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עמוד בית
Fri, 30.09.22

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November 2018
Tatiana Dorfman MD, Mariya Neymark MD, Julia Begal MD and Yoram Kluger MD FACS

Background: Enlarged lymph nodes (ELN) pose a great diagnostic challenge. They may represent the first clinical finding of a hematologic disease or other malignancy and may be an indication of a wide range of infectious and non-infectious diseases. Because many patients undergo percutaneous biopsy, surgical excisional biopsy is not often considered.

Objectives: To analyze indications for a patient's referral for surgical biopsy of ELN and diagnostic steps to follow until referral, and to determine the number of ELN.

Methods: A retrospective study was conducted of prospectively collected data of patients who underwent surgical biopsy of ELN from January 2004 to December 2013.

Results: Of 118 patients who underwent surgical biopsy of ELN, only 52 (44%) had needle biopsy (NB) before referral. Lymphoma was diagnosed by NB in 24 (46%) of the referred patients. In patients with a previous diagnosis of lymphoma, NB of ELN yielded a sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 79%. In patients with lymphadenopathy but with no previous history of malignancy, sensitivity for lymphoma was 68% and specificity was 71%. The investigative time period until final diagnosis was 3 months in patients who had NB but only 1.25 months in patients who were referred directly for surgery (P < 0.0001).

Conclusions: Surgical biopsy of ELN still has a place in the clinical evaluation of patients with ELN. Surgery may significantly reduce the length of investigation and prevent unnecessary diagnostics, especially in patients with suspected lymphoma recurrence.

June 2013
O. Ben-Ishay, E. Brauner, Z. Peled, A. Othman, B. Person and Y. Kluger
 Background: Colon cancer is common, affecting mostly older people. Since age is a risk factor, young patients might not be awarded the same attention as older ones regarding symptoms that could imply the presence of colon cancer.

Objectives: To investigate whether young patients, i.e., under age 50, complain of symptoms for longer than older patients until the diagnosis of colon cancer is established.

Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, patients were divided into two groups: < 50 years old (group 1) and ≥ 50 (group 2). All had undergone surgery for left or right colon cancer during the 1 year period January 2000 through December 2009 at one medical center. Rectal and sigmoid cancers were excluded. Data collected included age, gender, quantity and quality of complaints, duration of complaints, in-hospital versus community diagnosis, pathological staging, the side of colon involved, and overall mortality. The main aim was the quality and duration of complaints. Secondary outcomes were the pathological stage at presentation and the mortality rate.

Results: The study group comprised 236 patients: 31 (13.1%) were < 50 years old and 205 (86.9%) were ≥ 50 years. No significant difference was found in the quantity and quality of complaints between the two groups. Patients in group 1 (< 50 years) complained for a longer period, 5.3 vs. 2.4 months (P = 0.002). More younger patients were diagnosed with stage IV disease (38.7% vs. 21.5%, P = 0.035) and fewer had stage I disease (3.2% vs. 15.6%, P = 0.06); the mortality rates were similar (41.9% vs. 39%). Applying a stepwise logistic regression model, the duration of complaints was found to be an independent predictor of mortality (P = 0.03, OR 1.6, 95% CI 1–3.6), independently of age (P = 0.003) and stage (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: Younger patients are more often diagnosed with colon cancer later, at a more advanced stage. Alertness to patients’ complaints, together with evaluation regardless of age but according to symptoms and clinical presentation are crucial. Large-scale population-based studies are needed to confirm this trend. 

April 2013
November 2012
May 2010
O. Ben-Ishay, P. Shmulevsky, E. Brauner, E. Vladowsky and Y. Kluger
August 2005
K. Peleg, Y. Kluger, A. Giveon, Israel Trauma Group, and L. Aharonson-Daniel

Background: The proportion of motorcyclists injured in road accidents in Israel is larger than their proportion among road users.

Objectives: To identify factors contributing to the risk of injury for motorcyclists as compared to drivers of other motor vehicles.

Methods: We retrieved and analyzed National Trauma Registry data on drivers, aged 16 and above, who were involved in traffic accidents and hospitalized between 1 January 1997 and 30 June 2003.

Results: The study group comprised 10,967 patients: 3,055 (28%) were motorcyclists and 7,912 (72%) were drivers of other motor vehicles. A multiple logistic regression revealed that Tel Aviv, the busiest metropolitan city in Israel, is a risk for motorcycle injury as compared to other regions; males have an increased risk compared to females; and age is a protecting factor since the risk of injury as a motorcyclist decreases as age increases. Nevertheless, the population of injured motorcyclists in Tel Aviv was significantly older (mean age 32.5 years vs. 28.6 elsewhere; t-test P < 0.0001). Twenty percent (n=156) of the injured motorcyclists in Tel Aviv were injured while working, compared to 9.5% (n=217) in other regions (chi-square P < 0.0001). Motorcycle injuries in Tel Aviv were of lower severity (7.7% vs. 16.4% according to the Injury Severity Scale 16+, c2 P < 0.0001), and had lower inpatient death rates (1.2% vs. 2.5%, c2 P = 0.001).

Conclusions: Tel Aviv is a risk for motorcycle injury compared to other regions, males have an increased risk compared to females, and age is a protecting factor. The proportion of motorcyclists in Tel Aviv injured while working is double that in other regions 
 
 
 
 
 

August 2001
Dan Bar-Zohar, MD, Yoram Kluger and Moshe Michowitz, MD, MSc,
July 2000
Ron Ben-Abraham MD, Avi A. Weinbroum MD, Yoram Kluger MD, Michael Stein MD, Zohar Barzilay MD FCCM and Gideon Paret MD

Background: General pediatricians in Israel are actively involved in the initial evaluation, resuscitation and management of traumatized children. However, pediatric trauma care is not a part of pediatric specialty training in Israel, and the few Advanced Trauma Life SupportR courses per year are insufficient for most pediatricians working in accident and emergency care.

Objective: To examine the value of the course in relation to the limited resources available for such training.

Methods: A telephone survey of 115 pediatricians who had taken the course between 1990 and 1994 was conducted. The responding physicians (67%) were asked to complete a specially designed questionnaire on life-saving procedures that were taught in the course. In addition, they were asked to subjectively assess the practical utility of the course.

Results: Forty-three (56%) pediatricians reported that they routinely treated both adult and pediatric trauma cases. Of these, 81% performed 27 life-saving ATLSR procedures. Pediatric trauma was treated by only 22 (28%), of whom 72.3% performed 18 life-saving ATLSR procedures. These pediatricians ranked the courses as being "very high" to "high" in impact.

Conclusions: These figures indicate that an ATLSR course designed specifically for pediatricians can markedly improve pediatric trauma care. To ensure standard education and patient care, such a course should be developed and made a mandatory component of residency training. Further studies to examine the objective impact of the courses on pediatric trauma care should be carried out.

_______________________________

 

ATLS= Advanced Trauma Life Support

Boaz Sagie, MD, Hanoch Kashtan, MD and Yoram Kluger, MD
March 2000
Ronen Rub, MD, David Margel, MD, Dror Soffer MD and Yoram Kluger, MD

Background: The course and outcome of appendicitis in the elderly differs from that of the general population. The rates of perforated appendices, error in diagnosis, postoperative complications and mortality may be related to the time lapse between onset of symptoms and admission, and hence delay in surgery.

Objectives: To evaluate if these factors have improved in recent years.

Methods: A retrospective study was carried out of all 61 patients over age 60 who underwent appendectomies in a major metropolitan hospital during 1988-98.

Results: We found that most patients had appendectomies within the first 24 hours of admission and within 3 days of symptoms. Rate of perforation was 43%, error 5.6%, morbidity 41%, and mortality 3.2%.

Conclusions: The high rate of appendix perforation in the elderly is not due to delay. The literature reveals little improvement in the statistics of the disease over the last five decades, despite advances in imaging and surgical technique. This may be explained by the increasing inclusion of octogenarian patients.
 

November 1999
Ron Ben-Abraham MD, Michael Stein MD, Gideon Paret MD, Robert Cohen MD, Joshua Shemer MD, Avraham Rivkind MD and Yoram Kluger MD
Background: Since its introduction in Israel, more than 4,000 physicians from various specialties and diverse medical backgrounds have participated in the Advanced Trauma Life Support course.

Objectives: To analyze the factors that influence the success of physicians in the ATLS®1 written tests.

Methods: A retrospective study was conducted of 4,475 physicians participating in the Israeli ATLS® training program between 1990 and 1996. Several variables in the records of these physicians were related to their success or failure in the final written examination of the course.

Results: Age, the region of medical schooling, and the medical specialty were found to significantly influence the successful completion of the ATLS® course.

Conclusions: Physicians younger than 45 years of age or with a surgical specialty are more likely to graduate the ATLS® course. The success rate could be improved if the program’s text and questionnaires were translated into Hebrew. 

1ATLS® = Advanced Trauma Life Support

September 1999
Ron Ben-Abraham, MD, Michael Stein, MD, Gideon Paret, MD, Avishy Goldberg, MD, Joshua Shemer, MD and Yoram Kluger, MD.
 Background: In the military environment it is the medics who usually provide the initial care of mass casualties in the field.

Objectives: To determine the number of incidents of trauma encountered by medics in the Israel Defense Forces during peacetime, and to ascertain the role of these medics in providing primary trauma care to the victims.

Methods: A retrospective questionnaire, reviewing the activities of medics in treating injured trauma victims, was distributed to medics who were in service for at least 2 years after their professional training.

Results: Of the 128 responding medics, 87 (68%) had actively participated in the treatment of trauma victims under various circumstances. The average number of trauma events was 1.2 events over a period of 2 years per combat medic, and 0.7 for medics stationed in rear units. Their activities included insertion of numerous intravenous fluid lines (57% of medics), assistance in intubations (37%), tube thoracostomies (23%), insertions of central catheters (14%) or orogastric tubes (28%), and manual ventilations (41%).

Conclusion: Since it is difficult to increase the level of practical experience in dealing with trauma within the military framework, new techniques should be applied to improve the trauma training.

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