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עמוד בית
Mon, 15.04.24

Original Articles

IMAJ | volume 19

Journal 7, July 2017
pages: 424-428

Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibody Diagnostics in a Large Cohort Tertiary Center: Should We Trust Serological Findings?

Summary

Background:

Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody disease, or Goodpasture’s disease, is the clinical manifestation of the production of anti-GBM antibodies, which causes rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with or without pulmonary hemorrhage. Anti-GBM antibody detection is mandatory for the diagnosis of Goodpasture’s disease either from the serum or kidney biopsy. Renal biopsy is necessary for disease confirmation; however, in cases in which renal biopsy is not possible or is delayed, serum detection of anti-GBM antibody is the only way for diagnosis.

Objectives:

To assess the predictive value of positive anti-GBM antibodies in a clinical setting. 

Methods:

Data from anti-GBM antibody tests performed at one medical center between 2006 and 2016 were systematically and retrospectively retrieved. We recruited 1914 patients for the study. Continuous variables were computed as mean ± standard deviation, while categorical variables were recorded as percentages where appropriate. Sensitivity and specificity of anti-GBM titers were calculated. Kaplan–Meyer analysis was performed, stratifying survival according to the anti-GBM antibody titers.

Results:

Of the 1914 anti-GBM test results detected, 42 were positive, 23 were borderline, 142 were excluded, and 1707 results were negative. Male-to-female ratio was 1:1.2. Sensitivity of anti-GBM test was 41.2% while specificity was 85.4%. Concerning the Kaplan–Meyer analysis, overall survival was 1163.36 ± 180.32 days (median 1058 days). 

Conclusions:

Our study highlights the lack of sensitivity of serological testing of anti-GBM titers. Comparing survival curves, the survival correlated with anti-GBM titer only in a borderline way. Because highly sensitive bioassays are not routinely used in clinics, renal biopsy is still pivotal for Goodpasture’s disease diagnosis.
 

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