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עמוד בית
Sat, 26.11.22

Original Articles

IMAJ | volume 21

Journal 9, September 2019
pages: 599-602

Traumatic Cataracts in Children, Long-Term Follow-up in an Israeli Population: A Retrospective Study

Summary

Background:

Ocular trauma in the pediatric population may lead to cataract formation. Managing traumatic cataracts in a visually immature child is a major challenge and can result in poor visual outcome.

Objectives:

To review our long-term surgical experience with childhood unilateral traumatic cataracts.

Methods:

A retrospective observational study of children with unilateral traumatic cataracts with minimal follow-up of 5 years was conducted. Main outcomes included final visual acuity (VA) and occurrence of complications.

Results:

Of the 18 children included in the study, 83% were male. Mean follow-up time was 12.5 years. Median age at injury was 7.5 years. Eleven patients (61%) presented with penetrating trauma injuries and 7 (39%) with blunt trauma. Sixteen patients (89%) had cataracts at presentation, while in two the cataracts developed during follow-up. Of the 18 total, cataract removal surgery was conducted in 16 (89%) with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation in 14 (87.5%), while 2 remained aphakic (12.5%). Two (11%) were treated conservatively. Long-term complications included IOL dislocation in 5 (36%), glaucoma in 8 (44%), and posterior capsular opacity in 10 (71%). No correlation was found between final visual acuity and the time interval between injury and IOL implantation nor between final VA and age at trauma. However, the final VA did correlate with time of follow-up.

Conclusions:

Severe complications occurred in over 30% of the patients during a long follow-up (mean 12.5 years). This finding shows the importance of discussions between the operating physician and the parents regarding the prognosis and necessity of scheduled follow-up.

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