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עמוד בית
Tue, 28.05.24

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June 2020
Lior Leibou MD, Tomer Perlok MD, Rivi Haiat Factor MD, Eyal Leibovitz MD, Jacob Frand MD, Stav Leibou, Dror Sadan MD and Mordechai Shimonov MD

Background: The effect of weight reduction following bariatric surgery is already well known.

Objectives: To investigate the effects of abdominoplasty on metabolic markers indicative of weight loss.

Methods: The authors prospectively enrolled consecutive obese patients after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. They were candidates for post-bariatric surgery abdominoplasty. The authors measured metabolic markers one day prior to surgery, 24 hours after, and 3 months following surgery. They recorded medical and demographic parameters.

Results: Sixteen patients were recruited for participation in the study. Mean age was 47 years and 88% of the patients were female. Bariatric surgery achieved a mean decline in body mass index of 13.8 kg/m2. All patients underwent abdominoplasty. Leptin and insulin levels were slightly increased at 3 months postoperative. No significant changes were observed in glucose, hemoglobin, or triglycerides throughout the study.

Conclusions: In a cohort of obese patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy followed by abdominoplasty, no significant changes were noted in a patient’s metabolic profiles. The results suggest that abdominoplasty has no effect on the metabolic markers tested in contrast to other reports; however, the cosmetic, behavioral, and psychological advantages of abdominoplasty are well established.

December 2010
S. Lurie, H. Asaala, O. Schwartz Harari, A. Golan and O. Sadan

Background: Although the presence of bacteria in the cervix is not a sign of disease, the majority of pathogens involved in pelvic inflammatory disease originate from this "normal" flora.

Objectives: To assess the distribution of cervical non-gonococcal and non-chlamydial bacteria in hospitalized women with PID[1] and the bacteria's antibiotic sensitivity.

Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the cultures obtained from the uterine cervix over a 1 year period (2008) at Wolfson Medical Center, Holon. The distribution of cervical non-gonococcal and non-chlamydial bacteria in women with PID and the bacteria's antibiotic sensitivity was compared to that in our previous 1 year study that was performed at Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot (1988–89). 

Results: In 2008, a total of 412 cultures were obtained of which 126 (30.5%) were sterile. The prevalence of negative cultures was similar in 2008 and in 1988, namely, 30.5% and 33.7%, respectively (P = 0.23). PID was finally diagnosed in 116 patients with positive cultures. The most prevalent bacteria in the 2008 study were Enterococcus species and Escherichia coli – 24.0 % and 26.4% respectively compared to 18.0% and 38.1% in the 1988 study, with the decrease in E. coli isolates being significant (P = 0.0003). In 2008 the antimicrobial sensitivity for various antibiotics ranged from 44.3% to 100.0% (median 90.2%) while in 1988 it ranged from 2.9% to 80.1% (median 51.9%).

Conclusions: The cervical bacterial flora in hospitalized women with PID did not vary significantly between 1988 and 2008. However, antimicrobial sensitivity of the isolated bacteria increased dramatically, probably due to a decrease in resistance to antibiotics.






[1] PID = pelvic inflammatory disease


April 2009
O. Sadan, N. Shemesh, Y. Cohen, E. Melamed and D. Offen

Background: Stem cell-based therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. In our laboratory, a novel protocol has been developed to induce bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neurotrophic factor-secreting cells. These cells produce and secrete factors such as BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and GDNF (glial-derived neurotrophic factor).

Objectives: To evaluate the migratory capacity and efficacy of NTF-SC[1] in animal models of Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease.

Methods: MSCs[2] underwent two-phase medium-based induction. An efficacy study was conducted on the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesion, a rat model for Parkinson's disease. Cells were transplanted on the day of 6-OHDA[3] administration, and amphetamine-induced rotations were measured as a primary behavioral index. In a second experiment, migratory behavior was examined by transplanting cells a distance from a quinolinic acid-induced striatal lesion, a rat model for Huntington's disease. Migration, in vivo, was monitored using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging scans followed by histology.

Results: NTF-SCs attenuated amphetamine-induced rotations by 45%. HPLC analysis demonstrated a marked decrease in dopamine depletion, post-cellular treatment. Moreover, histological assessments revealed that the engrafted cells migrated and acted to regenerate the damaged striatal dopaminergic nerve terminal network. In a preliminary work on an animal model for Huntington's disease, we demonstrated by high resolution MR images and correlating histology that induced cells migrated along the internal capsule towards the QA[4]-induced lesion.

Conclusions: The induced MSCs are a potential therapy for neurodegenerative diseases, due both to their NTF secretion and their ability to migrate towards the diseased tissue.






[1] NTF-SC = neurotrophic factor-secreting cells



[2] MSCs = mesenchymal stem cells



[3] 6-OHDA = 6-hydroxydopamine



[4] QA = quinolinic acid



 
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