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עמוד בית
Sat, 22.06.24

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January 2022
Nariman Saba Khazen MD, Andrew Brash MD, Miri Steier MD, Dennis Kunichoff MsC, and Ronit Wollstein MD

Background: Identifying and treating patients with fragility fractures may be effective in prevention of subsequent fractures because a first fragility fracture often predicts a second fracture.

Objectives: To evaluate a multidisciplinary anti-osteoporotic clinic for patients with prior distal radius fragility fractures (DRFF). To assess whether addressing this early fracture may prevent a second fracture.

Methods: A retrospective case-control study was performed. Cases included patients treated surgically for DRFF who were assessed at a tertiary, multidisciplinary, fracture-prevention clinic. Controls were a series of similarly treated patients who did not attend the clinic. The primary outcome measure was a second fracture.

Results: Average follow-up was 42 months for the treated group and 85 months for the untreated group. The treated group received more treatment for osteoporosis than controls; however, despite one new fracture in the treated group and six new fractures in the control group, there was no significant difference in fracture occurrence.

Conclusions: This pilot study supports the effectiveness of our multidisciplinary anti-osteoporotic clinic in treating osteoporosis but not in reducing subsequent fractures. Further study with larger cohorts and longer follow-up is needed to improve our ability to implement effective prevention of fragility fractures.

February 2018
Alan Katz MD, Amanda Almakias BsC and Ronit Wollstein MD

Background: Fractures of the distal radius are the most common fractures in the upper extremity, and their incidence is increasing with the aging of the population. Despite anatomical reduction of the bones, many patients complain of residual pain. A reason for this may be ligament injury not addressed during surgery or conservative treatment. Radiographic measurements may allow assessment of ligament integrity but they may be population specific and differ among races.

Objectives: To assess radiographic wrist measurements in an Israeli population and to compare them to existing values.

Methods: Demographic data, previous diagnosis of osteoporosis, fracture classification, and radiologic measurements (radial height, radial inclination, ulnar variance, volar tilt, and d2/w2) were measured and compared.

Results: The study was comprised of 53 females and 27 males, mean age 64 years, with wrist radiographs following surgery. Of these, 13% were smokers and 38.5% had osteoporosis. According to the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen classification system, most of the fractures were comminuted and intra-articular. The mean values for all measurements did not differ significantly from values in the literature. The average d2/w2 ratio (describing the radiocarpal ligaments) was 0.42, significantly differing from this measurement in normal wrists as described in the literature, but similar to a population following surgery (P = 0.002).

Conclusions: Our population had more fragility fractures than other populations. Otherwise, our demographics and measurements did not differ from normal values described in the literature. This study supports the validity of any wrist radiographic study performed in our population.

 

July 2010
M. Haddad, G. Rubin, M. Soudry and N. Rozen

Background: There is controversy as to which is the preferred treatment for distal radius intra-articular fractures – anatomic reduction or external fixation.

Objectives: To evaluate the radiologic and functional outcome following external fixation of these fractures.

Methods: Between January 2003 and March 2005, 43 patients with distal radius intra-articular fractures were treated using a mini-external AO device. Follow-up of 38 of the patients included X-rays at 1 week, 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. The Visual Analogue Scale was used to assess pain levels, and the Lidstrom criteria scale to evaluate functional outcome and wrist motion. Clinical and radiographic results were correlated.

Results: According to the Lidstrom criteria, the results were excellent in 31%, good in 61% and fair in 5.5%; 2.5% had a poor outcome. The results of the VAS[1] were good. Thirty-five patients gained a good range of wrist movement, but 3 had a markedly reduced range. We found statistical correlation between the radiographic and clinical results, emphasizing the value of good reduction. There was no correlation between fracture type (Frykman score) and radiologic results or clinical results.

Conclusions: External fixation seems to be the preferred method of treatment for distal radius intra-articular fractures, assuming that good reduction can be achieved. The procedure is also quick, the risk of infection is small, and there is little damage to the surrounding tissues.

 






[1] VAS = Visual Analogue Scale


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