• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Sun, 21.04.24

Search results


January 2023
Elad Leron MD, Anthony Riches MD, Menahem Neuman MD, Offer Erez MD, Jacob Bornstein MD

Background: Serasis® (Serag-Wiessner KG, Naila, Germany) is a light-weight mid-urethral sling for treating stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Its insertion is considered less traumatic than other mid-urethral slings.

Objectives: To define postoperative outcomes following Serasis implantation. To compare the efficacy and complication rates of the implant to those of other common techniques.

Methods: Our retrospective study evaluated patients who underwent Serasis mid-urethral sling surgery for SUI. Data were collected from medical records prior to and at the time of surgery and by telephonic interview for postoperative pain and complications. Follow-up of patients was performed for up to one year postoperatively. Patients rated pain or discomfort according to the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The primary outcome was the development of early postoperative pain during the first month after surgery. Secondary outcomes were relief of SUI symptoms, groin pain or discomfort, and other postoperative complications up to 12 months after surgery.

Results: The study cohort included 50 consecutive patients aged 31 to 68 years. All patients underwent Serasis implantation procedures by a single surgeon and completed interviews. In total, 35 patients underwent concomitant anterior colporrhaphy. In the immediate postoperative period and at one month after the procedure, complaints were mild. No complaints were recorded during the 12-month follow-up period. Overall, 90% and 92% of the patients were free of SUI symptoms at one month and 12 months after surgery, respectively.

Conclusions: Serasis mid-urethral sling is safe, effective, and associated with mild postoperative pain and a low incidence of complications.

Anis Kaldawy MD, Nadav Cohen MD, Wisam Assaf, Meirav Schmidt MD, Ofer Lavie MD, Yoram Abramov MD

Background: Diagnosing occult stress urinary incontinence (OSUI) prior to surgical intervention for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) repair may allow for adding an anti-incontinence procedure and thus prevent postoperative SUI.

Objectives: To compare preoperative detection rates for OSUI by either a multichannel urodynamic investigation or by a plain pelvic examination.

Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the medical charts of all women who underwent urodynamic investigation prior to surgical repair of advanced POP at our institution between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2012.

Results: In total, 720 women underwent surgical POP repair during the study period, of whom 54 (7.5%) were diagnosed with OSUI preoperatively. Of these patients, 54 (100%) were detected by multichannel urodynamic investigation while only 27 (50%) were detected by a plain pelvic examination (P = 0.001). Bladder fullness during the pelvic examination was associated with higher detection rates for OSUI (P = 0.001). Women with OSUI who underwent concomitant tension-free vaginal tape and POP repair procedures did not develop de novo SUI or obstructive voiding symptoms (OVS) postoperatively.

Conclusions: Preoperative multichannel urodynamic investigation has significantly higher detection rates for OSUI than a plain pelvic examination. Utilizing this modality resulted in no cases of de novo SUI or OVS postoperatively.

Alla Saban MD MPH, Adi Y. Weintraub MD

Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), defined as involuntary leakage of urine associated with increased intra-abdominal pressure during an effort such as sneezing or coughing, is a highly prevalent condition that affects women of all ages and impacts a women's quality of life (QoL). The prevalence of SUI reaches 14% in younger women and up to 35% in older women. Vaginal deliveries, gravidity, advanced age, menopause status, obesity, diabetes, and ethnicity are known risk factors for SUI [1].

Reut Rotem MD MPH, Adi Y. Weintraub MD

The prevalence of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) varies greatly and is reported to be between 3% and 50% differing greatly when based on POP symptoms or vaginal examination [1]. Age is a well-established risk factor in the reported prevalence of POP [2]. With advancing age, the prevalence escalates dramatically, from 6% at age of 30 years to over 50% at the age of 80 years [3]. The increase in life expectancy observed in recent years will most probably be accompanied by a respective increase in the absolute numbers of women presenting with POP [4]. POP is a major health burden and is expected to continue being so in the upcoming future; hence, the importance of a safe and efficient treatment.

June 2015
Ada Rosen MD, Lee Taragano, Alexander Condrea MD, Ami Sidi MD, Yshai Ron MD

Background: Fecal incontinence is defined as involuntary passage of stool through the anus. It may vary from soiling to complete evacuation. This involuntary loss of feces, flatus or urge incontinence adversely affects quality of life. Urinary urge incontinence is characterized by symptoms of frequency, urgency and urge incontinence (either alone or in combination). Urgency frequency syndrome is defined as symptoms of frequency and urgency without incontinence episodes.

Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of sacral neuromodulation on these pathologies. 

Methods: Following a detailed investigation, 51 patients with either urinary or fecal incontinence, or both, who did not respond to medical and behavioral treatment were offered the temporary implant. Of the 51 patients 40 showed improvement and advanced for a permanent device.

Results: After a mean follow-up of 5 years (range 1–8), there was a significant reduction in the number of incontinence episodes (P < 0.0001), and the number of pads used also declined significantly (P < 0.0001). A marked improvement in quality of life was reported by 71.4% of the women and 58.3% of the men.

Conclusions: Sacral neuromodulation as shown in this study appears to be a promising treatment for urinary and fecal incontinence and can dramatically improve patients' quality of life.

 

March 2013
S. Eilat-Tsanani, H. Tabenkin, J. Shental, I. Elmaleh and D. Steinmtz
 Background: Radical prostatectomy is one option for treating localized prostate cancer, but it can cause functional impairment of the urogenital system.

Objectives: To describe the outcomes of radical prostatectomy as perceived by the patients, and their ways of coping with them.

Methods: We conducted a qualitative study of 22 men with localized prostatic cancer 1 year after surgery. The key questions related to the effect of the disease and the surgery on their lives and their view on the value of the surgery.

Results: The surgery was perceived as a necessary solution for the diagnosed cancer. All the participants suffered from varying degrees of urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Urinary incontinence caused severe suffering. The impaired sexual ability affected relations with partners and led to feelings of shame and guilt and a decreased sense of self-esteem. In retrospect, the participants still viewed the surgery as a life-saving procedure. Faith in the surgeon contributed to their affirmation of the decision to undergo surgery despite the difficulties.

Conclusions: Patients were prepared to suffer the inevitable physical and psychological sequelae of radical prostatectomy because they believed the surgery to be a definitive solution for cancer. Surgeons advising patients with localized prostatic cancer on treatment options should address these difficult issues and provide psychological support, either themselves or in collaboration with professionals.

 

October 2004
E. Gnessin, P.M. Livneh, J. Baniel and G. Gillon
Background: Sphincter-related incontinence after radical prostatectomy, benign prostatectomy or due to neurogenic disease has a considerable negative impact on quality of life. Artificial urinary sphincter implantation is a mainstay therapeutic option for these patients.

Objectives: To assess patient satisfaction, subjective long-term continence and complications after AMS 800 artificial urinary sphincter implantation.

Methods: The medical records of 34 patients who underwent artificial urinary sphincter implantation for radical prostatectomy (n=23), simple prostatectomy (n=9) or neurogenic disease (n=2) between 1995 and 2003 were studied retrospectively. Median follow-up was 49 months (range 3–102 months). Records were analyzed for urinary sphincter survival and complications. Quality of life and continence assessment was done by mailing an impact questionnaire.

Results: In 4 of the 34 patients (11.7%) the device was removed due to infection. One of the four had surgical revision elsewhere, and the other three were not interested in re-implantation of the device. Two patients (5.9%) underwent revisions due to mechanical failure. One patient died and three patients were not located. Twenty-seven out of a possible 30 patients (88%) completed the questionnaire; 22 (85%) achieved social continence (0–2 pads daily), and one patient had subjective difficulty activating the device. Subjective improvement and patient satisfaction was rated as 4.22 and 4.11, respectively (scale 0 to 5).
Conclusions: Artificial urinary sphincter implantation is an efficacious option for sphincter-related incontinence. This study documents the positive impact of artificial urinary sphincter implantation on quality of life with acceptable complications; these results are comparable to other published studies.

September 2001
Slomo Vinker, MD, Boris Kaplan, MD, Sasson Nakar, MD, Gita Samuels, MD, Gidon Shapira, MD and Eliezer Kitai, MD

Background: Urinary incontinence in older women is common. Its characteristics and impact on quality of life is not well established since these women are usually reluctant to tell their healthcare providers about the problem.

Objective: To determine the characteristics of urinary incontinence in women and the manner in which it affects patients quality of life.

Methods: Twenty family physicians were requested to distribute a questionnaire to the first 25 consecutive women aged 30 to 75 years who visited their clinic for any reason. The questionnaire covered general health issues, symptoms of urinary incontinence, and quality of life.

Results: A total of 418 women, mean age 50.0 ± 11.8 years, completed the questionnaire (84% response rate). Of these, 148 (36%) reported having episodes of urinary incontinence. Urinary incontinence was found to be associated with older age, menopause, obesity and coexisting chronic disorders. Sixty percent of the women with urinary incon­tinence found it to be a disturbing symptom, and 44% reported that it had a detrimental effect on their quality of life. Only 32% of the affected women had sought medical advice, half of them from their family physician. Treatment was recommended to 66% of those who sought help, and in about two-thirds of these it brought some measure of relief.

Conclusions: Urinary incontinence is a common com­plaint among women attending primary care clinics, but it does not receive appropriate attention, Though it often adversely affects quality of life, only a small proportion of women seek medical advice. Family physicians should raise the issue as a part of the routine general health check-up.
 

Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel