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עמוד בית
Wed, 19.06.24

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December 2022
Lior Charach MD, Gideon Charach MD, Eli Karniel MD, Dorin Bar Ziv MD, Leonid Galin MD, Weintraub M MD, Itamar Grosskopf MD

Background: APOE genotype strongly affects plasma lipid levels and risk for cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline. Studies of apo-e allelic and APOE genotype frequencies among several populations have revealed interesting ethnic variations that might affect cardiovascular morbidity and cognition deterioration.

Objectives: To evaluate apo-e allelic frequency among Israeli newborns based on known variances in apo-e allelic frequencies in different countries.

Methods: We examined 498 consecutive neonates born at Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center. Umbilical cord blood was sampled for genotyping and lipids. Birth weights were recorded. Demographics and parental risk factors for atherosclerosis were obtained from the mothers.

Results: Most parents were native-born Israelis. Other countries of origin of grandparents were Morocco, Russia, and Iraq. The prevalence of APOE genotypes in Israel is APOE 2/2: 1.4%, APOE 2/3: 8.2%, APOE 3/3: 77.7%, and APOE 4/4: 11.8%. There were no associations of APOE genotype with parental country of origin. However, there was a tendency for APOE 3/4 to be more frequent in newborns of parents of Asian and African origin. Genotype 3/3 was more frequent in newborns whose parents came from Europe and America (78%) compared to those from Asia or Africa (69%).

Conclusions: It is important to determine risk factors such as APOE genotype for evaluation of premature atherosclerosis. Determining genetic and environmental risk factors may facilitate earlier treatment and prevent heart and brain atherosclerosis. APOE genotypes did not appear to affect total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or triglyceride levels in newborns.

February 2020
Gideon Charach MD, Eli Karniel MD, Itamar Grosskopf MD and Lior Charach MD

Background: Internal thoracic impedance (ITI) measurement is a sensitive method for detecting preclinical pulmonary edema and pleural effusion.

Objectives: To investigate the efficacy of this non-invasive method for detecting early pleural effusion among geriatric patients and to monitor increased ITI during its resolution.

Methods: This prospective, controlled study was conducted between July 2012 and August 2015. The study comprised 70 patients aged 65 to 94 years; and 39 of the patients had pleural effusion. ITI was measured continuously with a RS-207 monitor. The predictive value of ITI monitoring was determined based on a total of eight measurements taken at 12-hour intervals over 84 hours.

Results: As a result of medical treatment, the median ITI of the study group increased from 31 (interquartile range [IQR] 28–33 ohms) to 41 ohms (IQR 38–41 ohms; P < 0.001) compared to non-significant changes in the control group. Average respiratory rate (per minute) in the study group decreased from 29 (IQR 28–34) to 19 (IQR 18–20).

Conclusions: ITI monitoring is efficient for diagnosis and for ongoing clinical evaluation of the treatment of elderly patients with pleural effusion. Timely treatment may prevent serious complications of effusions avoiding extended hospitalization.

June 2019
Mark Kheifets MD, Eli Karniel MD, Daniel Landa MD, Shelly Abigail Vons MD, Katya Meridor MD and Gideon Charach MD

Background: Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) is under-recognized by clinicians. It is characterized by nausea, severe abdominal pain, and cyclical vomiting in the context of chronic cannabis use. Oral benzodiazepine is a proposed treatment for CHS. It decreases activation of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor (CB1) in the frontal cortex, has a sedative and hypnotic effect and reduces the anticipation of nausea and vomiting. These effects on the central nervous system (CNS) might explain its beneficial antiemetic effect for this syndrome.

Objectives: To increase the index of suspicion for CHS, a unique syndrome that requires a unique treatment with benzodiazepines and not antiemetics.

Methods: We describe a series of four patients with documented cannabis use, who were admitted to an internal medicine department of Meir Medical Center due to symptoms consistent with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. They were initially treated with conventional antiemetics and proton pump inhibitors without response. Intensive investigations were conducted to exclude common and sometimes urgent gastrointestinal or CNS syndromes.

Results: After excluding urgent gastrointestinal and CNS origins for the vomiting, we suspected CHS. All four patients experienced similar symptoms and failure of conventional treatment with antiemetics and proton pump inhibitors. They experienced relief after administration of benzodiazepines.

Conclusions: A high index of suspicion for CHS allows for rapid, appropriate treatment with benzodiazepines, which in turn may lead to cessation of the debilitating symptoms caused by this syndrome.

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