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עמוד בית
Sun, 25.09.22

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August 2003
S. Luria, L. Kandel, D. Segal, M. Liebergall and Y. Mattan

Background: Revision of total knee arthroplasties are performed with increasing frequency due to the increasing numbers of primary arthroplasties.

Objectives: To retrospectively analyze 71 patients who underwent 78 revision total knee arthroplasties during the years 1991 to 1999

Methods: We evaluated the revised knees using the Knee Society Clinical Rating System after an average follow-up period of 3 years and 9 months (2–10 years). The indications for revision included pain and instability, deep infection of the joint, complaints linked to the patella, or post-trauma to the operated knee.

Results: The average knee score (evaluation of the knee joint itself) calculated after the revision was 74.5. The results on the knee score were excellent (>85) in 48% of patients and poor (<60) in 22%. The functional results (patients’ ability to walk and climb stairs) were only 48.3.

Conclusion: Although the revision of total knee replacements is known to be problematic, most patients show good results on knee examination, and reasonable functional results given the factors involved.

June 2002
Yoav Mattan, MD, Alice Dimant, MD, Rami Mosheiff, MD, Amos Peyser, MD, Steven Mendelson, MD and Meir Liebergall, MD

Background: Femoral hip fractures are a common occurrence in the elderly. Of the various fracture patterns, intertrochanteric injuries have the lowest rate of complications. Case reports of ensuing subcapital fracture have all been linked to incorrect placement of fixation devices or to osteomyelitis, while cases of avascular necrosis have only been reported rarely in the literature and are considered to occur at the rare rate of 0.8%.

Objectives: To check the incidence and outcome of AVN[1] in intertrochanteric hip fractures.

Methods and Results: In a retrospective analysis of patients who had surgical treatment for intertrochanteric fractures, 10 patients (0.5%) underwent dynamic hip screw fixation for intertrochanteric fractures and subsequently developed painful AVN as their primary presentation. Three of these patients were also found to have subcapital fractures. On revision of the primary fixation no fault was found with nail placement.

Conclusions: The reported rate of AVN may be understated since many patients have limiting factors that prevent them from consulting a physician when in pain, and one-third of these patients die within 2 years. Therefore, we suggest that hip pain following fixation of an intertrochanteric fracture should prompt the clinician to consider the rare possibility of AVN or subcapital fracture.

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[1] AV = avascular necrosis

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