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עמוד בית
Tue, 16.07.24

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March 2023
Ofira Zloto MD, Irit Barequet MD, Orit Ezra Nimni MD, Yoav Berger MD, Juliana Gildener-Leapman MD, Gal Antman MD, Noa Avni-Zauberman MD

Background: The cornea is one of the most densely innervated in the body. Pterygium surgery includes removal of the pterygium tissue from the cornea and conjunctiva followed by autologous conjunctival grafting.

Objectives: To examine the change in corneal and conjunctival sensation post-pterygium surgery.

Methods: This prospective study included patients with primary pterygium. We collected and analyzed demographic data, visual acuity (VA), refraction, quantified sensation, and corneal tomography. Comparison in sensation in the cornea, conjunctiva, and conjunctival autograft was recorded the day of surgery and at least 6 months postoperatively.

Results: Nine patients participated in the study. Mean follow-up time was 9 months (9 ± 3.3, 6–12.4). No complications were documented during or following surgery and no recurrences were found. Statistically significant increases in corneal sensation in the nasal corneal and in the nasal conjunctival areas were noted by the end of follow-up compared to before surgery (P = 0.05, paired samples t-test). There was a significant correlation between the increase in nasal corneal and conjunctival sensation with improved Schirmer testing outcomes and tear break-up time after surgery (P = 0.05, P = 0.01, Pearson correlation). There was a positive correlation between the changes in nasal corneal sensation after surgery and improved changes in VA (P = 0.02, Pearson correlation).

Conclusions: We found improvement in sensation 9 months after pterygium surgery, which may be due to reinnervation of the cornea and conjunctival autograft from the neighboring non-injured nerve fibers. Larger studies with confocal microscopy should be conducted for further analysis.

April 2008
S. Berestizschevsky, D. Weinberger, I. Avisar and R. Avisar
December 2002
David Varssano MD, Adi Michaeli-Cohen MD and Anat Loewenstein MD

Background: Pterygium is a common disease in Israel. Different surgical techniques are used to manage it with varying degrees of success.

Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a conjunctival autograft after excision of pterygium.

Methods: Excision followed by conjunctival autograft was used to treat 40 eyes of 40 patients with pterygium. The surgical results were evaluated retrospectively. Follow-up continued for a median of 296 days (range 6±1,056); 26 cases were followed for more than 100 days (average 418 days) and comprised the study cohort. All reported procedures were performed consequentially and by one surgeon in the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Israel between 1 June 1997 and 31 March 2000.

Results: There were two recurrences of pterygium (2/26, 7.7%) 2 months postoperatively. There were no major complications. Super-ficial corneal vessels (without concurrent fibrosis) appeared in 10 of 17 cases sutured with nylon, but none occurred in any of the seven grafts sutured with vicryl (P = 0.068). The average LogMAR-corrected visual acuity of the study group improved slightly, from 6/16.5 to 6/11 (P = 0.003).

Conclusions: Excision of pterygium with a conjunctival autograft is a safe and effective operation, with no procedure-specific added surgical risks. The relatively long surgical time and microsurgical methods required to perform the procedure properly have hindered its acceptance as the mainstream approach to pterygium management. Long-term follow-up is needed for better discernment of the surgical results in Israel.
 

November 2001
Rahamim Avisar, MD, Aharon Arnon, MD, Erez Avisar, BSc and Dov Weinberger, MD

Background: The time to recurrence after surgical removal of primary pterygium (pterygium) and the association between the rate of recurrence and the postoperative interval remain unclear.

Objective: To determine the amount of follow-up time needed to identify recurrence in patients after surgical removal of pterygium.

Methods: We rviewed the files of 143 patients (143 eyes) with recurrent pterygium to determine the interval from surgery to recurrence.

Results: Almost all (91.6%) of the recurrences appeared by 360 days after surgery.

Conclusions: One year is the optimal follow-up time to identify recurrence of pterygium.

January 2000
Rahamim Avisar MD, Nissim Loya MD, Yuval Yassur MD and Dov Weinberger MD

Background: Previous work has suggested an association between increasing size of pterygium and increasing degrees of induced corneal astigmatism.

Objectives: To assess the quantitative relation between pterygium size and induced corneal astigmatism using a computerized corneal analysis system (TMS II) and slit-lamp beam evaluation of pterygium size, and to conclude whether corneal astigmatism is an early indication for surgical intervention.

Methods: We evaluated 94 eyes of 94 patients with unilateral primary pterygium of different sizes, using TMS II and slit-lamp beam measurements of the size of the pterygium (in millimeters) from the limbus to assess parameters of pterygium size with induced corneal astigmatism. Best corrected visual Snellen acuity was performed.

Results: Primary pterygium induced with-the-rule astigmatism. Pterygium extending 16% of the corneal radius or 1.1 mm or less from the limbus produced increasing degrees of induced astigmatism of more than 1.0 diopter. Significant astigmatism was found in 16.16% of 24 eyes with pterygium of 0.2 up to 1.0 mm in size, in 45.45% of 22 eyes with pterygium of 1.1 up to 3.0 mm in size (P≤0.0004), and in 100% of 3 eyes with pterygium of 5.1 up to 6.7 mm in size (P=0.0005). We found that visual acuity was decreased when topographic astigmatism was increased.

Conclusions: When primary pterygium reaches more than 1.0 mm in size from the limbus it induces with-the-rule significant astigmatism (≥1.0 diopter). This significant astigmatism tends to increase with the increasing size of the lesion. Topographic astigmatism tends to be improved by successful removal of the pterygium. These findings suggest that early surgical intervention in the pterygium may be indicated when the lesion is more than 1.0 mm in size from the limbus.

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