• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Sun, 26.05.24

Search results


May 2012
J. Mejia-Gomez, T. Feigenber, S. Arbel-Alon, L. Kogan and A. Benshushan

For the past 15 years gynecological oncologists have been seeking ways to preserve woman’s fertility when treating invasive cervical cancer. For some women with small localized invasive cervical cancers, there is now hope for pregnancy after treatment. Many cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed in young woman who wish to preserve their fertility. As more women are delaying childbearing, fertility preservation has become an important consideration. The standard surgical treatment for stage IA2-IB1 cervical cancer is a radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. This surgery includes removal of the uterus and cervix, radical resection of the parametrial tissue and upper vagina, and complete pelvic lymphadenectomy. Obviously the standard treatment does not allow women future childbearing. Radical trachelectomy is a fertility-sparing surgical approach developed in France in 1994 by Dr. Daniel Dargent for the treatment of early invasive cervical cancer. Young women wishing to bear children in the future may be candidates for fertility-preservation options. The radical trachelectomy operation has been described and performed abdominally, assisted vaginally by laparoscopy and robotically. In this review we discuss the selection criteria for radical trachelectomy, the various possible techniques for the operation, the oncological and obstetric outcomes, and common complications.

 


February 2011
Y. Naaman, D. Shveiky, I. Ben-Shachar, A. Shushan, J. Mejia-Gomez and A. Benshushan

Background: Uterine sarcoma constitutes a highly malignant group of uterine tumors. It accounts for 2–6% of uterine malignancies and its incidence is 1.7 in 100,000 women. The three most common variants of uterine sarcoma are endometrial stromal sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma and carcinosarcoma. Based on relatively small case series, the literature provides little information on the risk factors, the natural course of the disease and the preferred treatment.

Objectives: To evaluate uterine sarcoma patients treated in a tertiary referral center in Israel over a 20 year period (1980–2005).

Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the charts of 40 uterine sarcoma patients, including their tumor characteristics, stage at diagnosis, treatment modalities, follow-up and survival.

Results: The patients’ mean age was 53 years (range 32–76); 30% of the patients had carcinosarcoma, 55% had leiomyosarcoma and 15% had ESS[1]. Half of the patients presented with stage I disease, 23% stage II, 10% stage III and 15% stage IV. Thirty-nine patients were treated by surgery. Adjuvant radiotherapy was administered to 39% of the patients, adjuvant chemotherapy to 21% and combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy to 9%. The mean follow-up period was 44 months, at which time disease had recurred in 44% of the patients. The disease stage was correlated with the 5-year survival rate, which was 73.1% for stages I-II and 22.2% for stages III- IV.

Conclusions: In accordance with other larger studies our data show that the only prognostic factor that was significantly correlated with prognosis was the stage of the disease at diagnosis. Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, survival has not improved over the last 25 years.






[1] ESS = endometrial stromal sarcoma



 
October 2002
Abraham Benshushan, MD, Avi Tsafrir, MD, Revital Arbel, MD, Galia Rahav, MD, Ilana Ariel, MD and Nathan Rojansky, MD

Background: Although Listeria monocytogenes is widely distributed in nature, it rarely causes clinical infection in previously healthy people. This microorganism. however, may cause severe invasive disease in pregnant women and newborns.

Objectives: To investigate – in our pregnant population – the impact, severity and outcome of listeriosis on both mother and fetus.

Method: The study was carried out at a level III, university two-hospital complex, In a retrospective chart review of 65,022 parturients during a 10 year period (1990-1999), we identified and: evaluated 11 pregnant patients and their offspring with Listeria infection;

Results: Chorioamnionitis with multiple. placental abscesses were observed in all five placentae examined. Clinically 4 of 11 parturients had a cesarean section for fetal distress (36.3%), as compared to the 14% mean CS rate in our general population. Two of 11 had a fate abortion (18.1%), as compared with the 4% rate in our hospital. Four of 11 had premature labor (36%), which was about four times the rate in our population. Finally, although no intrauterine feta1 death was recorded in our series, there was one neonatal death of a term infant. (1/11, 9%), which is about 10 times higher than our corrected perinatal mortality rate.

Conclusions: If not promptly and adequately treated, listeriosis in pregnancy may present serious hazards to the fetus and newborn through direct infection-of the placenta and chorioamnionitis.
 

Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel