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עמוד בית
Sat, 20.07.24

Search results


October 2023
Andreza Rosa Cabral MS, Josy Davidson PhD, Jozélio Freire de Carvalho MD PhD

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory disease characterized by synovitis leading to polyarthritis. It affects 1% of the population [1]. Genetic and environmental factors are linked to the development of RA and include the presence of HLA-DR4 and shared epitope, and smoking is the primary representative of the negative environmental factor [1].

However, RA mainly affects middle age. Late-onset RA that initiates after 60 years is sometimes named elderly onset rheumatoid arthritis (EORA) [2]. This disease's prevalence varied from 2.03% to 2.34% in a large study in the United States. EORA affects more women than men [1]. However, to the best of our knowledge, no patient description of RA initiated at 97 years of age has been described.

November 2021
Guy Feldman MD, Yoram A. Weil MD, Ram Mosheiff MD, Amit Davidson MD, Nimrod Rozen MD PhD, and Guy Rubin MD

Background: Toward the end of 2019, the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic began to create turmoil for global health organizations. The illness, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), spreads by droplets and fomites and can rapidly lead to life-threatening lung disease, especially for the old and those with health co-morbidities. Treating orthopedic patients, who presented with COVID-19 while avoiding nosocomial transmission, became of paramount importance.

Objectives: To present relevant methods for pandemic control and hospital accommodation with emphasis on orthopedic surgery.

Methods: We searched search PubMed and Google Scholar electronic databases using the following keywords: COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, screening tools, personal protective equipment, and surgery triage.

Results: We included 25 records in our analysis. The recommendations from these records were divided into the following categories: COVID-19 disease, managing orthopedic surgery in the COVID-19 era, general institution precautions, triage of orthopedic surgeries, preoperative assessment, surgical room setting, personal protection equipment, anesthesia, orthopedic surgery technical precautions, and department stay and rehabilitation.

Conclusions: Special accommodations tailored for each medical facility, based on disease burden and available resources can improve patient and staff safety and reduce elective surgery cancellations. This article will assist orthopedic surgeons during the COVID-19 medical crisis, and possibly for future pandemics

Milena Tocut MD, Tima Davidson MD, Rebecca Leibu, Howard Amital MD MHA, Yehuda Shoenfeld MD FRCP MaACR, and Ora Shovman MD
March 2020
Eyal Lotan MD PhD, Kent P. Friedman MD, Tima Davidson MD and Timothy M. Shepherd MD PhD

The authors reviewed the two most common current uses of brain 18F-labeled fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) at a large academic medical center. For epilepsy patients considering surgical management, FDG-PET can help localize epileptogenic lesions, discriminate between multiple or discordant EEG or MRI findings, and predict prognosis for post-surgical seizure control. In elderly patients with cognitive impairment, FDG-PET often demonstrates lobar-specific patterns of hypometabolism that suggest particular underlying neurodegenerative pathologies, such as Alzheimer’s disease. FDG-PET of the brain can be a key diagnostic modality and contribute to improved patient care.

October 2018
Michael Peer MD, Sharbell Azzam MD, Vladislav Gofman MD, Mark Kushnir MD, Benjamin Davidson MD and Carmel Armon MD

Background: Thymectomy is a reliable surgical method for treating patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) and benign tumors of the thymus. Despite the advantages of minimally invasive surgical approaches for resection of thymic neoplasms, there are still controversies regarding the superiority of one type of surgery over another.

Objectives: To report the results of our initial Israeli experience with robotic thymectomy in 22 patients with MG and suspected benign thymic tumors.

Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 22 patients (10 men, 12 women) who underwent robotic thymectomy by a left-sided (16) or right-sided approach (6) using the da Vinci robotic system at Assaf Harofeh Medical Center. Seven patients were diagnosed with MG before surgery and 14 had suspected benign thymic neoplasms.

Results: Average operative time was 90 minutes. There were no deaths or intraoperative complications. Postoperative complications occurred in two patients (dyspnea and pleural effusion). Median blood loss was 12.3 cc (range 5–35 cc), median hospital stay 2.9 days (range 2–5 days), and mean weight of resected thymus 32.1 grams. Seven patients had thymic hyperplasia, six a lipothymoma, one a thymic cyst. Seven each had thymomas in different stages and one had a cavernous hemangioma.

Conclusions: Robotic thymectomy is a safe, technically effective surgical method for resection of thymic neoplasms. The advantages of this technique are safety, short hospitalization period, little blood loss, and low complications. We have included this surgical procedure in our thoracic surgery residency program and recommend a learning curve program of 10 to 12 procedures during residency.

July 2018
Tima Davidson, Michal M. Ravid, Ella Nissan, Mirriam Sklair-Levy, Johnatan Nissan and Bar Chikman

Background: When a breast lesion is suspected based on a physical exam, mammography, or ultrasound, a stereotactic core needle biopsy (CNB) is usually performed to help establish a definitive diagnosis. CNBs are far less invasive than excisional biopsies, with no need for general anesthetics or hospitalization, and no recovery period. However, since only samples of the mass are removed in a CNB and not the whole mass, sampling errors can occur.

Objectives: To compare the degree of agreement between the pathological data from CNBs and excisional biopsies from a single tertiary referral hospital.

Methods: The concordance of pathological data was compared in patients who underwent CNBs and had their surgical procedures at the same medical center.

Results: From the 894 patients who underwent CNBs, 254 (28.4%) underwent subsequent excisional biopsies at our medical center. From the total of 894 patients, 227 (25.3%) who underwent a CNB were diagnosed with a malignancy, with the rest of the CNBs being diagnosed as benign pathologies. The pathological findings in the CNBs and in the excisional biopsies concurred in 232/254 (91.3%) of the cases.

Conclusions: A CNB to confirm mammographic or clinical findings of breast lesions is an accurate method to establish a pathological diagnosis of breast lesions. The accuracy is higher for invasive carcinomas than for non-invasive cancers. Excisional biopsies are necessary for lesions with anticipated sampling errors or when the core needle biopsy findings are discordant with clinical or mammographic findings.

November 2017
Tima Davidson MD, Amit Druyan MD, Elinor Goshen MD and Merav Lidar MD

Background: Facial rejuvenation using different dermal and sub-dermal injectable compounds is a popular cosmetic procedure which may pose a diagnostic dilemma to the radiologist.

Objectives: To describe the appearance of cosmetic facial fillers on PET-CT.

Methods: All PET-CT exams performed between January 2015 and May 2017 in which findings suggestive of prior facial filler procedures was evident and where anamnestic confirmation with the patient was possible were reviewed.

Results: We describe five females who had undergone facial filler procedures leading to calcifications around the mouth and nasolabial triangle.

Conclusions: Familiarity with the appearance of such cosmetic procedures on PET-CT is of paramount importance in order to avoid misinterpretation of the findings leading to unnecessary apprehension and work-up.

January 2016
Ruth Shaylor BMBS BMedSci, Fayez Saifi MD, Elyad Davidson MD and Carolyn F. Weiniger MB ChB

Background: Successful neuraxial block performance relies on assessment and palpation of surface landmarks, potentially challenging in patients with high body mass index (BMI). 

Objectives: To evaluate the use of ultrasound-assisted neuraxial bock in a non-obstetric population with BMI above versus below 30 kg/m2.

Methods: Healthy adult patients undergoing extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) under neuraxial block were observed in this quality assurance study. Prior to the neuraxial block, an ultrasound examination was performed to identify the puncture site. Neuraxial anesthesia block was performed under aseptic surgical conditions with the patient in the sitting position. Following block placement, external landmarks were palpated. Our primary study outcome was the number of attempts (skin insertions with the needle) after pre-puncture ultrasound identification of the insertion point, comparing patients with BMI above versus below 30 kg/m2. Our secondary outcome was assessment by palpation of external anatomical landmarks.

Results: Our study group included 63 consecutive patients undergoing neuraxial block for ESWL. Data were assessed according to BMI (above versus below 30 kg/m2). An overall success rate at the first attempt of 90.5% (CI 0.8–0.95) was achieved using ultrasound-guided neuraxial block. This block placement success rate was similar for all patients, regardless of BMI above versus below 30 kg/m2. In contrast, the ease of palpation of anatomic landmarks, P = 0.001, and the ease of palpation of iliac crest, P < 0.001, differed significantly between the patients above versus below 30 kg/m2. The reported verbal pain scores (VPS) due to block insertion was similar among all patients regardless of BMI category (above versus below 30 kg/m2).

Conclusions: We observed high success rates when ultrasound-assisted neuraxial block is performed, regardless of BMI above versus below 30 kg/m2, despite expected differences in surface landmark palpation. 

 

October 2013
O. Zavdy, G. Twig, A. Kneller, G. Yaniv, T. Davidson, G. Schiby and H. Amital
November 2010
B. Chikman, R. Lavy, T. Davidson, I. Wassermann, J. Sandbank, N. Siegelmann-Danieli and A. Halevy

Background: Infiltrating ductal carcinoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma account for more than 90% of all invasive breast cancer histological types. The rate of ILC[1] is reported to be increasing steadily in the United States and Europe.

Objectives: To describe the trend in the incidence of ILC in a large cohort of patients who underwent surgery in a single institution over an 18 year period.

Methods: Our comprehensive database of 2175 consecutive patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed during the period 1992–2009 served for the analysis. Several potential factors associated with lobular carcinoma as compared with ductal carcinoma were evaluated.

Results: During this period, a 2.4-fold increase in the incidence of pure ILC was noted, from 4.6% in the years 1992–1994 to 10.9% in 2004–2006, followed by a modest decrease to 8.7% in 2007–2009. A significant association of lobular malignancies with external hormonal use was noted, including hormone replacement therapy exposure in patients diagnosed at age 50–64, and ovarian overstimulation during in vitro fertilization in those diagnosed at age 50 or less.  

Conclusions: Better diagnostic tools – such as the liberal use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging – and more accurate pathological definition for ILC type appear to influence the changes in the incidence of ILC in the subgroups of invasive breast cancer.






[1] ILC = infiltrating lobular carcinoma


February 2009
T. Davidson, O. Goitein, A. Avigdor, S. Tzila Zwas and E. Goshen

Background: Venous thromboembolism is a well-recognized and relatively frequent complication of malignancy, whereas tumor thrombosis is a rare complication of solid cancers. Correct diagnosis of tumor thrombosis and its differentiation from VTE[1] can alter patient management and prevent unnecessary long-term anticoagulation treatment.

Objectives: To evaluate the contribution of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography to the diagnosis of tumor thrombosis and its differentiation from VTE.

Methods: PET/CT[2] scans from 11 patients with suspected tumor thrombosis were retrospectively evaluated. Suspicion arose from positive PET/CT in eight cases, or from findings on contrast-enhanced CT in three patients. Criteria for positivity of PET/CT included increased focal or linear uptake of 18F-FDG[3] in the involved vessel. Findings were categorized as PET/CT positive, or PET/CT negative and compared to contrast-enhanced or ultrasound Doppler, pathology where available, and clinical follow-up.

Results: Eight occult tumor thromboses were identified by PET/CT-positive scans. Underlying pathologies included pancreatic, colorectal, renal cell, and head-neck squamous cell carcinoma, as well as lymphoma (4 patients). Three thrombotic lesions on contrast-enhanced CT were PET/CT negative, due to VTE (2 patients) and leiomyomatosis. Accuracy of PET/CT to differentiate between tumor thrombosis and benign VTE was 100% in this small study.

Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced CT defines the extent of thrombotic lesions, while the functional information from PET/CT characterizes the lesions. It appears that PET/CT may be helpful in the diagnosis of occult tumor thrombosis and its differentiation from VTE.






[1] VTE = venous thromboembolism



[2] PET/CT = positron emission tomography/computed tomography


[3] FDG = fluorodeoxyglucose


 
February 2008
S. Davidson, N. Sokolover, A. Erlich, A. Litwin, N. Linder and L. Sirota

Background: Many centers in Israel still use pre-1970 reference data for neonatal weight, length and head circumference. A recently published population-based reference overestimated the weight of premature infants.

Objective: To develop a national reference for birth weight, birth length, and head circumference by gestational age for singleton infants in Israel.

Methods: Data were collected on all singleton live births documented in the neonatal registry of Rabin Medical Center from 1991 to 2005 (n=82,066). Gestational age estimation was based on the last menstrual period until 1977 and early fetal ultrasound thereafter. Neonates with an implausible birth weight for gestational age (identified by the rule of median ± 5 standard deviations or expert clinical opinion) were excluded. Reference tables for fetal growth by gestational age were created for males and females separately.

Results: The growth references developed differed markedly from the Usher curves currently used in our department. Compared to the recently published population-based birth weight reference, our data were free of the problem of differential misclassification of birth weight for gestational age for the premature infants and very similar for the other gestational age groups. This finding reinforced the validity of our measurements of birth weight, as well as of birth length and head circumference.

Conclusions: Use of our new (birth length and head circumference) and improved (birth weight) gender-specific hospital-based reference for fetal growth may help to define normal and abnormal growth in the neonatal population of Israel and thereby improve neonatal care and public health comparisons.
 

September 2007
S. Davidson, A. Litwin, D. Peleg and A. Erlich

Background: A paradoxical secular trend of an increase in preterm births and a decrease in low birth weights has been reported in many developed countries over the last 25 years.

Objective: To determine if this trend is true for Israeli neonates, and to add new information on secular trends in crown-heel length and head circumference.

Methods: A hospital-based historic cohort design was used. Anthropometric data for 32,062 infants born at Rabin Medical Center in 1986–1987, 1994–1996, and 2003–2004 were collected from the hospital’s computerized registry and compared over time for absolute values and proportional trends.

Results: For the whole sample (gestational age 24–44 weeks) there was a significant increase in mean birth weight (by 41 g), crown-heel length (by 1.3 cm), and head circumference (by 0.1 cm) from 1986 to 2004 (P < 0.001). A similar trend was found on separate analysis of the post-term babies. Term infants showed an increase in mean length and head circumference (P < 0.001), but not weight, and moderately preterm infants (33–36 weeks) showed an increase in mean weight (81 g, P < 0.001) and mean length (1.0 cm, P < 0.001), but not head circumference. The proportion of post-term (42–44 weeks), preterm (24–36 weeks), very preterm (29–32 weeks), extremely preterm (24–28 weeks), low birth weight (< 2500 g) and very low birth weight (< 1500 g) infants decreased steadily and significantly over time (P < 0.002).

Conclusions: Babies born in our facility, term and preterm, are getting bigger and taller. This increase is apparently associated with a drop (not a rise) in the proportion of preterm infants. These results might reflect improvements in antenatal care and maternal determinants.
 

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