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עמוד בית
Sun, 21.04.24

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January 2021
Yaakov Melcer MD, Shira Dvash MD, Ron Maymon MD, Marina Pekar-Zlotin MD, Zvi Vaknin MD, Tamar Tzur MD, and Noam Smorgick MD

Background: Adnexal torsion in pregnancy is often associated with functional adnexal cysts, especially in pregnancies conceived by ovulation induction (OI) or in-vitro fertilization (IVF). During laparoscopy for adnexal de-torsion, drainage of the functional cysts can be attempted, although this procedure may cause bleeding.

Objectives: To investigate the characteristics of ovarian torsion in pregnancy associated with functional cysts and to compare the rate of torsion recurrence following de-torsion alone versus cyst drainage.

Methods: All cases of surgically diagnosed adnexal torsion occurring during pregnancy between January 2007 and April 2019 in our department were retrospectively analyzed. The cases of torsion associated with presumed functional ovarian cysts were selected. The rate of recurrent torsion during the same pregnancy was compared for de-torsion alone versus de-torsion and cyst aspiration.

Results: Of the 113 women who experienced adnexal torsion during pregnancy, 71 (67.0%) of torsion cases were caused by presumed functional ovarian cysts. Among women with torsion of functional ovarian cysts, the rate of torsion recurrence was significantly higher in patients who underwent de-torsion alone (n=28) compared to women who underwent aspiration and drainage of the ovarian cysts (n=43) (14.3% vs. 0, P = 0.021). There were no cases of intra- or post-operative bleeding in the study cohort.

Conclusions: Functional ovarian cysts are the most common adnexal pathology encountered in pregnant women with torsion. Intra-operative cyst aspiration and drainage may reduce the risk of recurrent torsion. Further multi-center studies are required to validate our data prospectively.

March 2017
Marina Pekar-Zlotin MD, Yaakov Melcer MD, Orna Levinsohn-Tavor MD, Josef Tovbin MD, Zvi Vaknin MD and Ron Maymon MD
November 2015
Yaakov Melcer MD, Noam Smorgick MD, Zvi Vaknin MD, Sonia Mendlovic MD, Arieh Raziel MD and Ron Maymon MD

Background: Despite awareness regarding tubal pregnancy, ovarian pregnancy still remains a diagnostic challenge. The correct diagnosis is most frequently made intraoperatively and requires histopathologic confirmation. Therefore, additional diagnostic measurements are needed for earlier and more accurate detection of ovarian pregnancies which will allow more rapid and efficient treatment. 

Objectives: To assess the time trends, clinical manifestations, surgical management and post-procedure outcome of 46 primary ovarian pregnancies in a single institution during three time periods.

Methods: In this retrospective study we compared 20 patients with primary ovarian pregnancy during the years 1971–1989 (first period), 19 patients in 1990–2001 (second period) and 7 patients in 2002–2013 (third period). In all cases the pathology examination confirmed primary ovarian pregnancy.

Results: The number of tubal ectopic pregnancies almost doubled, from 637 in the first period to 1279 in the third period (P < 0.001). However, there was a significant fall in the number of ovarian ectopic pregnancies, from 20 cases in the first period to 7 cases in the third (P = 0.009). A significant difference was noted when we compared the postoperative hospitalization time (4.06 ± 1.4 vs. 2.0 ± 0.6 days respectively, P = 0.001) in the second versus the third time period.

Conclusions: Ovarian pregnancy continues to be a diagnostic challenge, associated with a high rate of circulatory collapse, hemoperitoneum and requirements for blood transfusions, all leading to longer hospitalization.

 

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