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עמוד בית
Wed, 19.06.24

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July 2022
Gal Peleg MD, Ilaria Sterbizzi M. Psych PhD, Roni Peleg MD, and Yulia Treister-Goltzman MD MPH

Background: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe psychiatric disease that is refractory to treatment. To date, there is no effective pharmacological therapy and existing psychotherapy treatment is only partially effective. In neuropsychological terms, AN is characterized by cognitive inflexibility and an overly detailed processing style. Creating artwork and drawing requires integrative thinking that encompasses the big picture.

Objectives: To describe preliminary observations of drawing treatment modality based on precise scientific drawing.

Methods: The artwork method is based on the classic work by squares and on additional techniques from scientific drawing. The method was developed and implemented in a sheltered home for patients with eating disorders in Parma, Italy. Five patients, four women and one man, agreed to participate in a 10-session workshop as a part of multidisciplinary intervention. The ages of participants were 17–28 years and all had presented with AN for several years.

Results: Using the method of copying drawings on squares made it possible to identify features that were common to all the patients, such as focusing on the external form of the drawing rather than on the internal details, exerting strong pressure on the pencil without consideration of the need for future corrections, drawing distorted perceptions of curves, and the adding of significant volume.

Conclusions: Precise scientific drawing could be a useful instrument in the understanding and correction of a patient’s distorted world and self-perspective. More evidence could be provided by further studies with a larger sample and a control group.

February 2022
December 2019
Tali Samson MSW PhD, Roni Peleg MD, Aya Biderman MD and Yan Press MD

Background: The use of graphic depictions (pictorials) to represent medical conditions is an accepted method that can complement standard methodology of comprehensive geriatric assessment.

Objectives: To use the clinical pathway method to develop a comprehensive geriatric genogram assessment tool (CGGAT), which could supplement the written summary letter and recommendations.

Methods: We used the critical paths method to develop a tool to facilitate implementation of the comprehensive geriatric assessment recommendations. A multidisciplinary group of clinicians used the critical pathways method to develop a CGGAT.

Results: We used the CGGAT to depict the physical and functional status of patients and to complement the textual historical information, family dynamics, and current patient issues. CGGAT is a simple instrument that provides a visual structure and it can facilitate the sharing of information among team members, encourage interdisciplinary dialogue, enhance understanding and adherence on the part of patients and professionals, and reduce the burden on the clinicians who conduct the initial comprehensive geriatric assessment.

Conclusions: We showed the benefits and obstacles related to the adaptation of this new tool and provide recommendations for further development. 

August 2019
Yulia Treister-Goltzman MD and Roni Peleg MD

The Bedouins living in southern Israel are a Muslim-Arab population that is transitioning from a nomadic lifestyle to life in permanent settlements. The population has unique characteristics that could affect hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurements. The objective of this study was to describe the socio-demographic and unique morbidity characteristics of this community and their effect on HbA1c measurements. Consanguinity, especially among cousins in the Bedouin population, results in a high prevalence of autosomal recessive genetic diseases such as thalassemia (underestimate of HbA1c), hemoglobinopathies (underestimate and overestimate), Gilbert’s disease, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, an X-linked disorder, which can cause hyperbilirubinemia with an overestimate of HbA1c. Furthermore, nutritional deficiencies, autosomal recessive diseases, high birth rates, parasitic infections, and poverty can all cause high rates of anemia (iron and vitamin B12 deficiencies) that can raise HbA1c levels. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia is found among Bedouin tribes in the Negev region and can lead to an underestimation of HbA1c levels. Pregnancy can also affect HbA1c levels. Medical teams working in the Bedouin community and in other Muslim populations with similar morbidity characteristics throughout the world should identify patients with medical conditions that can affect HbA1c measurements and be aware of possible measurement alternatives such as fructosamine and glycated albumin.

December 2016
Roni Peleg MD and Yulia Treister-Goltzman MD
May 2016
Yulia Treister-Goltzman MD and Roni Peleg MD

There has been a dramatic increase in the number of female physicians in all fields and specializations of medicine, but this increase has not resulted in a redistribution of domestic tasks and responsibilities. Reviewing the literature of the last two decades (April 1994 to April 2014) on how female physicians cope with the challenge of balancing their family and professional lives for the duration of their professional careers revealed that they suffer from the work-family conflict more than other professionals and that it has a more negative effect on women than on men. Women physicians consider work-family balance significantly when making career choices. These considerations affect their career success, their productivity as faculty members, their marital life, and parenthood. Having a supportive spouse at home and a facilitating mentor at work are important for a positive work-family balance among female physicians. Special career-supporting measures, such as flexible work schedules and expanded support for childcare over the course of work and when taking part in academic activities, are critical for female physicians.

January 2016
Yan Press MD and Roni Peleg MD
November 2015
Roni Peleg MD and Yulia Treister-Goltzman MD
September 2015
Uri Yoel MD, Jacob Gopas PhD, Janet Ozer PhD, Roni Peleg MD and Pesach Shvartzman MD

Background: In recent years several reports have been published describing dogs’ ability to detect, by scent, patients with cancer. This ability is based on the sniffing of volatile organic elements that are secreted by malignant cells, react to them. 

Objectives: To evaluate the ability of trained dogs to detect (i) breast cancer cell cultures (MCF7) compared to the control pseudo-normal keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT), and then (ii) melanoma (BG) and (iii) type 2 epithelial lung carcinoma (A549) malignant cell cultures to which they were not previously exposed in the course of their training.

Methods: Cell cultures were prepared in a standard manner. Two Belgian Shepherd dogs were trained and then tested in a single-blind test (for dogs and trainers) on their ability to detect the "target specimen," a MCF7 breast cancer cell culture. Following this, the ability of the dogs to detect cancer cell cultures that they were not previously exposed to (i.e., A549, BG) was tested. In each test round, four specimens placed in identical blocks were arranged in a line with one meter between them: one target specimen (MCF7, A549, BG), two control specimens (HaCaT), and a sample containing cell culture medium only.

Results: The two dogs picked out all the target specimens of MCF7 breast cancer cell cultures that they were trained to detect (10/10) as well as all the target specimens that they were not previously exposed to [A549 (5/5) and BG (5/5)], but did not pick out the control specimens or the cell culture medium. Thus, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for both dogs were 100%.

Conclusions: The results of this study support the assumption that cancer cells have a unique odor pattern, and that this odor pattern is common to different types of cancer.

 

February 2014
Arnon D. Cohen MD MPH PhD, Israel D. Andrews MD, Evgeny Medvedovsky MD, Roni Peleg MD, and Daniel A.Vardy MD MSc
Background: Localized itch of non-pruritoceptive origin is often neuropathic and may be referred to as neuropathic itch syndrome.

Objectives: To describe the results of nerve conduction studies in patients with anogenital pruritus, brachioradial pruritus and scalp dysesthesia, and compare these sites to typical sites of lichen simplex chronicus (LSC).

Methods: The study summarizes previously published data combined with unpublished data of patients with scalp dysesthesia. Nerve conduction studies included measurements of distal sensory and motor latency, conduction velocity and F-responses.

Results: A neuropathy was demonstrated in 29 of 36 patients with anogenital pruritus (80.5%), 8/14 with brachioradial pruritus (57.1%) and 4/9 with scalp dysesthesia (44.4%). The typical sites overlapped with some but not all LSC sites.

Conclusions: A considerable proportion of patients with brachioradial pruritus, anogenital pruritus and scalp dysesthesia have abnormal nerve conduction findings, suggesting a neuropathic origin. The skin sites overlap with some common LSC sites, suggesting that in some cases of LSC a local neuropathy could be a possible cause.

November 2011
G. Vashitz, J. Meyer, Y. Parmet, Y. Henkin, R. Peleg, N. Liebermann and H. Gilutz

Background: There is a wide treatment gap between evidence-based guidelines and their implementation in primary care.

Objective: To evaluate the extent to which physicians "literally" follow guidelines for secondary prevention of dyslipidemia and the extent to which they practice "substitute" therapeutic measures.

Methods: We performed a post hoc analysis of data collected in a prospective cluster randomized trial. The participants were 130 primary care physicians treating 7745 patients requiring secondary prevention of dyslipidemia. The outcome measure was physician "literal" adherence or "substitute" adherence. We used logistic regressions to evaluate the effect of various clinical situations on “literal” and “substitute” adherence.

Results: "Literal" adherence was modest for ordering a lipoprotein profile (35.1%) and for pharmacotherapy initiations (26.0%), but rather poor for drug up-titrations (16.1%) and for referrals for specialist consultation (3.8%). In contrast, many physicians opted for "substitute" adherence for up-titrations (75.9%) and referrals for consultation (78.7%). Physicians tended to follow the guidelines “literally” in simple clinical situations (such as the need for lipid screening) but to use "substitute" measures in more complex cases (when dose up-titration or metabolic consultation was required). Most substitute actions were less intense than the actions recommended by the guidelines.

Conclusions: Physicians often do not blindly follow guidelines, but rather evaluate their adequacy for a particular patient and adjust the treatment according to their assessment. We suggest that clinical management be evaluated in a broader sense than strict guideline adherence, which may underestimate physicians' efforts.
 

D. Rosengarten, M.R. Kramer, G. Amir, L. Fuks and N. Berkman

Pulmonary epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (PEH), previously known as "intravascular bronchoalveolar tumor," is a rare vascular malignancy with an unpredictable prognosis. Treatment can vary from observation in asymptomatic patients to surgery in patients with resectable disease or chemotherapy in patients with disseminated disease. This report describes the clinical, radiological and pathological features of three cases of PEH and a review of the current literature.
 

January 2009
H. Gilutz, L. Novack, P. Shvartzman, J. Zelingher, D.Y. Bonneh, Y. Henkin, M. Maislos, R. Peleg, Z. Liss, G. Rabinowitz, D. Vardy, D. Zahger, R. Ilia, N. Leibermann and A. Porath

Background: Dyslipidemia remains underdiagnosed and undertreated in patients with coronary artery disease. The Computer-based Clinical Decision Support System provides an opportunity to close these gaps.

Objectives: To study the impact of computerized intervention on secondary prevention of CAD[1].

Methods: The CDSS[2] was programmed to automatically detect patients with CAD and to evaluate the availability of an updated lipoprotein profile and treatment with lipid-lowering drugs. The program produced automatic computer-generated monitoring and treatment recommendations. Adjusted primary clinics were randomly assigned to intervention (n=56) or standard care arms (n=56). Reminders were mailed to the primary medical teams in the intervention arm every 4 months updating them with current lipid levels and recommendations for further treatment. Compliance and lipid levels were monitored. The study group comprised all patients with CAD who were alive at least 3 months after hospitalization.

Results: Follow-up was available for 7448 patients with CAD (median 19.8 months, range 6–36 months). Overall, 51.7% of patients were adequately screened, and 55.7% of patients were compliant with treatment recommended to lower lipid level. A significant decrease in low density lipoprotein levels was observed in both arms, but was more pronounced in the intervention arm: 121.9 ± 34.2 vs. 124.3 ± 34.6 mg/dl (P < 0.02). A significantly lower rate of cardiac rehospitalizations was documented in patients who were adequately treated with lipid-lowering drugs, 37% vs. 40.9% (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: This initial assessment of our data represent a real-world snapshot where physicians and CAD patients often do not adhere to clinical guidelines, presenting a major obstacle to implementing effective secondary prevention. Our automatic computerized reminders system substantially facilitates adherence to guidelines and supports wide-range implementation.






[1] CAD = coronary artery disease



[2] CDSS = clinical decision support system


October 2008
A. Neville, R. Peleg, Y. Singer, M. Sherf and P. Shvartzman

Background: The prevalence of chronic pain in the general population ranges from 10% to over 40%, depending on the definition and the population studied. No large study has been conducted in Israel.

Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of patients with chronic pain, and characterize them in a large community random sample.

Methods: We conducted a survey of Clalit Health Services members, interviewing them by phone. A random sample of 4063 Clalit members, 25 years or older and Hebrew speakers, were screened for chronic pain, defined as: any pain or discomfort that in the last 6 months has persisted continuously or intermittently for more than 3 months.

Results: Eight percent (n=325) refused to participate. Of the 3738 included in the study, 1722 (46%) reported chronic pain in at least one site. Most of the patients were over 50 years old (62%) (mean age 56 ± 16, range 27–97 years). Women suffered significantly more than men, as did those who were older, less educated and born in Israel and Eastern Europe. Prevalent painful sites were the back (32%), limbs (17%) and head (13%). More than a third reported severe pain and impaired life activities. Only 4.8% of the patients suffering from chronic pain were referred to pain specialists and 11% used complementary medicine. A logistic regression model showed that women and patients with lower education level were the only significant variables predicting higher life impact index and higher pain severity.

Conclusions: We found a high prevalence of chronic pain in the study population. Chronic pain causes severe disturbance to quality of life. A low rate of referral to pain specialists and complementary medicine was observed.

March 2008
Z. Shani-Gershoni, T. Freud, Y. Press and R. Peleg

Background: Acupuncture and public interest in this modality have increased over recent years in Israel and throughout the western world.

Objectives: To compare the knowledge and attitudes of physicians to medical students with regard to acupuncture.

Methods: An anonymous questionnaire was completed by internists and medical students at the Soroka Medical Center.

Results: There were 122 respondents in all, 57 of them women (46.7%). The study sample included 40 physicians (33%), 39 fifth year medical students (32%) and 43 second year medical students (35%). The majority of participants (93.4%) had never received training in acupuncture and 84.4% had never undergone acupuncture therapy themselves. In these variables there were no significant differences between the physicians and the students. The participants’ level of knowledge of acupuncture was very low, with 40% unable to answer even one question (of eight) correctly. Despite the poor level of knowledge and the lack of personal exposure to acupuncture, 90 participants (74%) believed that acupuncture has more than a placebo effect, and 57 (42%) believed it was important to include acupuncture in medical education. There were no statistically significant differences in the attitudes of physicians and medical students to acupuncture.

Conclusions: The level of knowledge and exposure of physicians and medical students to acupuncture is low. However, both groups have relatively positive attitudes to this modality as an acceptable treatment for health problems and were open to its inclusion in the medical school curriculum.

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