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עמוד בית
Sat, 20.04.24

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November 2012
October 2010
Y. Ben Yehuda, S. Attar-Schwartz, A. Ziv, M. Jedwab and R. Benbenishty

Background: For health professionals who interact professionally with children, adequate awareness and training regarding the clinical indicators of child abuse and neglect, as well as subsequent reporting and procedures, are essential.

Objectives: To study Israeli health professionals’ experiences with identification and reporting of suspected cases of child abuse and neglect, and their perceived training needs in this area.

Methods: The study group was a convenience sample comprising 95 Israeli health professionals (physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, etc.) attending workshops on medical aspects at a national conference on child abuse and neglect. The study was a cross-sectional survey. The health professionals were asked to complete an anonymous structured questionnaire on their experience with child abuse and neglect and on their training needs.

Results: The participants in the survey had relatively high levels of involvement with child protection. Nevertheless, they strongly expressed their need for training, especially in mastering practice skills. The need for training was greater for professionals with less experience in child protection, and there were different needs according to profession.

Conclusions: Despite their prior extensive experience in dealing with child abuse and neglect, most of the health professionals participating in the conference reported the need for training in various areas.

September 2010
A. Soroksky, J. Lorber, E. Klinowski, E. Ilgayev, A. Mizrachi, A. Miller, T.M. Ben Yehuda and Y. Leonov

Background: Enteral nutrition in the critically ill patient is often complicated by gastrointestinal intolerance, manifested by a large gastric residual volume. The frequency of GRV[1] assessment and the intolerant level above which feeding is stopped is controversial.

Objectives: To evaluate a novel approach to EN[2] by allowing high GRV and once-daily assessment that was correlated with the paracetamol absorption test.

Methods: We conducted a pilot prospective study in an 18 bed general intensive care unit. The study group comprised 52 consecutive critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. Enteral nutrition was started at full delivery rate. Once-daily assessment of GRV with three consecutively repeated threshold volumes of 500 ml was performed before stopping EN. The paracetamol absorption test was performed and correlated to GRV. Patients were divided into two groups: low GRV (< 500 ml), and high GRV (at least one measurement of GRV > 500 ml). Clinical outcome included maximal calories delivered, incidence of pneumonia, ICU[3] length of stay, and ICU and hospital mortality.

Results: There were 4 patients (9.5%) with ventilator-associated pneumonia in the low GRV group and 3 (30%) in the high GRV group (P = 0.12). GRV was inversely correlated to paracetamol absorption; however, neither GRV nor paracetamol absorption was associated with the development of pneumonia. Both groups had similar ICU length of stay (11.0 ± 8.2 vs. 13.8 ± 14.4 days, P = 0.41), and similar ICU (21% vs. 40%, P = 0.24) and hospital mortality (35% vs. 40%, P = 1.0).

Conclusions: In critically ill mechanically ventilated patients, allowing larger gastric residual volumes, measured once daily, enables enteral feeding with fewer interruptions which results in high calorie intake without significant complications or side effects.






[1] GRV = gastric residual volume



[2] EN = enteral nutrition



[3] ICU = intensive care unit


August 2009
Y. Tal, G. Haber, M.J. Cohen, M. Phillips, A. Revel, D. Varon and A. Ben-Yehuda
December 2008
V. Gazit, D. Tasher, A. Hanukoglu, Z. Landau, Y. Ben-Yehuda, E. Somekh, I. Dalal

Background: Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is dominated by a Th1 response whereas atopic diseases such as asthma, eczema and allergic rhinitis are characterized by a Th2 response. Because it is known that Th1 and Th2 cells reciprocally counteract each other, it can be speculated that the prevalence of Th2-mediated diseases is lower in patients with a Th1-mediated disease.

Objectives: To compare the prevalence of atopic diseases among children with IDDM[1] and age-matched controls.

Methods: The study group comprised 65 children with IDDM attending the pediatric endocrinology clinic at the Wolfson Medical Center. The control group consisted of 74 non-diabetic children who presented at the emergency room due to an acute illness (burns, abdominal pain, fever, head trauma). Patients were asked to complete a detailed questionnaire on their history of personal and familial atopic and autoimmune diseases. In addition, a total serum immunoglobulin E concentration and the presence of IgE[2] antibodies to a panel of relevant inhalant allergens were analyzed.

Results: Children with IDDM and their first-degree relatives had a significantly higher prevalence of other autoimmune diseases such as thyroiditis and celiac as compared to controls. The two groups had a similar prevalence of atopic diseases with respect to history, total serum IgE, or the presence of IgE antibodies to a panel of relevant inhalant allergens.

Conclusions: The prevalence of atopic diseases in IDDM patients was similar to that in the normal population. Our results suggest that the traditional Th1/Th2 theory to explain the complexity of the immune response is oversimplified. 

 

 






[1] IDDM = insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

[2] Ig = immunoglobulin


October 2006
T. Cohen, Y. Krausz, A. Nissan, D. Ben-Yehuda, M. Klein and H.R. Freund
November 2002
Pesach. J. Shteper, MSc and Dina Ben-Yehuda, MD
September 2002
Ronen Durst, MD, Deborah Rund, MD, Daniel Schurr, MD, Osnat Eliav, MSc, Dina Ben-Yehuda, MD, Shoshi Shpizen, BSc, Liat Ben-Avi, BSc, Tova Schaap, MSc, Inna Pelz, BSc and Eran Leitersdorf, MD

Background: Low density lipoprotein apheresis is used as a complementary method for treating hypercholesterolemic patients who cannot reach target LDL[1]-cholesterol levels on conventional dietary and drug treatment. The DALI system (direct absorption of lipoproteins) is the only extracorporeal LDL-removing system compatible with whole blood.

Objective: To describe our one year experience using the DALI[2] system.

Methods: LDL apheresis was used in 13 patients due to inability to reach target LDL-C levels on conventional treatment. They included seven patients with familial hypercholesterolemia, three who had adverse reactions to statins, and three patients with ischemic heart disease who did not reach LDL-C target level on medical treatment.

Results: The average triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein-C and LDL-C levels before and after treatment in all patients were: 170 ± 113 vs. 124 ± 91, 269 ± 74 vs. 132 ± 48, 42 ± 8 vs. 37 ± 7.9, and 196 ± 77 vs. 80 ± 52 mg/dl, respectively. Comparing the results of a subgroup of seven patients who had previously been treated with plasma exchange, it is noteworthy that while the reduction in triglyceride, total cholesterol and LDL-C are comparable, the effect on HDL[3]-C concentration was less apparent: from an average of 39.7 ± 8.7 and 23 ± 5.7 mg/dl before and after plasma exchange to an average of 43.9 ± 8.1 and 38.4 ± 7 mg/dl before and after LDL apheresis, respectively. Five patients developed treatment-related adverse events: three experienced allergic reactions manifested as shortness of breath, urticaria and facial flushing; one patient developed rhabdomyolysis, an adverse reaction that was not reported previously as a result of LDL apheresis; and one patient had myopathy with back pain. All untoward effects occurred during the first few treatment sessions.

Conclusions: LDL apheresis using the DALI system is highly efficacious for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. It is associated with a significant number of side effects occurring during the first treatment sessions. In patients not experiencing adverse effects in the early treatment period, it is well tolerated, and can provide remarkable clinical benefit even after short-term therapy.

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[1] LDL = low density lipoprotein

[2] DALI = direct absorption of lipoproteins

[3] HDL = high density lipoprotein

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