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עמוד בית
Sun, 23.06.24

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December 2023
Ron Ben Elyahu MD, Basel Khateeb MD, Eyal Yaacobi MD, Ezequiel Palmanovich MD, Omer Marom MD, David Segal MD, Michael Markushevich MD, Nissim Ohana MD, Yaron S. Brin MD

Background: Hip fractures are a public health problem that disproportionately affects the elderly. Displaced femoral neck fractures were treated historically with hemiarthroplasty, but the use of total hip arthroplasty (THA) is increasing showing superior long-term results.

Objectives: To assess whether THA has superior short-term results compared to bipolar hemiarthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures.

Methods: Two groups of active older patients underwent either cementless bipolar hemiarthroplasty or THA for displaced femoral neck fracture. All patients were operated on using the direct lateral approach to the hip joint. Patients were assessed using the Harris Hip Score at hospital discharge and at 6 weeks follow-up.

Results: We included 40 patients ages 65–85 years; 18 underwent bipolar hemiarthroplasty and 22 THA. The number of women in each group was similar, as was mean age: 73.1 ± 4.2 years in the hemiarthroplasty group and 71.0 ± 3.7 in THA. Harris Hip Score on hospital discharge was similar in both groups. Walking ability at discharge was better in the THA cohort and they were discharged sooner: 5.2 ± 1.3 vs. 6.4 ± 1.7 days following hemiarthroplasty (P = 0.021). At 6 weeks follow-up, the mean Harris Hip Score was higher in the THA group (78.6 ± 11 vs. 61.5 ± 17 for hemiarthroplasty, P < 0.001). Patients in the THA group walked longer distances, needed less support while walking, and reported less pain.

Conclusions: Better short-term results at hospital discharge and at 6 weeks follow-up after THA contributed to earlier patient independence and shorter hospital stays.

September 2013
A. Kadar MD, R. Ankory, H. Sherman, I. Eshed, N. Shasha, A. Gold, M. Aharon and M. Salai

Background: The articular surface replacement (ASR) total hip arthroplasty (THA) was recently recalled from the market due to high failure rates. This modality was used frequently by surgeons at our medical center.

Objectives: To assess the clinical and radiographic outcomes in patients following the surgery and determine the revision rate in our cohort.

Methods: Between 2007 and 2010 139 hips were operated on and evaluated in our clinic. All patients underwent a clinical interview, function and pain evaluation, as well as physical examination and radiographic evaluation. When necessary, patients were sent for further tests, such as measuring cobalt-chromium levels and magnetic resonance hip imaging. Results: With an average follow-up of 42 months the revision rate was 2% (3/139). Patients reported alleviation of pain (from 8.8 to 1.7 on the Visual Analog Scale, P < 0.001), good functional outcomes on the Harris Hip Score, and improved quality of life. Overall satisfaction was 7.86 on the reversed VAS[1]. For patients who required further tests, clinical and radiographic outcomes were significantly poorer than for the rest of the cohort. Average blood ion levels were high above the normal (cobalt 31.39 ppb, chromium 13.32 ppb), and the rate of inflammatory collection compatible with pseudotumors on MRI was 57%.

Discussion: While our study favors the use of the ASR implant both clinically and radiographically, some patients with abnormal ion levels and inflammatory collections on MRI might require revision in the future. 





[1] VAS = Visual Analogue Scale



 
October 2003
I. Dudkiewicz, M. Salai, A. Israeli, Y. Amit and A. Chechick

Background: Previously reported results of total hip arthroplasty in patients younger than 30 years of age indicate a high complication rate and questionable durability.

Objectives: To estimate the results of THA[1] in extremely young patients.

Methods: We report the results of 69 THA procedures in 56 patients who were under the age of 30 at the time of surgery (mean age 23.23 ± 4.31 years) and were followed-up postoperatively for 2–23 years (mean 7.4 ± 3.79 years).

Results: Loosening of the cup (11/69) and early traumatic dislocation (5/69) accounted for the majority of complications.

Conclusion: The final average Harris hip scores of 90.59 ± 9.36 in these patients indicated that THA is a successful and durable treatment modality for young patients with disabling diseases affecting the hip joint. However, due to the likelihood of complications it should be used with caution in this patient group. Efforts should be made to diminish the complication rate.






[1] THA = total hip arthroplasty


December 1999
Ehud Lebel, MD, Menachem Itzchaki, MD, Deborah Elstein, PhD, Irit Hadas-Halpern, MD, Ayala Abrahamov, MD, and Ari Zimran MD.
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