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עמוד בית
Sun, 03.03.24

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May 2010
C. Stein-Zamir, G. Zentner, E. Tallen-Gozani and I. Grotto

Immunization coverage is a major health indicator. In Israel, routine childhood immunizations are provided at community public well-baby clinics. Immunization monitoring is an important cornerstone of a national health policy however, data obtained through sampling carries the risk of under-representation of certain population strata, particularly high risk groups. Despite high national average immunization coverage, specific sub-populations are under-immunized, as highlighted by outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. The mean national immunization coverage at age 2 years (2006 data) was: DTaP[1]-IPV[2]-Hib4[3] (all 93%), HBV[4]3 (96%), MMR1[5] (94%), HAV1[6] (90%). These reports are based on a 17% population-based sample in some districts and on cumulative reports in others. A national immunization registry requires data completeness, protection of confidentiality, compulsory reporting by providers, and links to other computerized health records. It should provide individual immunization data from infancy to adulthood and be accessible to both providers and consumers. In 2008 the Israel Ministry of Health launched a national immunization registry based on immunization reporting from well-baby clinics using a web-based computerized system. As of January 2010, 120 well-baby clinics are connected to the nascent registry, which includes the records of some 50,000 children. The implementation of a comprehensive national immunization registry augurs well for the prospect of evidence-based assessment of the health status of children in Israel. 

 
[1] DTaP = diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis

[2] IPV = inactivated polio vaccine

[3] Hib = Haemophilus influenzae b

[4] HBV = hepatitis B virus

[5] MMR = measles-mymps-rubella

[6] HAV = hepatitis B virus

December 2004
K.Y. Mumcuoglu, S. Magdassi, J. Miller, F. Ben-Ishai, G. Zentner, V. Helbin, F. Kahana and A. Ingber

Background: Head lice move easily from head to head. The lack of safe, effective repellents leads to reinfestation.

Objectives: To test the efficacy of a slow-release citronella formulation as a repellent against the head louse.

Methods: During 4 months in 2003 a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind clinical study was conducted in four elementary schools; 103 children were treated with the test formulation and 95 with a placebo.

Results: A significant difference was observed during the second examination 2 months later, when 12.0% of the children treated with the test repellent and 50.5% of those treated with placebo were infested with lice. A significant difference was also observed at the third examination 2 months later, when 12.4% of the children treated with the test repellent and 33.7% treated with placebo were infested. Overall, there were significant differences between those treated with the repellent and those treated with the placebo (15.4% and 55.1% respectively, P < 0.0001). Side effects were observed in 4.4% of children who disliked the odor of the formulation, and an additional 1.0% who complained of a slight itching and burning sensation.

Conclusions: Use of an effective repellent could significantly lower the incidence of reinfestations, which would lower expenditure on lice control, including pediculicides, combs and products for nit removal, and the time spent on treatment and removal of the nits.

October 2002
Kosta Y. Mumcuoglu, PhD, Jacqueline Miller, PhD, Chen Zamir, MD, MPH, Gary Zentner, FRACP, Valery Helbin, MD and Arieh Ingber, MD

Background: Head louse infestations are prevalent worldwide. Over the past 20-25 years, 15-20% of all children in Israel between 4 and 13 years of age have been infested with head lice; This is mainly due to the existence of ineffective pediculicides on the market.

Objective: To examine the pediculicidal efficacy and safety of a natural remedy (”Chick-Chack") and to compare it in an open clinical study with a known pesticide spray.

Methods: The natural remedy, which contains coconut oil, anise ail and ylang ylang oil:, was applied to the hair of infested.children three times at 5 day intervals. Each treatment lasted for 15 minutes. The control pediculicide was a spray, formulation containing permethrin, malathion, piperonyl butoxide, isododecane and propellant gas, which was applied twice for 10 minutes with a 10 day interva1 between applications.

Results: Of 940 Children, aged 6-14 years, from six schools in Jerusalem who were examined for head louse infestastion,199 (21:.2÷/) were infested with lice and eggs, while 164 (17.4% ) were infested only  with nits. Altogether, 119 children were randomly treated with either the natural remedy or the control product. Treatment was successful with the natural remedy  in 60 children (92.3%) and with the control pediculicide in 59 children (92.2%). There were no significant side effects associated with either formulation.

Conclusions: The natural remedy was very effective in controlling  louse infestations under clinical conditions and caused no serious side effects.
 

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