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עמוד בית
Wed, 22.05.24

ORIGINAL ARTICLES

IMAJ | volume 25

Journal 6, June 2023
pages: 392-397

Effect of Magnetic Resonance Imaging on Acute Surgical Treatment of Pregnant Patients: A Single Institution Study

1 Department of General Surgery and Traumatology, Hadassah Medical Organization and Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel 2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hadassah Medical Organization and Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel 3 Department of Radiology, Hadassah Medical Organization and Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Summary

Background:

Abdominal pathology in pregnant patients is a frequent challenge for emergency department physicians. Ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice but is inconclusive in approximately one-third of cases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming increasingly available, even in acute settings. Multiple studies have defined the sensitivity and specificity of MRI in this population.

Objectives:

To evaluate the use of MRI findings in pregnant patients presenting with acute abdominal complaints to the emergency department.

Methods:

This retrospective cohort study was conducted at a single institution. Data were collected on pregnant patients who underwent an MRI for acute abdominal complaints between 2010 and 2019 at a university center. Patient demographics, diagnosis at admission, ultrasound and MRI findings, and discharge diagnosis were recorded and evaluated.

Results:

In total, 203 pregnant patients underwent an MRI for acute abdominal complaints during the study period. MRI was found without pathology in 138 cases (68%). In 65 cases (32%), the MRI showed findings that could explain the patient's clinical presentation. Patients presenting with long-standing abdominal pain (> 24 hours), fever, leukocytosis, or elevated C-reactive protein values were at a significantly increased risk of having an acute pathology. In 46 patients (22.6%), MRI findings changed the primary diagnosis and management while in 45 patients (22.1%) MRI findings improved characterization of the suspected pathology.

Conclusions:

MRI is helpful when clinical and sonographic findings are inconclusive, leading to changes in patient management in more than one-fifth of patients.

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