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עמוד בית
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November 2008
G. Markel, A. Krivoy, E. Rotman, O. Schein, S. Shrot, T. Brosh-Nissimov, T. Dushnitsky, A. Eisenkraft
The relative accessibility to various chemical agents, including chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial compounds, places a toxicological mass casualty event, including chemical terrorism, among the major threats to homeland security. TMCE[1] represents a medical and logistic challenge with potential hazardous exposure of first-response teams. In addition, TMCE poses substantial psychological and economical impact. We have created a simple response algorithm that provides practical guidelines for participating forces in TMCE. Emphasis is placed on the role of first responders, highlighting the importance of early recognition of the event as a TMCE, informing the command and control centers, and application of appropriate self-protection. The medical identification of the toxidrome is of utmost importance as it may dictate radically different approaches and life-saving modalities. Our proposed emergency management of TMCE values the “Scoop & Run” approach orchestrated by an organized evacuation plan rather than on-site decontamination. Finally, continuous preparedness of health systems – exemplified by periodic CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radio-Nuclear) medical training of both first responders and hospital staff, mandatory placement of antidotal auto-injectors in all ambulances and CBRN[2] emergency kits in the emergency departments – would considerably improve the emergency medical response to TMCE.

 


[1] TMCE = toxicological mass casualty event

[2] CBRN = chemical, biological, radio-nuclear 
July 2008
I. Makarovsky, G. Markel, T. Dushnitsky and A. Eisenkraft
May 2008
I. Makarovsky, G. Markel, T. Dushnitsky and A. Eisenkraft
April 2008
I. Makarovsky, G. Markel, T. Dushnitsky and A. Eisenkraft
February 2008
I. Makarovsky, G. Markel, A. Hoffman, O. Schein, T. Brosh-Nissimov, Z. Tashma, T. Dushnitsky and A. Eisenkraft
January 2008
G. Markel, M. Imazio, A. Brucato and Y. Adler


The most troublesome complication of acute pericarditis is recurrent episodes of pericardial inflammation, which occur in 15–32% of cases. It was recently found that viral infection has a major role, but in many cases the cause is unknown. The optimal method for prevention has not been fully established; accepted modalities include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents, and pericardiectomy. Based on the proven efficacy of colchicine in familial Mediterranean fever, several small and large-scale international clinical trials have shown the beneficial effect of colchicine therapy in preventing recurrent pericarditis. Indeed, colchicines-treated patients consistently display significantly fewer recurrences, longer symptom-free periods, and even when attacks occur they are weaker and shorter in nature. It was also found that pretreatment with corticosteroids substantially attenuates the efficacy of colchicine, as evidenced by significantly more recurrences and longer therapy periods. Colchicine is a safe and effective modality for the treatment and prevention of recurrent pericarditis, especially as an adjunct to other modalities, since it provides a sustained benefit superior to all current modalities. The safety profile seems superior to other drugs such as corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs.

October 2007
I. Makarovsky, G. Markel, A. Hoffman, O. Schein, A. Finkelstien, T. Brosh-Nissimov, Z. Tashma, T. Dushnitsky and A. Eisenkraft
September 2007
I. Makarovsky, G. Markel, A. Hoffman, O. Schein, T.M. Brosh-Nissimov, A. Finkelstien, Z. Tashma, T. Dushnitsky and A. Eisenkraft
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