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עמוד בית
Tue, 28.05.24

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July 2016
Mordechai Shimonov MD, Lior Leibou MD, Eduard Davidov MD, Olga Bernadsky MD, Julio Wainstein MD and Eyal Leibovitz MD

Background: Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection of the gastric mucosa may be involved in the development of insulin resistance (IR). 

Objectives: To investigate the association between HP status in stomach biopsies and weight reduction in patients who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). 

Methods: In this retrospective analysis of medical charts, all patients who underwent LSG for weight reduction and had at least 1 year of follow-up were included. HP status was ascertained by two to four biopsies of the removed stomach. 

Results: The study group comprised 70 patients; their mean age was 45.9 ± 11.9 years and 31.9% were males. Fourteen patients (20%) tested positive for HP colonization in gastric mucosa. HP status was not associated with age or smoking status. No difference was noted in the rate of diabetes mellitus (DM) or hypertension, but patients with HP had lower rates of hyperlipidemia (0 vs. 29 patients, 52%, P < 0.001). Patients lost an average of 10.5 kg/m2 after 12 months of follow-up, and no difference was noted between HP-positive and HP-negative patients. The rate of DM control was also similar between HP-positive and HP-negative patients at baseline (33.3 vs. 29.4, P = NS) and at 12 months of follow-up (70% vs. 50%, P = NS). 

Conclusions: HP status was not associated with changes in metabolic profiles and co-morbidity status, or in the efficacy of LSG. 

 

September 2013
M. Sadeh, B. Glazer, Z. Landau, J. Wainstein, T. Bezaleli, R. Dabby, A. Hanukoglu, M. Boaz and E. Leshinsky-Silver

Background: Type 1 diabetes in humans is an autoimmune disease in which T cells target pancreatic islets of Langerhans, leading to the progressive destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development of autoimmune diabetes. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of human type 1 diabetes demonstrates two missense mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor-1 (TRPV1) gene.


Objectives: To investigate whether polymorphism in the TRPV1 gene may play a role in the predisposition to human type 1 diabetes.

Methods: We genotyped 146 Ashkenazi Jewish type 1 diabetic patients and 205 Ashkenazi Jewish healthy controls for the rs222747 (M315I), rs224534 (T469I) and rs8065080 (I585V) variants of the TRPV1 gene.

Results: There was a significant increase in the rs222747 (M315I) variant of the TRPV1 gene in the type 1 diabetes cohort compared to the control: rs222747 (M315I) homozygous: (61% vs. 48.3%, P = 0.02). Logistic regression analysis revealed that type1 diabetes was significantly associated with rs222747 (M315I), such that having diabetes increased the odds of rs222747 homozygosity (M315I) by 67.2%, odds ratio 1.6, 95% confidence interval 1.08–2.57, P < 0.02. No difference was found in the rs224534 (T469I) and rs8065080 (I585V) allelic variants. There was no difference in any of the TRPV1 variants by gender, age when type1 diabetes was diagnosed, body mass index, glycemic control, blood pressure, positive autoantibodies (ICA, GAD, IAA), and other autoimmune diseases.

Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that TRPV1 may be a susceptible gene for type 1 diabetes in an Ashkenazi Jewish population. These results should be replicated in the same ethnic group and in other ethnic groups.

 

 

 

 

September 2011
J. Wainstein, E. Leibovitz, T. Segal and D. Gavish

Background: Control of diabetes is challenging, and frequent treatment changes are needed. 

Objective: To study the effect of the recommendation to start insulin glargine or insulin determir (long-acting insulin treatment, LAI) at discharge from hospital, on glucose control in the community setting.

Methods: Included were type II diabetes patients who were referred to and received a consultation from the hospital diabetes clinic during their hosptialization, as part of a routine consultation for diabetes management. During the visit, all patients were recommended long-acting insulin-based treatment, as inpatient treatment and at discharge. Follow-up was done by the primary physician in the community or by a community-based diabetes clinic. Glycosylated hemoglobin, glucose levels and other laboratory tests were obtained from the community health records before hospitalization and 612 months later. Medical treatment was ascertained by reviewing the actual usage of prescriptions.

Results: Eighty patients (58% males, mean age 64.1 ± 12.7 years) were included in the analysis. HbA1c levels were 10.1 ± 2.4% before admission, but improved significantly at follow-up (8.6 ± 2.2%, P < 0.001). Seventy-one percent of the patients were taking the LAI treatment and the rest were using non-LAI medications. Changes in diabetes control were similar between the LAI and non-LAI groups (HbA1c was reduced by 1.5 ± 3.2% and 1.9 ± 3.1% respectively). The rate of repeated admissions was also similar, averaging at 1.3 admissions for both groups, the minority of which were related to glucose control.

Conclusions: Insulin glargine or determir-based treatment does not show any superiority over other anti-diabetes treatment. It is our opinion that this treatment should be used as tailored therapy and should not be recommended routinely to all patients.
 

August 2010
December 2009
A. Nahmias, O. Tamir, I. Raz and J. Wainstein
May 2004
M.A. Abdul-Ghani, M. Sabah, O. Minuchin, P. Vardi, I. Raz and J. Wainstein
February 2003
M. Khamaisi, J. Wainstein, N. Hancu, Z. Milicevic and I. Raz

Patients with diabetes and/or insulin resistance syndrome are at increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease. The UKPDS raised a great debate about the relative importance of hyperglycemia in the development of cardiovascular disease. Recently, several epidemiologic studies have suggested that high postprandial blood glucose levels are associated with a significant risk for the development of cardiovascular disease as well as a grave prognosis for these patients during acute coronary events. In addition, a number of reports reinforce the thesis that postprandial hyperglycemia is a risk factor for mortality. Our review summarizes the current knowledge on the relation between blood glucose, insulin levels, and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, relating these data to the new World Health Organization and American Diabetes Association classification of disturbed glucose metabolism.

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