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עמוד בית
Sat, 20.07.24

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July 2019
Maria Giovanna Danieli MD PhD, Denise Menghini MD, Cristina Mezzanotte MD, Chiara Gelardi MD, Veronica Pedini MD and Fernando Monteforte MD
December 2018
Maria Giovanna Danieli MD PhD, Chiara Gelardi MD, Veronica Pedini MD, and Armando Gabrielli MD
July 2017
Veronica Pedini MD, Isabella Savore MD and Giovanna Maria Danieli MD PhD

Background: Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary immune deficiency of adulthood. Besides recurrent infections, autoimmune disorders–mainly cytopenias–affect 30% of patients with CVID.

Objectives: To describe the efficacy and safety of facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin (fSCIg), which is a combination of 10% [human] SCIg with recombinant human hyaluronidase for the treatment of CVID-linked cytopenias. 

Methods: We describe four women (mean age 54 years) with CVID associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) (n=3) and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) (n=1). Diagnosis of CVID was made according to the European Society of Immune Deficiencies / Pan-American Group for Immune Deficiency criteria. All were treated with fSCIg (bi-monthly, 20 g).

Results: After a median follow-up of 22 months, all patients achieved a stable remission from the cytopenias, characterized by increased platelet values in ITP (mean values 93000/mmc), and resolution of anemia. A reduction of the daily prednisone dose was documented in the patient with AIHA. No systemic adverse drug reactions were observed. 

Conclusions: Our preliminary data documented the efficacy and safety of fSCIg in the treatment of CVID associated with autoimmune cytopenias, with a good tolerability. We also noted the role of fSCIg as a steroid sparing agent. It is thus possible to suppose an immunomodulatory role for fSCIg, but linked to different mechanisms than IVIg, due to the peculiar pharmacokinetic and administration route of fSCIg. 

 

July 2011
K. Machol, A. Vivante, M. Rubinsthein, B. Dekel, Joseph Danieli and G. Paret
November 2010
B. Chikman, R. Lavy, T. Davidson, I. Wassermann, J. Sandbank, N. Siegelmann-Danieli and A. Halevy

Background: Infiltrating ductal carcinoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma account for more than 90% of all invasive breast cancer histological types. The rate of ILC[1] is reported to be increasing steadily in the United States and Europe.

Objectives: To describe the trend in the incidence of ILC in a large cohort of patients who underwent surgery in a single institution over an 18 year period.

Methods: Our comprehensive database of 2175 consecutive patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed during the period 1992–2009 served for the analysis. Several potential factors associated with lobular carcinoma as compared with ductal carcinoma were evaluated.

Results: During this period, a 2.4-fold increase in the incidence of pure ILC was noted, from 4.6% in the years 1992–1994 to 10.9% in 2004–2006, followed by a modest decrease to 8.7% in 2007–2009. A significant association of lobular malignancies with external hormonal use was noted, including hormone replacement therapy exposure in patients diagnosed at age 50–64, and ovarian overstimulation during in vitro fertilization in those diagnosed at age 50 or less.  

Conclusions: Better diagnostic tools – such as the liberal use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging – and more accurate pathological definition for ILC type appear to influence the changes in the incidence of ILC in the subgroups of invasive breast cancer.






[1] ILC = infiltrating lobular carcinoma


September 2010
I. Jeroukhimov, N. Poluksht, N. Siegelmann-Danieli, R. Lavy, I. Wassermann, Z. Halpern, R. Gold-Deutch and A. Halevy

Background: One of the ominous complications following proximal gastrectomy or total gastrectomy is a leak from the esophagogastric or esophagojejunal anastomosis. An upper gastrointestinal swallow study is traditionally performed to confirm the anastomotic patency and lack of any leak before oral feeding can be initiated.

Objectives: To challenge the routine use of UGISs[1] following proximal or total gastrectomy in order to check the integrity of the gastroesophageal or jejunoesophageal anastomosis.

Methods: The charts of 99 patients who underwent PG[2] or TG[3]  for malignant pathology were retrospectively reviewed. UGISs were performed on day 6 following surgery using a water-soluble material.

Results: The UGISs were normal in 95 patients, with none displaying any complication related to the gastroesophageal or jejunoesophageal anastomosis. All four patients who experienced a leak from the anastomosis had an early stormy postoperative course.

Conclusions: Routine use of an UGIS to detect a leak following PG or TG is not justified. UGIS should be performed whenever signs of abdominal sepsis develop following this type or surgery.






[1] UIGS = upper gastrointestinal swallow study



[2] PG = proximal gastrectomy



[3] TG = total gastrectomy


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