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עמוד בית
Fri, 21.06.24

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April 2024
Kassem Sharif MD, Adi Lahat MD, Yonatan Shneor Patt MD, Niv Ben-Shabat MD, Mahmud Omar MD, Abdulla Watad MD, Howard Amital MD MHA, Omer Gendelman MD

Background: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are chronic conditions with overlapping pathogenic mechanisms. The genetic predisposition and inflammatory pathways common to both diseases suggest a syndemic relationship. While some evidence points to a connection between the two conditions, other reports do not support this link.

Objectives: To investigate the association between AS and the subsequent incidence of IBD. To identify potential risk factors and effect modifiers that contribute to this relationship.

Methods: Utilizing the Chronic Disease Registry of Clalit Health Services, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of individuals diagnosed with AS between January 2002 and December 2018. We compared these patients with age- and sex-matched controls, excluding those with a prior diagnosis of IBD. Statistical analyses included chi-square and t-tests for demographic comparisons, and Cox proportional hazards models for evaluating the risk of IBD development, with adjustments for various co-morbidities and demographic factors.

Results: The study included 5825 AS patients and 28,356 controls. AS patients demonstrated a significantly higher incidence of IBD with hazard ratios of 6.09 for Crohn's disease and 2.31 for ulcerative colitis, after multivariate adjustment. The overall incidence of IBD in the AS cohort was significantly higher compared to controls.

Conclusions: AS patients exhibit a markedly increased risk of developing IBD. These findings advocate for heightened clinical vigilance for IBD symptoms in AS patients and suggest the need for a multidisciplinary approach to patient care. Further research into the shared pathogenic pathways is needed to develop personalized treatment strategies and improve patient management.

March 2024
Jill Savren Lotker MD, Ariel Roguin MD PhD, Arthur Kerner MD, Erez Marcusohn MD, Ofer Kobo MD PhD

Background: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

Objectives: To compare the clinical outcomes within 30 days, one year, and five years of undergoing PCI.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with IBD who underwent PCI in a tertiary care center from January 2009 to December 2019.

Results: We included 44 patients, 26 with Crohn’s disease (CD) and 18 with ulcerative colitis (UC), who underwent PCI. Patients with CD underwent PCI at a younger age compared to UC (57.8 vs. 68.9 years, P < 0.001) and were more likely to be male (88.46% of CD vs. 61.1% of UC, P < 0.03). CD patients had a higher rate of non-steroidal treatment compared to UC patients (50% vs. 5.56%, P < 0.001). Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and/or the need for revascularization (e.g., PCI) were the most common clinical events to occur following PCI, in both groups. Of patients who experienced ACS and/or unplanned revascularization within 5 years, 25% of UC vs. 40% of CD had target lesion failure (TLF) due to in-stent restenosis and 10% of CD had TLF due to stent thrombosis.

Conclusions: We observed higher rates of TLF in IBD patients compared to the general population as well as differences in clinical outcomes between UC and CD patients. A better understanding of the prognostic factors and pathophysiology of these differences may have clinical importance in tailoring the appropriate treatment or type of revascularization for this high-risk group.

March 2021
Yaron Niv MD AGAF FACG

Hospitalization of ulcerative colitis patients is needed in severe exacerbation of the disease or for managing complications. In this systematic review and meta-analysis the prevalence of hospitalization in ulcerative colitis and possible predictive factors are discussed. A systematic literature search of English language publications that were published before 31 December 2019 was conducted. Retrospective cohort studies describing hospitalizations of UC patients were included. Meta-analysis was performed by using comprehensive meta-analysis software. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) were calculated for the number of patients hospitalized. Seven studies and 15 datasets were found that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. In total, the studies included 2067 patients from six countries. The event rates for the number of patients hospitalized in a follow-up duration of 42,320 patient-years and for the number of patients underwent operation in a follow-up of 24,650 patient-years were 0.065 (95%CI 0.063–0.068) and 0.019 (95%CI 0.017–0.021), respectively. More studies during the era of biologics need to be performed to identify the factors predictive of hospitalization and surgery with UC. Prevention of inflammation and UC complications may prevent hospitalization and the need for surgical treatment

October 2019
Mahmud Mahamid MD, Ariella Bar-Gil Shitrit MD, Hana Amara MD, Benjamin Koslowsky MD, Rami Ghantous RN and Rifaat Safadi MD

Background: Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are the two major classic presentations of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Studies have shown a wide variation in the incidence and prevalence attributed to different geographic and ethnic populations.

Objectives: To assess the clinical characteristics of IBD among Arabs in Israel and to compare them to characteristics of IBD among Ashkenazi Jews.

Methods: This retrospective, comparative study compared the clinical characteristics of IBD among 150 Arabs from the Holy Family Hospital and the Nazareth Hospital EMMS, both located in Nazareth, Israel, to those of 97 age- and sex-matched Ashkenazi Jewish patients from Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.

Results: The Arab cohort, which included 106 patients (70%) with Crohn's disease and 44 (29%) with ulcerative colitis, was compared to 97 Ashkenazi patients (81% with Crohn's disease and 17% with ulcerative colitis) (P < 0.05). Alcohol consumption was found in both groups, but Arabs smoked more (46% vs. 12%, respectively, P < 0.05). Obstructive phenotype was lower in Arabs (10% vs. 32%, P < 0.05). 5-aminosalicylic acid and anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha were prescribed for the Arab and Ashkenazi groups (89% and 21%, respectively). The need for surgical intervention due to disease severity and/or complications was not significant (22% vs. 24%).

Conclusions: Despite similar reports of NOD2/CARD15 mutations, Crohn's disease is more common than ulcerative colitis within the Arab-Israeli population. Increased smoking rates may explain milder disease severities in Arabs, as reflected by lower obstructive pattern and frequent use of milder therapeutic modalities.

March 2019
Ibrahim Zvidi MD, Doron Boltin MBBS, Yaron Niv MD, Ram Dickman MD, Gerald Fraser MD and Shlomo Birkenfeld MD

Background: Temporal trends in the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the Arab and Jewish populations in Israel have been poorly described.

Objectives: To compare the annual incidence and prevalence rates of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in the Arab and Jewish populations in Israel between the years 2003 and 2008.

Methods: We applied a common case identification algorithm to the Clalit Health Services database to both determine trends in age-adjusted incidence and prevalence rates for IBD in both populations during this period and estimate the burden of IBD in Israel.

Results: The incidence of CD in the Arab population increased from 3.1/100,000 in 2003 to 10.6/100,000 person-years in 2008, compared with a decrease in the Jewish population from 14.3/100,000 to 11.7/100,000 person-years for the same period. The incidence of UC in the Arab population increased from 4.1/100,000 in 2003 to 5.0/100,000 person-years in 2008, a low but stable rate, compared with a decrease from 16.4/100,000 to 9.5/100,000 person-years for the same time period in the Jewish population. The prevalence of both diseases increased due to the accumulation of incident cases but remained much lower among Arabs.

Conclusions: Understanding the factors underlying the differences in incidence and prevalence of IBD in the Jewish and Arab populations may shed light on the genetic and environmental factors associated with these diseases.

October 2016
Ofir Har-Noy MD, Bun Kim MD, Rivi Haiat, Tal Engel MD, Bella Ungar MD, Rami Eliakim MD, Won Ho Kim MD, Jae Hee Cheon MD PhD and Shomron Ben-Horin MD

Background: Although 5-amino-salycilic acids (5-ASA) are often used with corticosteroid treatment in moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis, the value of continuing/initiating 5-ASA in this clinical setting has not been explored. 

Objectives: To investigate the impact of a combination 5-ASA+corticosteroid therapy on the outcome of hospitalized patients with acute moderate-severe ulcerative colitis. 

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of patients hospitalized with moderate-severe ulcerative colitis in two centers, Israel and South Korea. Patients were classified into those who received 5-ASA and corticosteroids and those who received corticosteroids alone. Analysis was performed for each hospitalization event. The primary outcome was the rate of treatment failure defined as the need for salvage therapy (cyclosporin-A/infliximab/colectomy). The secondary outcomes were 30 days re-admission rates, in-hospital mortality rates, time to improvement, and length of hospitalization. 

Results: We analyzed 209 hospitalization events: 151 patients (72%) received 5-ASA+corticosteroids and 58 (28%) corticosteroids alone. On univariate analysis the combination therapy group had a lower risk for treatment failure (11% vs. 31%, odds ratio 0.28, 95% confidence interval 0.13–0.59, P = 0.001). However, this difference disappeared on multivariate analysis, which showed pre-admission oral corticosteroid treatment to be the most significant factor associated with the need for salvage therapy. 

Conclusions: A signal for possible benefit of a combination 5-ASA and corticosteroids therapy was found, but was confounded by the impact of pre-admission corticosteroid treatment. 

 

Naseem Shadafny MD, Samuel N. Heyman MD, Michael Bursztyn MD, Anna Dinaburg MD, Ran Nir-Paz MD and Zvi Ackerman MD
February 2011
G. Altarescu, D. Rachmilewitz and S. Zevin

Background: Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a common and difficult-to-treat disease. In non-smokers the relative risk of developing UC[1] is 2.9 compared with smokers, who tend to have a later onset and a milder disease. Nicotine is the component of cigarette smoke responsible for the favorable effects in UC. Nicotine is metabolized by the enzyme CYP2A6. Subjects who are homozygotes for CYP2A6*4 gene polymorphism are poor nicotine metabolizers, while homozygotes for CYP2A6*1A polymorphism are extensive metabolizers.

Objectives: To compare the frequency of CYP2A6 and CHRNA3 polymorphisms among smokers and non-smokers with UC, and their effect on disease severity.

Methods: Data on the age at onset of disease, disease activity, and treatment were obtained from questionnaires completed by the 69 subjects in our study group. CYP2A6

*1A,*4A and CHRNA3 polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme analysis.

Results: Nine percent of the patients were current smokers, 30% were former smokers and 61% non-smokers. Among smokers and former smokers 63% were homozygotes for CYP2A6*1A and 4% were homozygotes for CYP2A6*4A, whereas among non-smokers 66% were homozygotes for CYP2A6*4A (P < 0.0001). There was no significant effect of CYP2A6 or CHRNA3 genotype on UC activity.

Conclusions: We found a very high proportion of poor nicotine metabolizers among non-smoking patients with UC and a very low proportion among current and former smokers, making it difficult to determine the effect of poor metabolizer genotype on disease activity in smokers with UC. However, it may be possible to identify UC patients who are poor metabolizers of nicotine and who may benefit from nicotine or nicotine-like pharmacological treatment.






[1] UC = ulcerative colitis



 
December 2009
A. Blum, R. Shalabi, T. Brofman and I. Shajrawi
August 2009
July 2007
T.Naftali, D.Novick, G.Gabay, M.Rubinstein, and B.Novis

Background: Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are inflammatory bowel diseases with an unknown etiology. Interleukin-18 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is up-regulated in Crohn’s disease. IL-18[1] binding protein neutralizes IL-18. The relationship of IL-18 and IL-18BP[2] and disease activity in these diseases is not fully understood.

Objectives: To investigate the correlation of IL-18 and IL-18BP with disease activity and other disease parameters in inflammatory bowel disease.

Methods: IL-18 and IL-18BP isoform α were measured in 129 patients and 10 healthy individuals. Patients' mean age was 40.5 (range 15–70 years) and 43 were women; 58 Crohn's and 28 colitis patients were in remission and 52 and 14, respectively, were in exacerbation. Twenty-three (19 and 4 respectively) were studied in both remission and exacerbation.

Results: The mean level of free IL-18 was significantly different between healthy individuals and Crohn's patients, and between Crohn's patients during exacerbation and remission (167 ± 32 vs. 471 ± 88 and 325 ± 24 pg/ml, respectively, P < 0.05). Mean level of IL-18BP was significantly different between healthy individuals and Crohn patients, and between Crohn patients during exacerbation and remission (2.1 ± 1.1, 7.5 ± 4 and 5.23 ± 2.8 ng/ml, respectively, P < 0.01). In the colitis patients, mean free IL-18 level and IL-18BP were significantly different between healthy individuals and patients, but not between disease remission and exacerbation (167 ± 32, 492 ± 247 and 451± 69 pg/ml for IL-18, and 2.1 ± 1.1, 7.69 ± 4 and 6.8 ± 7 ng/ml for IL-18BP, respectively, P = 0.05).

Conclusions: IL-18 and IL-18BP levels are higher in patients with inflammatory bowel disease compared to healthy individuals. In Crohn's disease, but not in ulcerative colitis, IL-18 (but not free IL-18) and IL-18BP levels are significantly higher during exacerbation compared to remission. This observation highlights the importance of IL-18 in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases, especially in Crohn's disease.






[1] IL = interleukin



[2] IL-18BP = IL-18 binding protein


January 2005
M.M. Krausz and S.D. Duck

Background: Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis has become the surgical procedure of choice for patients with ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis.

Objectives: To evaluate the long-term functional outcome of patients who underwent this surgical procedure.

Methods: We performed this observational study in 174 consecutive patients: 146 with UC[1] and 28 with FAP[2]. The patients, 91 males and 83 females with a mean age of 34.1 ± 10.6 years (range 6–67 years), underwent the procedure between January 1984 and January 2004 (mean follow-up 64.8 months, range 1–240 months). The indications for surgery were intractable disease in 124 patients (71%), dysplasia in 36 (21%), severe bleeding in 8 (5%), and perforation in 6 (3%).

Results: A protective ileostomy was performed in 140 patients (96%) with UC and 12 (43%) with FAP. An urgent three-stage procedure was necessary in 14 patients (8.4%). A mucosal proctectomy was performed in 94 (54%), and a double stapling technique in 80 (46%). Mean length of hospital stay was 9.4 ± 6.6 days (range 5–34 days, median 8). Complications included pelvic sepsis in 7 patients (4.2%), anastomotic leakage in 8 (4.8%), bowel obstruction in 22 (13.2%), incisional hernia in 12 (7.2%), anastomotic stenosis that usually responded to manual dilatation in 46 (27.6%), pouchitis in 106 (61%), recto-vaginal fistula in 3 (1.8%), retrograde ejaculation in 3 (1.8%), and impotence in 2 (1.2%). There was no mortality in this group of patients. The median number of bowel movements per 24 hours was six in UC patients and five in FAP patients, with at least one bowel movement during the night. Complete daytime and night-time continence was documented in 124 patients (71%). Overall satisfaction was 95%.

Conclusions: Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis confers a long-term good quality of life to both UC and FAP patients, and the majority of patients are fully continent with five to six bowel movements per day. 






[1] UC = ulcerative colitis

[2] FAP = familial adenomatous polyposis


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