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עמוד בית
Fri, 31.05.24

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May 2014
Mihai Meirovitz MD, Dvir Gatt BSc, Jacob Dreiher MD MPH and Ruthy Shaco-Levy MD

Background: The "see and treat" approach, proceeding without a biopsy directly to uterine cervix conization in women diagnosed with high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HGSIL) on Pap smear, shortens the treatment duration, lessens patient anxiety, and reduces health care costs.

Objectives: To evaluate the level of diagnostic accuracy and the over-treatment rate in the "see and treat" versus conventional management of women diagnosed with HGSIL.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all women with HGSIL who had undergone the "see and treat" approach during 2001–2011 at Soroka University Medical Center. Similar cohorts, who were managed conventionally with a cervical biopsy prior to the conization, served as a comparison group.

Results: The study population consisted of 403 women: 72 (18%) had undergone the "see and treat" approach and 331 (82%) conventional management. The false positive rate was 11% for the "see and treat" group, compared to 6% for the conventional management group (P = 0.162). Similarly, no statistically significant difference was observed when comparing the positive predictive value (PPV) of high grade dysplasia diagnosed on Pap smear (PPV 88.9%) versus cervical biopsy (PPV 93.8%) (P = 0.204). Moreover, both the false positive rate and PPV remained similar in subgroups of patients, according to age, menopausal status, number of births, and colposcopy findings.

Conclusions: The accuracy level of HGSIL diagnosis on Pap smear is similar to that of high grade dysplasia on a cervical biopsy. We therefore recommend referring patients with HGSIL directly to conization. Skipping the biopsy step was not associated with significant over-treatment or other adverse effects. 

February 2011
L. Kogan, J. Menczer, E. Shejter, I. Liphshitz and M. Barchana

Background: The age-standardized incidence rate of invasive cervical cancer in Israeli Jewish women is persistently low. Selected demographic characteristics of Israeli Jewish women with cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) were reported recently. 

Objectives: To assess selected clinical characteristics of Israeli Jewish women with cervical SCC.

Methods: Included were all Israeli Jewish women with SCC diagnosed during the 3-year period 2002­–2004. Data were obtained from the Israel National Cancer Registry and the Central Population Registry. Discharge summaries of the patients were reviewed and clinical data were abstracted.

Results: The study was based on 350 Israeli Jewish women with histologically confirmed cervical SCC diagnosed during the 3-year study period. The median age of the patients was 50.3 years. The most common main complaint was discharge/bleeding (35.7%) and only a small percentage (7.4%) was diagnosed subsequent to an abnormal cytological smear. The rate of patients diagnosed in stage I was 47.7%. The overall absolute 5-year survival and survival in stage I was 70% and 83.8% respectively. The rate of Israeli born patients diagnosed in stage I and their overall absolute 5-year survival was significantly higher than in the other ethnic groups.

Conclusions: Age, the most frequent main complaint, the percent of patients diagnosed in stage I and the 5-year survival (overall and in stage I) are similar to data in other countries. The survival of Israeli born women seems to be better than that of other ethnic groups.
 

December 2010
S. Lurie, H. Asaala, O. Schwartz Harari, A. Golan and O. Sadan

Background: Although the presence of bacteria in the cervix is not a sign of disease, the majority of pathogens involved in pelvic inflammatory disease originate from this "normal" flora.

Objectives: To assess the distribution of cervical non-gonococcal and non-chlamydial bacteria in hospitalized women with PID[1] and the bacteria's antibiotic sensitivity.

Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the cultures obtained from the uterine cervix over a 1 year period (2008) at Wolfson Medical Center, Holon. The distribution of cervical non-gonococcal and non-chlamydial bacteria in women with PID and the bacteria's antibiotic sensitivity was compared to that in our previous 1 year study that was performed at Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot (1988–89). 

Results: In 2008, a total of 412 cultures were obtained of which 126 (30.5%) were sterile. The prevalence of negative cultures was similar in 2008 and in 1988, namely, 30.5% and 33.7%, respectively (P = 0.23). PID was finally diagnosed in 116 patients with positive cultures. The most prevalent bacteria in the 2008 study were Enterococcus species and Escherichia coli – 24.0 % and 26.4% respectively compared to 18.0% and 38.1% in the 1988 study, with the decrease in E. coli isolates being significant (P = 0.0003). In 2008 the antimicrobial sensitivity for various antibiotics ranged from 44.3% to 100.0% (median 90.2%) while in 1988 it ranged from 2.9% to 80.1% (median 51.9%).

Conclusions: The cervical bacterial flora in hospitalized women with PID did not vary significantly between 1988 and 2008. However, antimicrobial sensitivity of the isolated bacteria increased dramatically, probably due to a decrease in resistance to antibiotics.






[1] PID = pelvic inflammatory disease


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