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עמוד בית
Sun, 14.04.24

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December 2022
Tanya Ebert MD, Nimrod Goldschmid MD, Edmond Sabo MD, Efrat City-Elifaz MD

Background: School closures due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak affected students physically, socially, and psychologically with an increase in the number of children and adolescent presenting with anxiety, depression, and drug abuse.

Objectives: To examine the impact of COVID-19 and lockdown on the mental health of minors during the pandemic period and to characterize the type and number of referrals to a regional psychiatric outpatient clinic.

Methods: This study included 380 children evaluated in an outpatient child psychiatric clinic. They were divided into two groups: before the lockdowns (BLD) (n=248), from January 2019 to February 2020, and during the lockdowns (LD) (n=132), from March 2020 to April 2021.

Results: When comparing the LD to BLD, there was increase in suicide attempts (9.8% vs. 2.8%) and in the use of psychotherapy (81% vs. 56%). There was a decrease in the diagnoses of behavior disorders (29.5% vs. 44.8%) and ADHD (29.5% vs. 50%); as well as a decrease in stimulant usage (22.7% vs. 38%). There was a statistically non-significant increase in the number of children with depression, anxiety, and drug-use disorder.

Conclusions: Many children developed educational, social, emotional, and behavioral gaps during LD, and they lost skills to deal with everyday problems due to social isolation. It is important to follow the long-term impact of the lockdowns and social isolation.

May 2020
Mayson Abu Raya MD, Amir Klein MD, Edmond Sabo MD, Afif Yaccob MD MSc, Yaacov Baruch MD, Johad Khoury MD and Tarek Saadi MD

Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Several viral and host factors related to viral response have been reported in the era of treatment with pegylated (PEG)-interferon and ribavirin.

Objectives: To quantify histological findings from patients with chronic HCV using computerized morphometry and to investigate whether the results can predict response to medical treatment with peg-interferon and ribavirin.

Methods: We followed 58 patients with chronic HCV infection with METAVIR score F1 and F2 in our liver unit who were grouped according to treatment response sustained viral response (SVR) and non-SVR. Liver needle biopsies from these patients were evaluated and histological variables, such as inflammatory cells, collagen fibers and liver architecture, were quantified using computerized morphometrics. The pathologist who performed the histomorphometric analysis was blinded to previous patient clinical and histological information.

Results: Histomorphometric variables including the density of collagen fibers were collected. The number of inflammatory cells in the portal space and textural variable were found to be statistically significant and could be used together in a formula to predict response to treatment, with a sensitivity of 93% and a 100% specificity.

Conclusions: Histomorphometry may help to predict a patient's response to treatment at an early stage.

Gassan Moady MD MPH, Elias Daud MD, Ronen Galilee MD, Edmond Sabo MD, Salam Mazareb PhD and Shaul Atar MD
February 2020
April 2014
Tania Sezin MSc, Emily Avitan-Hersh MD, Margarita Indelman MSc, Roni Moscona MD, Edmond Sabo MD, Rina Katz MSc, Shimon Pollack MD and Reuven Bergman MD
 Background: Human amnion membrane (HAM) was suggested to be a superior antigenic substrate for immunoblotting in detecting autoantibodies of autoimmune bullous skin diseases.

Objectives: To determine the properties of HAM as an antigenic substrate for the detection of autoantibodies in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid.

Methods: Immunomapping and tandem liquid chromatography mass spectrometry were used to delineate the antigenic structure of HAM in 25 pemphigus patients, 41 pemphigoid patients, and 36 controls. Immunoblotting and indirect immunofluorescence were used to study the diagnostic utility of HAM, and the results were compared to those of indirect immunofluorescence on monkey esophagus, immunoblotting using normal human skin, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

Results: Immunomapping demonstrated the presence of all the antigens known to be targeted in autoimmune bullous skin diseases, in both normal human skin and HAM, except for the absence of BP230, and low threshold levels of Dsg1, Dsg3 and Dsc3 in HAM. HAM indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated anti-basement membrane zone antibodies in 48.7% of the pemphigoid patients, and anti-intercellular space antibodies in 72.0% of the pemphigus patients. HAM immunoblotting did not demonstrate anti-BP230 antibodies, but detected anti-BP180 antibodies in 53.6% of the pemphigoid patients. It did not demonstrate anti-Dsg1 and/or anti-Dsg3 antibodies in any of the pemphigus patients. These results were inferior to those of ELISA and monkey esophagus indirect immunofluorescence.

Conclusions: Compared to other studied methods, HAM does not offer advantages in detecting autoantibodies in bullous pemphigoid and pemphigus vulgaris. 

June 2004
E. Aizen, P.A. Feldman, R. Madeb, J. Steinberg, S. Merlin, E. Sabo, V. Perlov and I. Srugo

Background: Dysphagia is a common disorder among the elderly population. As many as 50% of nursing home residents suffer from dysphagia. It is important to identify patients at increased risk for colonization of dental and denture plaque by pathogenic organisms for prevention of associated disease.

Objectives: To quantify the prevalence and evaluate the effect of dental and denture plaque colonization by Candida albicans in hospitalized elderly dysphagic patients as a complication of stroke, as well as the effect of systemic antimicrobial therapy on C. albicans colonization in these patients.

Methods: We evaluated dysphagia and antibiotic therapy as risk factors for dental and denture plaque colonization by C. albicans in elderly stroke rehabilitating patients with dysphagia, as compared to elderly non-dysphagic stroke and non-stroke rehabilitating patients on days 0, 7 and 14 following admission to the Fliman Geriatric Rehabilitation Hospital.

Results: The risk of C. albicans colonization of dental plaque was greater in dysphagic patients than in those without dysphagia on day 0 (50% vs. 21%, P = 0.076), day 7 (58 vs. 15.2%, P = 0.008) and day 14 (58 vs. 15.2%, P = 0.08). Similarly, patients on antibiotic therapy were at greater risk for C. albicans colonization of dental plaque on day 0 (56 vs. 11%, P = 0.002), day 7 (44 vs. 14.8%, P = 0.04) and day 14 (39 vs. 19%, P = 0.18). The risk of C. albicans colonization of denture plaque as opposed to dental plaques in non-dysphagic patients was significantly greater on day 0 (45.7 vs. 21.2%, P = 0.03), day 7 (51.4 vs. 15.1%, P = 0.0016) and day 14 (54.3 vs. 15.1%, P = 0.0007). Dysphagia did not increase the risk of denture plaque colonization by C. albicans.

Conclusiona: Both dysphagia and antibiotic therapy are risk factors for C. albicans colonization of dental plaque, and although dysphagia does not significantly increase colonization of denture plaque, denture wearers are at greater risk of such colonization.

November 2003
January 2001
Ofer Nativ MD, Edmond Sabo MD, Ralph Madeb MSc, Sarel Halachmi MD, Shahar Madjar MD and Boaz Moskovitz MD

Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of using combined clinical and histomorphometric features to construct a prognostic score for the individual patient with localized renal cell carcinoma.

Patients and Methods: We studied 39 patients with pT1 and pT2 RCC who underwent radical nephrectomy between 1974 and 1983. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the association between various prognostic features and patient survival.

Results: The most important and independent predictors of survival were tumor angiogenesis (P=0.009), nuclear DNA ploidy (P=0.0071), mean nuclear area (P=0.013), and mean elongation factor (P=0.0346). Combination of these variables enabled prediction of outcome for the individual patient at a sensitivity and specificity of 78% and 89% respectively.

Conclusion: Our results indicate that no single parameter can accurately predict the outcome for patients with localized RCC. Combination of neovascularity, DNA content and morphometric shape descriptors enabled a more precise stratification of the patients into different risk categories.
 

December 2000
Ofer Nativ MD, Edmond Sabo MD, Moshe Wald MD, Sarel Halachmi MD and Boaz Moskovitz MD

Background: The free-to-total prostate-specificantigen ratio is the best marker for optimizing prostate cancer detection. The main problem with studies of percent free PSA is the variability of reported cutoff values.

Objectives: To evaluate the influence of prostate size on the ratio of free to total PSA.

Methods: The study group included 58 patients (mean age 66.4 years) with clinically localized prostate cancer treated surgically at our institution. Total PSA and free PSA levels were measured by a solid phase enzyme immunoassay test (Hoffman-La Roche, Basel, Switzerland). The percent free PSA was compared with prostate size as determined from the surgical specimen.

Results: A direct relation was noted between prostate size and the percent free PSA value (r=0.49, P=0.0001). Mean percentage free PSA was 9%0.004 in men with normal-sized gland while in men with large prostate (60 g) the average percent free PSA was 15.90.09 (P=0.001).

Conclusions: In patients with prostate cancer the percent free PSA level is influenced by the gland size. The larger the prostate the higher the proportion of the free PSA. Such information may have influence on the recommendation for prostate biopsy in screening programs for early detection of prostate cancer.

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