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עמוד בית
Sat, 20.07.24

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April 2019
Elisabeth Dramsdahl MD, Dag Gundersen Storla MD and Marco Harari MD

Background: Multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation for patients presenting with rheumatic diseases has been shown to produce better results in a warm climate. Dead Sea Climatotherapy (DSC) has been successfully used for decades to treat many patients with rheumatic diseases.

Objectives: To evaluate the short-term improvement of Norwegian patients who presented with chronic pain following a multidisciplinary biopsychosocial approach to treatment combined with DSC. Both objective and subjective clinical parameters were evaluated.

Methods: This retrospective study included a statistical analysis of 938 patients presenting with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis (n=105), osteoarthritis (n=342), fibromyalgia (n=374), and other orthopedic conditions (n=117). Clinical assessments were conducted before and after a 3 week treatment program at the Dead Sea.

Results: Six parameters improved significantly in the rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis group as well as in the osteoarthritis group. Five parameters in the fibromyalgia group improved, while two improved in the orthopedic conditions group. Overall, major significant changes occurred in the pain self-assessment, joint motility, and daily activities scores.

Conclusions: A 3-week multidisciplinary biopsychosocial program combined with DSC induced positive changes in the clinical parameters of Norwegian patients presenting with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

June 2018
J.F. de Carvalho, F.A.G. da Rocha Araújo, L.M.A. da Mota, R.B. Aires and R.P. de Araujo

Background: Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency have been reported in fibromyalgia. However, to the best of our knowledge, only one study has evaluated the role of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] supplementation on fibromyalgia symptoms.

Objectives: To analyze the effects of 3 months of 25(OH)D supplementation on symptoms of fibromyalgia.

Methods: This study included 11 female patient. Demographic and clinical data, tender points, visual analog scale results, and pre- and post-serum levels of 25(OH)D supplementation were analyzed. The levels of 25(OH)D were measured by a radioimmunologic test.

Results: Patients with fibromyalgia diagnosis and 25(OH)D values ≤ 30 ng/ml were recruited to receive 50,000 IU of oral vitamin D once every week for 3 months. The disease was diagnosed based on the American College of Rheumatology criteria. The median age of all patients was 48.5 (28–67) years and 63.4% were Caucasian. Disease duration varied from 1–10 years. The 25(OH)D levels increased significantly after 3 months, 18.4 (15.5–25.8) ng/ml vs. 33.8 (28–58) ng/ml, P = 0.01. Interestingly, an improvement of visual analog scale scores was observed at 3 months, 90 (0–100) vs. 30 (0–80), P = 0.002. Eight patients (72.2%) responded that they experienced a very significant improvement in symptoms. In addition, a trend for reduction of the number of tender points was observed after 3 months, 17 (11–18) vs. 10 (0–18), P = 0.07.

Conclusions: The 25(OH)D levels and disease symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency seem to improve with vitamin D supplementation.

December 2014
Vera Stejskal PhD
Background: The multiple symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia resemble those described in patients suffering from autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). It has been suggested that chronic metal-induced inflammation might play a role both in CFS and fibromyalgia as well as in ASIA. Humans are exposed to metals mainly through the release of metal ions from corroding dental restorations and orthopedic implants, food, vaccines and jewelry. Metals readily bind to sulphur and other groups in the mitochondria, enzymes and cell proteins. Metal-bound proteins are recognized by the immune system of susceptible subjects and might trigger an abnormal immune response, including allergy and autoimmunity.

Objectives:  To study three subjects with CFS and two with fibromyalgia, all of whom suspected metal exposure as a trigger for their ill health.

Methods: We measured delayed-type hypersensitivity to metals (metal allergy) using a validated lymphocyte transformation test, LTT-MELISA®. All patients except one were sensitized to metals present in their dental restorations. The remaining patient reacted to metals in his skull implant. The removal of sensitizing metals resulted in long-term health improvement. Nine healthy controls matched for gender and age showed only marginal reactivity to the metals tested.

Conclusions: Patients with CFS and fibromyalgia are frequently sensitized to metals found in the environment or used in dentistry and surgery. This allergy to metals might initiate or aggravate non-specific symptoms in metal-sensitized patients.
October 2014
Yael Bar-On MD, Varda Shalev MD, Dahlia Weitzman PhD, Gabriel Chodick PhD and Howard Amital MD MHA
December 2013
Howard Amital, Jacob Ablin, Valeire Aloush, Winfried Häuser and Dan Buskila
February 2013
September 2012
December 2011
I. Grodman, D. Buskila, Y. Arnson, A. Altaman, D. Amital and H. Amital
June 2009
H. Tandeter, M. Grynbaum, I. Zuili, S. Shany and P. Shvartzman
January 2008
N. Bassi, D. Amital, H. Amital, A. Doria and Y. Shoenfeld

Chronic fatigue syndrome is a heterogeneous disorder with unknown pathogenesis and etiology, characterized by disabling fatigue, difficulty in concentration and memory, and concomitant skeletal and muscular pain. Several mechanisms have been suggested to play a role in CFS[1], such as excessive oxidative stress following exertion, immune imbalance characterized by decreased natural killer cell and macrophage activity, immunoglobulin G subclass deficiencies (IgG-1[2], IgG-3) and decreased serum concentrations of complement component. Autoantibodies were also suggested as a possible factor in the pathogenesis of CFS. Recent studies indicate that anti-serotonin, anti-microtubule-associated protein 2 and anti-muscarinic cholinergic receptor 1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of CFS. It has been demonstrated that impairment in vasoactive neuropeptide metabolism may explain the CFS symptoms







[1] CFS = chronic fatigue syndrome

[2] IgG = immunoglobulin G


December 2003
H. Gur, A. Rubinow, D. Buskila
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