in 56 patients who were under the age of 30 at the time of surgery (mean age 23.23 ± 4.31 years) and were followed-up postoperatively for 2–23 years (mean 7.4 ± 3.79 years).

Results: Loosening of the cup (11/69) and early traumatic dislocation (5/69) accounted for the majority of complications.

Conclusion: The final average Harris hip scores of 90.59 ± 9.36 in these patients indicated that THA is a successful and durable treatment modality for young patients with disabling diseases affecting the hip joint. However, due to the likelihood of complications it should be used with caution in this patient group. Efforts should be made to diminish the complication rate.






[1] THA = total hip arthroplasty


May 2002
Israel Dudkiewicz, MD, Rami Levi, MD, Alexander Blankstein, MD, Aharon Chechick, MD and Moshe Salai, MD

Background: Open reduction and internal fixation are the current trends of treatment for comminuted calcaneal fractures. Assessing treatment results is often difficult due to discrepancy between objective parameters such as range of movement, and subjective results such as pain.

Objectives: To test the reliability of footprint analysis as an adjuvant method of postoperative assessment of patients who sustained calcaneal fractures.

Methods: Dynamic and static footprint analysis was used as an adjuvant method to objectively assess operative results. This method is simple and is independent of the patient’s initiatives. This modality was used in 22 patients followed-up 9–90 months postoperatively.

Results: We found a good correlation between footprint analysis and objective and subjective parameters of results expressed by the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society hind foot score. In certain cases, this method can be used to distinguish between uncorrelated parameter results, such as malingering, and workmens’ compensation claims.

Conclusion: We recommend the use of this simple, non-invasive objective test as an additional method to assess the results of ankle and foot surgery treatment.
 

August 2001
Alexander Blanjstein, MD, Ilan Cohen, MD, Lidia Diamant, Michael Heim, Israel Dudkiewicz, MD, Amnon Israeli, MD, Avraham Ganel, MD and Aharon Chechick, MD

Background: When encountering complaints of pain in the area of the Achilles tendon, the clinician seldom reaches a correct and precise diagnosis based solely on the grounds of physical examination and standard X-rays.

Objectives: To assess the usefulness of ultrasound in diagnosing pathologies of the Achilles tendon.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of patients presenting at our orthopedic clinics.

Results: Sonography was used to evaluate 41 patients with achillodynia. This modality enabled the diagnoses of 19 abnormal tendons (46%), peritendinous and other lesions a complete rupture in two patients (5%) a partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in 3 (7%) various degrees of calcification of the tendon in 7 (17%) and peritendinous lesions discerned by the tendon’s hypoechoic regions with disorganized arrange­ment of collagen fibrils in 4 patients (10%). Other lesions included tendonitis (3 patients, 7%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (3 patients, 7%), lipoma (1 patient, 2%), and foreign bodies (2 patients, 5%). The mean diameter of the pathological tendons was 10.4 +2.7 mm, while normal tendons measured 5.2 +0.8 mm (P<0.001).

Conclusion: As in many other soft tissue lesions, ultrasonography is a useful tool in the evaluation of the underlying pathology in patients presenting with achillodynia.

October 2000
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