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עמוד בית
Tue, 16.07.24

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March 2023
Yoav Siegler MD, Chen Ben David MD, Zeev Weiner MD, Ido Solt MD

Late, preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM) presents a major obstetrical challenge balancing between iatrogenic prematurity and risk of prolonged rupture of membranes. In recent years, the pendulum has been shifting toward expectant management until gestation week 37 + 0. We examined the latest guidelines and major trials and summarized optimal management. We addressed the major dilemmas of women with PPROM during gestation weeks 34 + 0 to 36 + 6.

June 2016
Doron Goldberg MD MHA, Avi Tsafrir MD, Naama Srebnik MD, Michael Gal MD PhD, Ehud J. Margalioth MD, Pnina Mor CNM PHD, Rivka Farkash MPH, Arnon Samueloff MD and Talia Eldar-Geva MD PhD

Background: Fertility treatments are responsible for the rise in high order pregnancies in recent decades and their associated complications. Reducing the number of embryos returned to the uterus will reduce the rate of high order pregnancies.     

Objectives: To explore whether obstetric history and parity have a role in the clinician’s decision making regarding the number of embryos transferred to the uterus during in vitro fertilization (IVF).

Methods: In a retrospective study for the period August 2005 to March 2012, data were collected from twin deliveries > 24 weeks, including parity, mode of conception (IVF vs. spontaneous), gestational age at delivery, preeclampsia, birth weight, admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and Apgar scores. 

Results: A total of 1651 twin deliveries > 24 weeks were recorded, of which 959 (58%) were at term (> 37 weeks). The early preterm delivery (PTD) rate (< 32 weeks) was significantly lower with increased parity (12.6%, 8.5%, and 5.6%, in women with 0, 1, and ≥ 2 previous term deliveries, respectively). Risks for PTD (< 37 weeks), preeclampsia and NICU admission were significantly higher in primiparous women compared to those who had one or more previous term deliveries. Primiparity and preeclampsia, but not IVF, were significant risk factors for PTD. 

Conclusions: The risk for PTD in twin pregnancies is significantly lower in women who had a previous term delivery and decreases further after two or more previous term deliveries. This finding should be considered when deciding on the number of embryos to be transferred in IVF.  

 

December 2002
Shlomo Eliyahu MD, Ehud Weiner MD, Zohar Nachum MD and Eliezer Shalev MD.

Background: Prematurity remains the most significant cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Knowing which group of women is at risk for developing preterm labor will define a target population for better prenatal care and prevention modalities.

Objective: To examine whether preterm delivery rates are associated with ethnicity, age, parity, and style of living.

Methods: We conducted a longitudinal case series examining obstetric and demographic data of 17,493 deliveries that occurred between June 1994 and May 1999. All deliveries were performed in the obstetric department of HaEmek Medical Center (Afula, Israel), which serves as a referral center. The main outcome measures were preterm delivery, as related to the women's ethnicity, age parity, and style of living ± namely, town, village, or kibbutz.

Results: The overall preterm delivery rate was 8.5%. The preterm delivery rate in non-Jewish women (10.5%) was higher than in Jewish women (7.1%) (P < 0.00001). The preterm delivery rate in women younger than 20 or older than 40 (12.5%) was much higher than in women between the ages of 21 and 40 (8.0%) (P< 0.00001). Grand-multipara women (>8) had a higher preterm delivery rate (13.8%) than less parous women (8.5%) (P < 0.012). Style of living was also associated with the preterm delivery rate (P< 0.00001): kibbutz 5.5%, Jewish towns 7.8%, non-Jewish towns 8.7%, Jewish villages 6.7%, and non-Jewish villages 11.0%.

Conclusions: Style of living, ethnicity, age and parity are statistically significant risk factors for preterm delivery in our area. These factors provide a more definable target population for better prenatal care.
 

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