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עמוד בית
Fri, 24.05.24

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August 2023
Netta Shoenfeld BA, Nancy Agmon-Levin MD, David R. Serfaty MD, Revital Mann MD, Bat-Sheva Porat Katz MD, Rael D. Strous MD MHA

Background: While several studies have noted smell impairment in schizophrenia, it is unclear whether this impairment extends to acute psychosis and whether it is associated with more severe illness as expressed in extended hospitalization.

Objectives: To evaluate the olfactory function of patients in an acute psychotic state and correlate it with clinical symptomatology and length of hospitalization.

Methods: Olfactory function was assessed in 20 patients with schizophrenia in their first week of hospital admission for acute psychosis compared with matched controls. Olfaction was evaluated via three stages: threshold, discrimination, and identification of different odors utilizing the Sniffin' Sticks test battery.

Results: Schizophrenia patients scored significantly lower on total smell score, discrimination, and identification abilities. A significant association was observed between hospitalization duration and total smell score and smell discrimination. No significant associations between smell and clinical symptomatology were observed.

Conclusions: Study observations confirm impaired sense of smell in schizophrenia patients and suggest that smell impairment may be a potential marker of more serious illness as expressed in longer hospital stay.

October 2020
Sol Jaworowski MBBS FRANZCP, Mark Weiser MD, Cornelius Gropp MD, and Moria Malka MD
December 2018
Yuval Raveh MD, Tawfik Khoury MD, Moshe Lachish MD, Rifaat Safadi MD and Yoav Kohn MD
December 2016
Claudia Brogna MD, Raffaele Manna MD PhD, Ilaria Contaldo MD, Domenico M. Romeo MD, Maria Chiara Stefanini MD, Antonio Chiaretti MD, Eugenio Mercuri MD PhD and Paolo Mariotti MD
August 2016
Bernardo Melamud MD, Shikma Keller MD, Mahmud Mahamid MD, Kalman Paz MD and Eran Goldin MD
September 2014
Itai Horowitz MD, Alla Kaplan MD, Suzanna Mostovoy MD, Nurit El-Bar MD, Alex Gizunterman MD and Daniela Amital MD MHA
March 2014
Tal Bergman-Levy, Jeremia Heinik and Yuval Melamed
Testamentary capacity refers to an individual's capability to write his or her own will. Psychiatrists are required occasionally to give expert opinions regarding the testamentary capacity of individuals with a medical history or suspected diagnosis of a mental illness. This may stem from the patient/lawyer/family initiative to explore the current capacity to testate in anticipation of a possible challenge, or may be sought when testamentary capacity of a deceased has been challenged. In this article we examine the medico-legal construct of testamentary capacity of the schizophrenic patient, and discuss the various clinical situations specific to schizophrenic patients, highlighting their impact on the medical opinion regarding testamentary capacity through examining the rulings of the Israeli Supreme Court in a specific case where the testamentary capacity of a mentally ill individual who was challenged postmortem, and provide a workable framework for the physician to evaluate the capacity of a schizophrenia patient to write a will.

January 2003
R.D. Strous, R. Stryjer, M. Zerzion, M. Weiss and F. Bar
September 2001
Rafik Masalha, MD, Bella Chudakov, MD, Mohammed Morad MD, Inna Rudoy, MD, Ilia Volkov, MD and Itzhak Wirguin, MD
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