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עמוד בית
Sun, 14.04.24

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July 2019
Laura Andreoli MD PhD, Antía García-Fernández MD, Maria Chiara Gerardi MD and Angela Tincani MD

Rheumatic diseases commonly affect women of childbearing age, when women may be contemplating pregnancy or they discover an unplanned pregnancy. Therefore, specific issues about pregnancy planning and management are commonly encountered in patients during these times. Knowledge of the effect of pregnancy on disease activity is important for counseling. This review summarizes recent data on the course of different rheumatic diseases during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus are the most commonly investigated diseases. Data are increasing about spondyloarthritis. Sparse data are available for other rheumatic diseases. Despite the differences in these diseases and the various courses these disease take during pregnancy, a common feature is that active maternal disease in the months prior to conception increases the risk of flares during pregnancy, which in turn can lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Therefore, maternal and fetal health can be optimized if conception is planned when disease is inactive so that a treatment regimen can be maintained throughout pregnancy.

April 2016
Marília Rodrigues MD, Laura Andreoli MD PhD and Angela Tincani MD

Autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD) affect mainly young women during their reproductive years. Fertility is usually not diminished but the time it takes to conceive is usually longer. Factors related to an ARD or to its treatment are responsible for this effect. In addition, contraception counseling is required to prevent negative fetal outcome and exacerbation of disease symptoms. In recent years, advances in therapies, clarification of risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes, and a multidisciplinary approach have vastly improved obstetric management, increasing the possibility of successful pregnancy with a high likelihood of favorable outcome.

February 2015
Adam Austin MD, Angela Tincani MD, Shaye Kivity MD, María-Teresa Arango MSc and Yehuda Shoenfeld MD FRCP MaACR
October 2014
Laura Andreoli MD, Rossella Reggia MD, Lara Pea MD, Micol Frassi MD, Alessandra Zanola PhD, Stefania Cartella MD, Franco Franceschini MD and Angela Tincani MD
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