• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Mon, 26.02.24

Search results


August 2018
Salim Halabi MD, Awny Elias MD, Michael Goldberg MD, Hilal Hurani MD, Husein Darawsha MD, Sharon Shachar MA and Miti Ashkenazi RN MPH

Background: Door-to-balloon time (DTBT) ≤ 90 minutes has become an important quality indicator in the management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We identified three specific problems in the course from arrival of STEMI patients at our emergency department to initiation of balloon inflation and determined an intervention comprised of specific administrative and professional steps. The focus of the intervention was on triage within the emergency department (ED) and on increasing the efficiency and accuracy of electrocardiography interpretation.

Objectives: To examine whether our intervention reduced the proportion of patients with DTBT > 90 minutes.

Methods: We compared DTBT of patients admitted to the ED with STEMI during the year preceding and the year following implementation of the intervention.

Results: Demographic and clinical characteristics at presentation to the ED were similar for patients admitted to the ED in the year preceding and the year following intervention. The year preceding intervention, DTBT was > 90 minutes for 19/78 patients (24%). The year after intervention, DTBT was > 90 minutes for 17/102 patients (17%). For both years, the median DTBT was 1 hour. Patients with DTBT > 90 minutes tended to be older and more often female. Diagnoses in the ED were similar between those with DTBT ≤ 90 minutes and > 90 minutes. In-hospital mortality was 17% (13/78) and 14% (14/102) for the respective time periods.

Conclusions: An intervention specifically designed to address problems identified at one medical center was shown to decrease the proportion of patients with DTBT > 90 minutes.

April 2017
Alexander Shturman MD, Shira Vardi MD, Amitai Bickel MD and Shaul Atar MD

Background: The very long-term prognostic significance of ventricular late potentials (VLP) in patients post ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is unclear.

Objective: To evaluate the long-term predictive value of VLP for mortality post-STEMI.

Methods: We conducted serial signal-averaged electrocardiography (SAECG) measurements in 63 patients on the 1st, 2nd and 3rd day pre-discharge, and 30 days after STEMI in patients admitted in 2001. We followed the patients for 10 years and correlated the presence of VLP with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality.

Results: The mean age was 59.9 ± 12.3 years. Thrombolysis was performed in 41 patients (65%). Percutaneous coronary intervention was performed pre-discharge in 40 patients (63%) and coronary artery bypass grafting in 7 (11%). Five consecutive measurements to define the presence of VLP were obtained in 52 patients (21 with VLP and 31 without). We found a higher prevalence of VLP in males compared to females (QRS segment > 114 msec, 51% vs. 12%, P = 0.02, duration of the low amplitude signal < 40 mV) in the terminal portion of the averaged QRS complex > 38 msec, 47% vs. 25%, P = 0.05). Over 10 years of follow-up, 14 (22%) patients died, 10 (70%) due to cardiovascular non-arrhythmic complications, 6 with VLP compared to only 3 without (28.6% vs. 9.7%, P = 0.125, hazard ratio = 2.96, confidence intervals = 0.74–11.84) (are these numbers meant to total 10?).

Conclusions: Over 10 years of follow-up, the presence of VLP in early post-STEMI is not predictive of arrhythmic or non-arrhythmic cardiovascular mortality.

July 2014
Michael Arad MD, Tamar Nussbaum MD, Ido Blechman BA, Micha S. Feinberg MD, Nira Koren-Morag PhD,Yael Peled MD and Dov Freimark MD

Background: Contemporary therapies improve prognosis and may restore left ventricular (LV) size and function.

Objectives: To examine the prevalence, clinical features and therapies associated with reverse remodeling (RR) in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM).

Methods: The study group comprised 188 DCM patients who had undergone two echo examinations at least 6 months apart. RR was defined as increased LV ejection fraction (LVEF) by ≥ 10% concomitant with ≥ 10% decreased LV end-diastolic dimension.

Results: RR occurred in 50 patients (26%) and was associated with significantly reduced end-systolic dimension, left atrial size, grade of mitral regurgitation, and pulmonary artery pressure. NYHA class improved in the RR group. RR was less common in familial DCM and a long-standing disease and was more prevalent in patients with prior exposure to chemotherapy. Recent-onset disease, lower initial LVEF and normal electrocardiogram were identified as independent predictors of RR. Beta-blocker dose was related to improved LVEF but not to RR. Over a mean follow-up of 23 months, 16 patients (12%) from the 'no-RR' group died or underwent heart transplantation compared to none from the RR group (P < 0.01).

Conclusions: Contemporary therapies led to an an improvement in the condition of a considerable number of DCM patients. A period of close observation while optimizing medical therapy should be considered before deciding on invasive procedures. 

August 2012
A. Shturman, A. Bickel and S. Atar

Background: The prognostic value of P-wave duration has been previously evaluated by signal-averaged ECG (SAECG) in patients with various arrhythmias not associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

Objectives: To investigate the clinical correlates and prognostic value of P-wave duration in patients with ST elevation AMI (STEMI).

Methods: The patients (n=89) were evaluated on the first, second and third day after admission, as well as one week and one month post-AMI. Survival was determined 2 years after the index STEMI.

Results: In comparison with the upper normal range of P-wave duration (< 120 msec), the P-wave duration in STEMI patients was significantly increased on the first day (135.31 ¡À 29.29 msec, P < 0.001), up to day 7 (127.17 ¡À 30.02 msec, P = 0.0455). The most prominent differences were observed in patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ¡Ü 40% (155.47 ¡À 33.8 msec), compared to LVEF > 40% (128.79 ¡À 28 msec) (P = 0.001). P-wave duration above 120 msec was significantly correlated with increased complication rate namely, sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmia (36%), congestive heart failure (41%), atrial fibrillation (11%), recurrent angina (14%), and re-infarction (8%) (P = 0.012, odds ratio 4.267, 95% confidence interval 1.37¨C13.32). P-wave duration of 126 msec on the day of admission was found to have the highest predictive value for in-hospital complications including LVEF < 40% (area under the curve 0.741, P < 0.001).  However, we did not find a significant correlation between P-wave duration and mortality after multivariate analysis.

Conclusions: P-wave duration as evaluated by SAECG correlates negatively with LVEF post- STEMI, and P-wave duration above 126 msec can be utilized as a non-invasive predictor of in-hospital complications and low LVEF following STEMI.

October 2002
Bernard Belhassen, MD and Aharon Glick, MD
November 2000
Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel