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עמוד בית
Fri, 31.05.24

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March 2021
Ariel Kenig MD, Ofer Perzon MD, Yuval Tal MD PhD, Sigal Sviri MD, Avi Abutbul MD, Marc Romain MD, Efrat Orenbuch-Harroch MD, Naama Elefant MD, and Aviv Talmon MD
January 2020
Ophir Ilan MD PhD, Yuval Tal MD PhD, Alon Y. Hershko MD PhD, Oded Shamriz MD, Emilie Bohbot MD, Shay Tayeb PhD, Daphna Regev M.Sc, Amos Panet PhD and Ron Eliashar MD

Background: Nasal polyps are three-dimensional structures arising from the mucosa of the upper airway. Due to their complexity, the reliability of single-layer cell cultures and animal systems as research models is limited.

Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of an ex vivo organ culture of human polyps, preserving tissue structure and function.

Methods: Nasal polyps were excised during routine endoscopic sinus surgery for chronic rhinosinusitis and polyposis. Fresh tissue samples were used for pathological evaluation and for the preparation of 250–500 µm sections, which were incubated in culture media. Tissue viability was assessed by visualisation of cilia motility, measurement of glucose uptake, and an infectivity assay. Cytokine secretion was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction before and after the introduction of steroids.

Results: Polyp tissue viability was retained for 2–3 days as demonstrated by cilia motility, glucose uptake and preserved cellular composition. Tissue samples maintained their capacity to respond to infection by herpes simplex virus 1 and adenovirus. Introduction of dexamethasone to cultured tissue samples led to suppression of interferon-g production.

Conclusions: The ex vivo nasal polyp organ culture reproduces the physiological, metabolic, and cellular features of nasal polyps. Furthermore, it shows a preserved capacity for viral infection and response to drugs. This system is a useful tool for the investigation nasal-polyps and for the development of novel therapies.

February 2018
Oded Shamriz MD, Mariana Druker Bsc, Tzahi Neuman MD MHA, Zvi Dranitzki MD and Yuval Tal MD PhD

Background: Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF) is a rare disease characterized by scleroderma-like skin, inflammation of deep muscle fascia, hypergammaglobulinemia, peripheral eosinophilia, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate.

Objectives: To present our experience in diagnosis and treatment of seven biopsy-proven EF patients in a large tertiary medical center.

Methods: We screened all patients who were admitted to our tertiary medical center and diagnosed with EF by tissue biopsies from January 2000 to January 2016. We analyzed relevant patient files regarding diagnosis, treatment, and outcome parameters. A comprehensive framework was presented based on the results of our observations and the corresponding literature.

Results: We identified seven patients (six males; one child). Mean age at diagnosis was 37.4 years (range 10–67 years). Underlying autoimmune disorders were observed in three patients (42.8 %). Disease anatomical distribution was noted in lower and upper limbs (85.7% and 57.1%, respectively) as well as neck and shoulders (14.3% each). Three patients (42.8%) had a history of initial misdiagnosis. The mean time period from first clinical presentation to histopathological diagnosis was 150.3 days (range 16–602 days). Treatment included oral glucocorticoids (71.4%), pulse methylprednisolone (14.2%), and methotrexate (42.8%). Recovery from symptoms related to EF was observed in six patients.

Conclusions: Diagnosis of EF is primarily based on clinical and histopathological findings. As eradication of this disease can be expedited with early treatment, it is important to increase awareness in the medical community.

June 2017
Ophir Eyal MD, Yuval Tal MD PhD, Arie Ben MD, Ofer N. Gofrit MD PhD and Mordechai Golomb MD
January 2017
Zev Sthoeger MD, Margalit Lorber MD, Yuval Tal MD, Elias Toubi MD, Howard Amital MD, Shaye Kivity MD, Pnina Langevitz MD, Ilan Asher MD, Daniel Elbirt MD and Nancy Agmon Levin MD

Background: Anti-BLyS treatment with the human belimumab monoclonal antibody was shown to be a safe and effective therapeutic modality in lupus patients with active disease (i.e., without significant neurological/renal involvement) despite standard treatment.

Objectives: To evaluate the “real-life” safety and efficacy of belimumab added to standard therapy in patents with active lupus in five Israeli medical centers.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective open-labeled study of 36 lupus patients who received belimumab monthly for at least 1 year in addition to standard treatment. Laboratory tests (C3/C4, anti dsDNA autoantibodies, chemistry, urinalysis and complete blood count) were done every 3–4 months. Adverse events were obtained from patients’ medical records. Efficacy assessment by the treating physicians was defined as excellent, good/partial, or no response.

Results: The study group comprised 36 lupus patients (8 males, 28 females) with a mean age of 41.6 } 12.2 years. Belimumab was given for a mean period of 2.3 } 1.7 years (range 1–7). None of the patients discontinued belimumab due to adverse events. Four patients (11.1%) had an infection related to belimumab. Only 5 patients (13.9%) stopped taking belimumab due to lack of efficacy. The response was excellent in 25 patients (69.5%) and good/partial in the other 6 (16.6%). Concomitantly, serological response (reduction of C3/C4 and anti-dsDNA autoantibodies) was also observed. Moreover, following belimumab treatment, there was a significant reduction in the usage of corticosteroids (from 100% to 27.7%) and immunosuppressive agents (from 83.3% to 8.3%).

Conclusions: Belimumab, in addition to standard therapy, is a safe and effective treatment for active lupus patients.

August 2015
Shmuel Chen MD PhD, Oded Shamriz MD, Ori Toker MD, Zvi G. Fridlender MD MSc and Yuval Tal MD PhD
June 2015
Yuval Tal MD PhD, Ido Weinberg MD MSc, Arie Ben-Yehuda MD and Mordechai Duvdevani MD
July 2014
Ori Toker MD, Ariella Tvito MD, Jacob M. Rowe MD, Jacob Ashkenazi MD, Chezi Ganzel MD, Yuval Tal MD and Meir Shalit MD
August 2009
Y. Tal, G. Haber, M.J. Cohen, M. Phillips, A. Revel, D. Varon and A. Ben-Yehuda
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