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עמוד בית
Sat, 02.03.24

Search results


February 2022
Anton Warshavsky MD, Roni Rosen MD, Uri Neuman MD, Narin Nard-Carmel MD, Udi Shapira MD, Leonor Trejo MD, Dan M. Fliss MD, and Gilad Horowitz MD

Background: Accuracy of the number and location of pathological lymph nodes (LNs) in the pathology report of a neck dissection (ND) is of vital importance.

Objectives: To quantify the error rate in reporting the location and number of pathologic LNs in ND specimens.

Methods: All patients who had undergone a formal ND that included at least neck level 1 for a clinical N1 disease between January 2010 and December 2017 were included in the study. The error rate of the pathology reports was determined by various means: comparing preoperative imaging and pathological report, reporting a disproportionate LN distribution between the different neck levels, and determining an erroneous location of the submandibular gland (SMG) in the pathology report. Since the SMG must be anatomically located in neck level 1, any mistake in reporting it was considered a categorical error.

Results: A total of 227 NDs met the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. The study included 128 patients who had undergone a dissection at levels 1–3, 68 at levels 1–4, and 31 at levels 1–5. The best Kappa score for correlation between preoperative imaging and final pathology was 0.50. There were nine cases (3.9%) of a disproportionate LN distribution in the various levels. The SMG was inaccurately reported outside neck level 1 in 17 cases (7.5%).

Conclusions: At least 7.5% of ND reports were inaccurate in this investigation. The treating physician should be alert to red flags in the pathological report

March 2019
Ortal Fallek Boldes BSc, Shani Dahan MD, Yahel Segal MD, Dana Ben-Ami Shor MD, Robert K. Huber MD, Iris Barshack MD, Yuval Horowitz MD, Gad Segal MD and Amir Dagan MD

Background: Pericardial biopsies are rarely performed during the diagnosis and management of pericardial diseases. The circumstances and clinical profile of patients undergoing pericardial biopsies are largely uncharacterized.



Objectives: To examine the circumstances in which pericardial biopsies are obtained and to evaluate their diagnostic yield.



Methods: We studied a total of 100 cases (71% males, mean age 60.8 years, range 8.1–84.5 years) of surgically resected pericardium specimens obtained from 2000 to 2015 at Sheba Medical Center, the largest medical center in Israel. Patients were classified into groups according to four major histological etiologies: idiopathic pericarditis, constrictive pericarditis, malignant pericarditis, and post-cardiac injury syndrome (PCIS). The clinical history and course, laboratory, echocardiography, and histological results were reviewed retrospectively.



Results: Causes of pericarditis according to histological definitions included idiopathic pericarditis (29%), constrictive pericarditis (29%), PCIS (9%), and malignant pericarditis (26%). Overall sensitivity of the pericardial biopsy in patients with malignancy was 57.7%. During the study period, we found a trend toward an increased number of biopsies due to constrictive pericarditis and PCIS, along with a decrease in the number of biopsies performed in patients with malignant or idiopathic pericarditis. The diagnosis following biopsy did not change for any of the patients.



Conclusions: Our findings suggest a low diagnostic yield from pericardial biopsies, especially in malignant pericarditis. This conclusion, along with novel therapies, resulted in the infrequent use of pericardial biopsy in recent years.

September 2014
Itai Horowitz MD, Alla Kaplan MD, Suzanna Mostovoy MD, Nurit El-Bar MD, Alex Gizunterman MD and Daniela Amital MD MHA
January 2014
Itai Horowitz, Carlos Cafri, Lior Zeller, Alina Vodonos, Zvi H. Perry and Sergio L. Kobal
Background: The effects of exercise training on cardiac structure and function have been thoroughly investigated in athletes from sport-developed nations; few data are available on sportsmen from sport-developing countries.

Objectives: To assess the incidence and magnitude of the "athlete heart" phenomenon in an elite group of Israeli cyclists.

Methods: An echocardiography study was performed in 56 cyclists (49 males, mean age 38 ± 10 years, weekly average training 13.1 ± 5.9 hours); 96 sedentary subjects served as a control group.

Results: There were significant differences in left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD) between cyclists and the control group (48 ± 4.7 mm vs. 45 ± 4.1 mm respectively, P < 0.001), as well as in inter-ventricular septum (IVS) thickness (9.9 ± 1.2 vs. 8.9 ± 1.2 mm, P < 0.001) and LV mass index (LVMI) (79 ± 16 vs. 68 ± 13 g/m2, P < 0.001). In 5% of the cyclists LVEDD exceeded the upper normal limit of 56 mm. In 7% of the cyclists IVS thickness exceeded the upper normal limit of 11 mm. LV hypertrophy defined as LVMI 134 g/m2 was absent in the entire cyclist group.

Conclusions: Endurance sport activity in well-trained Israeli sportsmen results in a modest increment in LV dimensions and LV mass. LV dilatation and wall thickness above values compatible with primary cardiac disease are rare. These results highlight that in Israeli athletes any abnormal echocardiographic value must be thoroughly investigated and not simply assumed to be a consequence of sport activities.

December 2010
E. Horowitz, I. Abadi-Korek, M. Shani and J. Shemer

Background: The European Quality of Life 5-Dimensions questionnaire is one of the most commonly used measures of health-related quality of life.

Objectives: To present the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the Hebrew version of the EQ-5D[1].

Methods: We conducted face-to-face interviews with a representative sample (n=1666) of the Israeli Jewish population. The data collected included demographic and medical information, and self-valuation of health using the EQ-5D descriptive system, Visual Analogue Scale and Time Trade-Off. Construct validity was assessed by assuming that older individuals, those with a greater burden of diseases, and those reporting experience with their own severe illness would have lower EQ-5D indexes, VAS[2] and TTO[3] values. Test-retest reliability was assessed in a small sample (n=50) that was reevaluated after a 3 week interval.

Results: Test-retest reliability of the EQ-5D and VAS was very high (r ≥ 0.85). Reliability of the TTO was moderate (r = 0.48). There were significant differences in the EQ-5D index, profiles, VAS and TTO between healthy and sick respondents and younger and older respondents, indicating good validity of the instrument.

Conclusions: The Hebrew translation of the EQ-5D is a practical, reliable and valid instrument for assessing the health-related quality of life of the general Israeli Jewish population.






[1] EQ-5D = European Quality of Life 5-Dimensions

[2] VAS = Visual Analogue Scale

[3] TTO = Time Trade-Off


September 2010
I. Fuchs, M. Abu-Shakra, E. Gelfer, A. Smoliakov, D. Ben-Haroch, J. Horowitz and L.S. Avnon
July 2010
L. Barski, R. Nevzorov, J. Horowitz and S. Horowitz

Background: Clinical and epidemiologic features of coronary heart disease may not be explained solely by established risk factors. The role of infectious pathogens in the development and rupture of atherosclerotic plaques remains elusive but an association between Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and CHD[1] has been previously reported

Objectives: To determine whether there is an association between mycoplasmal infections and CHD.

Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort analysis of 150 consecutive hospitalized patients with CHD (85 with acute coronary syndrome and 65 admitted for unrelated reasons) and 98 healthy blood donors. Antibody titers for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, M. fermentans, M. hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum were measured with the agglutination test or specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in all three groups of patients.

Results: Analysis of the antibody titers did not reveal any significant difference in the presence of mycoplasmal antibodies between the patients with ACS[2], patients with known stable CHD hospitalized for non-CHD reasons, and healthy blood donors.

Conclusions: Determination of specific antibodies did not reveal a significant association among different types of mycoplasmal infection and CHD.





[1] CHD = coronary heart disease

[2] ACS = acute coronary syndrome

September 2008
L. Barski, S. Horowitz, E. Rabaev, A. Sidi, A. Porath and A. B Jotkowitz
June 2008
January 2005
I. Dudkiewicz, I. Cohen, S. Horowitz, S. Regev, M. Perelman, A. Chechik, P. Langevitz, S. Strasburg, A. Livneh and M. Salai

Background: Heterotopic ossification is a common complication of hip surgery and musculoskeletal or brain traumas.

Objectives: To confirm by in vivo study that colchicine inhibits osteoblast cell proliferation with marked decrease in tissue mineralization.

Methods: Heterotopic ossification was induced in three groups of New Zealand white rabbits (females, 6 months old, weight 3–3.5 kg) by injecting 2 ml bone marrow drawn from the iliac crest into their right thigh muscle. To prevent heterotopic ossification, colchicine (0.25 mg/day) was administered orally for 4 weeks to two groups of adult rabbits: group A (preload group) – 1 week preceding bone marrow injection; group B – on day of injection; and group C – control group.

Results: After 4 weeks the rabbits were evaluated by radiographs and ultrasound for evidence of heterotopic ossification. At the end of the study histologic samples were taken from all the thighs. Imaging and histologic studies showed, with statistical significance, almost complete prevention of heterotopic ossification formation in group A (preload) and a marked decrease in group B, when compared with the controls in whom large new bone had formed at the injection site. These results indicated the inhibitory effects of colchicine on a bone-forming process in soft tissue such as heterotopic ossification.

Conclusions: The role of colchicine in preventing heterotopic ossification in other bone-forming conditions, such as hip arthroplasty or pelvic trauma, and after brain trauma, remains to be evaluated in a clinical setting.

 
 

February 2003
N. Horowitz, M. Kapeliovich, R. Beyar and H. Hammerman

Background: Coronary stenting was recently introduced as a primary intervention for acute myocardial infarction. Several randomized controlled studies have shown that stenting may be superior to balloon angioplasty for the treatment of AMI[1]. However, routine stenting may also cause deterioration of coronary flow.

Objective: To analyze the clinical characteristics and the outcome of patients who were treated with stenting for AMI in our center in the recent era of stenting.

Methods: Fifty-five patients with AMI were treated by stent implantation between January 1998 and December 1999. Adverse clinical events were recorded, including death, recurrent infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting, cerebrovascular accident, and target vessel revascularization. In-hospital, 1 month, 6 month and 1 year follow-up was performed in all patients. Repeated coronary angiography was performed according to clinical indications.

Results: Baseline angiographic results showed Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) 0 flow in 39 patients (70.9%), TIMI I flow in no patient and TIMI II/III flow in 16 patients (29.1%). TIMI grade 3 flow was achieved in 90.9% of patients at the end of the procedure. In-hospital mortality rate was 5.4% (2.1% in patients without cardiogenic shock). There was no evidence of re-infarction or TVR[2]. The rates of bleeding complication (all of them minor), CVA[3], and CABG[4] were 9.1%, 3.6% and 1.8% respectively. The 6 month mortality rate remained the same. Rates of re-infarction, restenosis, TVR and CABG were 3.6%, 14.5%, 14.5% and 5.4% respectively. The 1 year mortality rate was 7.3%. Restenosis rate was 18% and CABG 7.3%. One year event-free survival was 70.9%.

Conclusions: This study suggests that stenting is a safe and effective mode of therapy in the setting of AMI associated with a high rate of revascularization and a low short and long-term outcome.






[1] AMI = acute myocardial infarction



[2] TVR = target vessel revascularization

[3] cerebrovascular accident



[4] CABG = coronary artery bypass grafting



 
September 2002
Dan Miron, MD, Yoseph Merzel, MD, Amiram Lev, MD, Jean-Jack Meir, MD and Yoseph Horowitz, MD
August 2000
Alex Zvulunov MD, Evgeny Medvedovsky MD, Amnon Biton MD, Shulamit Horowitz PhD and Daniel Vardy MD, MSc

Background: The frequent coexistence of two or more sexually transmitted diseases in one patient has been reported in non-dermatological literature, mostly in languages other than English. Identification of Ureaplasma urealyticum, Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma hominis in men with other STDs is important, since these bacteria have been implicated in a variety of diseases such as non-gonococcal urethritis, premature rupture of fetal membranes, and infertility in female sexual partners of these patients.

Objective: To assess the frequency of concomitant STD, particularly urethral colonization of U. urealyticum, C. trachomatis and M. hominis, in men consulting for suspected STD-related symptoms.

Methods: All patients attending our dermatology clinic for STD-related symptoms during a 12 month period in 1996–97 underwent systematic clinical and laboratory screening for syphilis, gonorrhea, NGU, prostatitis, genital herpes simplex infection, Condyloma acuminatum, urethral carriage of U. urealyticum, C. trachomatis and M. hominis, as well as serological screening for HIV, and hepatitis B and C infections.

Results: A total of 169 men with STD-related symptoms were enrolled in the study. The following clinical diagnoses were established: NGU in 109 men, C. acuminatum in 40, genital herpes simplex in 10, prostatitis in 7, latent syphilis in 6, primary syphilis in 1, and Behcet’s disease in 1. No clinical evidence of STD was found in 13 patients. Of the 169 patients, 39 (23%) had two or more concomitant STDs, of whom 27 (69%) had C. acuminatum associated with one or more of the urethral pathogens. A positive U. urealyticum culture was found in 67.5% (27/40) of the men with C. acuminatum as compared to 42% (40/96) among the patients with NGU who did not have C. acuminatum (P=0.004, X2 test). Conversely, the prevalence of C. acuminatum among patients positive for U. urealyticum was significantly higher than the prevalence among those who were negative – 27/75 (36%) vs. 13/94 (14%), P<0.0009, X2 test. About half of the U. urealyticum-positive patients with C. acuminatum had no clinical signs or symptoms of urethritis.

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that patients with C. acuminatum should be assessed for U. urealyticum carriage and, when identified, their sexual contacts should be actively sought and treated.

__________________________________

 

* Dr. Zvulunov is now with the Department of Pediatrics, Joseftal Hospital, Eilat, Israel.

STDs = sexually transmitted diseases

NGU = non-gonococcal urethritis

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