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עמוד בית
Mon, 26.02.24

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September 2016
Carolina Aulestia MD, Alberto De Zubiría MD, Carlos Granados MD, Johanna Suárez MD and Ricard Cervera MD

Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with multiorgan involvement and wide variability in presentation and course. Although it can appear at any age, women of childbearing age are primarily affected. This has led to the proposal of a hormonal role in the development of SLE. Among the main hormones shown to have immunomodulatory effects are estradiol, progesterone and prolactin.

Objectives: To report the levels of estradiol and prolactin in SLE patients and establish the relationship between these levels and disease activity, and to determine whether the phases of the menstrual cycle influence the activity of SLE and its relationship to hormone levels.

Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we examined 60 women with SLE. We measured disease activity using SLEDAI and BILAG. We obtained peripheral blood samples to determine the levels of estradiol, progesterone, and prolactin. 

Results: Patients’ age ranged between 16 and 65 years and the mean disease duration was 5.5 years (0–20). SLE was active (SLEDAI > 6) in 13 patients and inactive in 47. Thirty patients were in a pre-ovulatory menstrual cycle phase, 13 in a post-ovulatory cycle, and 17 were menopausal. We found a significant association between C4 levels and disease activity (P = 0.01) and between estradiol levels and disease activity in the kidney (P = 0.04). We did not find hyperprolactinemia in any patient. 

Conclusions: In this population, we found an association between estradiol levels and organ-specific activity in the kidney. One may speculate as to whether our population might benefit from the implementation of anti-estrogen therapy for control of disease activity, particularly in the kidney.

 

November 2014
Ricardo Silvariño MD MSc, Oscar Noboa MD and Ricard Cervera MD PhD FRCP
Basement membranes form an anatomic barrier that contains connective tissue. They are composed of type IV collagen, laminin and proteoglycans. Anti-basement membrane antibodies bind to the non-collagen site of the α3 chain of type IV collagen. A group of renal diseases, pulmonary diseases and perhaps others affecting different organs have long been associated with the presence of antibodies directed against glomerular basement membrane (GBM), alveolar basement membrane and tubular basement membrane. Goodpasture disease has a frequency of 0.5 to 1 case by million/year, and is responsible for up to 20% of crescentic glomerulonephritis in renal biopsy. It has been associated with genetic and immune abnormalities and there are usually environmental triggers preceding clinical onset. Renal disease can occur isolated or in association with pulmonary hemorrhage. In general, renal disease has a rapid progression that determines severe compromise, with rare spontaneous resolution. The diagnosis of Goodpasture disease requires the presence of the anti-GBM antibody, either in circulation or in renal tissue. The prognosis of non-treated patients is poor. The standard of care is plasma exchange combined with prednisone and cyclophosphamide. Anti-GBM antibody levels must be monitored frequently until their disappearance, and then every 6 months to confirm sustained remission in the absence of clinical signs of recurrence. Prognosis of the disease is strongly associated with its initial presentation. Survival rates are related to the degree of renal compromise at onset of the disease. Recurrence of the disease post-transplantation is low.
September 2014
Ignasi Rodríguez-Pintó MD, Alessandra. Soriano MD, Gerard Espinosa MD PhD, Yehuda Shoenfeld MD FRCP and Ricard Cervera MD PhD FRCP
May 2012
A. Zamora-Ustaran, R.O. Escarcega-Alarcón, M. Garcia-Carrasco, E. Faugier, S. Mendieta-Zeron, C. Mendoza-Pinto, Á. Montiel-Jarquin, M. Muñoz-Guarneros, A. Lopez-Colombo and R. Cervera

Background: Data on pediatric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are very sparse.

Objectives: To describe the main clinical characteristics, laboratory data and complications of pediatric APS patients, and to analyze the differences between primary APS and APS associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed clinical and laboratory data of 32 children at “Federico Gomez,” the children’s hospital of México. Nineteen patients had SLE, 12 (37.5%) had primary APS and 1 (3%) had immune thrombocytopenic purpura. We collected information on sociodemographic variables, vaccinations, age at onset, and family history of rheumatic disease, hematological disorders, skin disorders and non-thrombotic neurological disorders. Immunological features included immunoglobulin (Ig) G and M aCl antibodies, IgG and IgM b2 glycoprotein I, lupus anticoagulant, anti-dsDNA and antinuclear antibodies.

Results: The patients included 24 females and 8 males. The most common thrombotic events were small vessel thrombosis (44%), venous thrombosis (28%) mainly deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in lower extremities, and arterial thrombosis (25%). The most common clinical non-thrombotic manifestations were hematological (53%) and neurological disorders (22%). There were no significant differences between groups with regard to the site of thrombosis, non-thrombotic clinical manifestations or laboratory features.

Conclusions: There were some important differences between the clinical manifestations of APS in children compared with adults, but we found no significant differences between patients with primary and APS associated with SLE. Larger studies in Latin American APS children are necessary to determine whether there are differences between ethnic groups.

 


June 2011
M. Garcia-Carrasco, C. Mendoza-Pinto, C. Riebeling, M. Sandoval-Cruz, A. Nava, I. Etchegaray-Morales, M. Jimenez-Hernandez, A. Montiel-Jarquin, A. Lopez-Colombo and R. Cervera

 Background: The prevalence of vertebral fractures in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) ranges between 20% and 21.4%, and patients with these fractures have impaired walking and activities of daily living. Moreover, clinical and radiological vertebral fractures have been associated with increased mortality.
 Objectives: To compare the quality of life of patients with SLE[1] with and without vertebral fractures.

Methods: The study group comprised 140 women with SLE undergoing screening for vertebral fractures using a standardized method. SLE disease activity and organ damage were measured by the Mexican Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (MEX-SLEDAI) and Systemic International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology damage index (SLICC), respectively. The QUALEFFO and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale were used to measure health-related quality of life and depression, respectively.

Results: The median age of the 140 patients was 43 years (range 18–76); disease duration was 72 months (range 6–432); 49.7% were menopausal. Thirty-four patients (24.8%) had vertebral fractures (≥ 1), mostly in the thoracic spine. Patients with vertebral fractures had a higher mean age (49.5 ± 13.4 vs. 41 ± 13.2 years, P = 0.001) and disease damage (57.1% vs. 34.4%, P = 0.001). The global QUALEFFO score was not different between the vertebral fractures group and the non-vertebral group. The only significant difference in the QUALEFFO items was in physical function (P = 0.04). A significant correlation was found between the severity of vertebral fractures and the QUALEFFO pain (r = 0.27, P = 0.001) and physical function (r = 0.37, P = 0.02) scores. The number of vertebral fractures correlated only with physical function (r = 0.01).

Conclusions: The HRQOL of women with SLE is low, regardless of whether they have vertebral fractures or not, but patients with vertebral fractures have worse physical function compared to those without. Strategies to improve the HRQOL of patients with SLE with or without vertebral fractures are necessary.






[1] SLE = systemic lupus erythematosus



 
August 2009
M. García-Carrasco, C. Mendoza-Pinto, R.O. Escárcega, M. Jiménez-Hernández, I. Etchegaray Morales, P. Munguía Realpozo, J. Rebollo-Vázquez, E. Soto-Vega, M. Delezé and R. Cervera

In recent years the survival of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus has increased markedly. Consequently, long-term complications, such as osteoporosis, are currently of paramount importance. SLE[1] is known to increase the risk of bone fractures, and numerous studies have found that SLE patients have osteoporosis. Of the various risk factors associated with osteoporosis in SLE, disease duration, the use of corticosteroids and chronic disease-related damage are consistently reported, with differences between studies probably due to the different populations studied. The role of chronic inflammation in osteoporosis is also important. On the other hand, little attention has been paid to osteoporotic fractures, especially of the vertebra, which are associated with reduced quality of life, increased mortality rates and increased risk of new vertebral and non-vertebral fractures in the general population.






[1] SLE = systemic lupus erythematosus



 
August 2007
M. Garcia-Carrasco, R.O. Escarcega, C. Mendoza-Pinto, A. Zamora-Ustaran, I. Etchegaray-Morales, J. Rojas-Rodriguez, L.E. Escobar-Linares and R. Cervera
August 2002
Gerard Espinosa, MD, Ricard Cervera, MD, PhD, Joan-Carles Reverter, MD, PhD, Dolors Tassies, MD, PhD, Josep Font, MD, PhD and Miguel Ingelmo, MD, PhD
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