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עמוד בית
Sat, 20.04.24

Search results


June 2023
Yotam Bronstein MD, Dana Elhadad MD, Eyas Midlij MD, Moshe Yana MD, Daniel Yakubovich MD, Nechama Sharon MD

Background: Factor VII (FVII) deficiency is characterized by normal activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prolonged prothrombin time (PT) values. It is diagnosed by determining protein level and coagulation activity (FVII:C). FVII:C measurements are expensive and time consuming.

Objectives: To analyze correlations between PT, international normalized ratio (INR), and FVII:C in pediatric patients before otolaryngology surgery and to establish alternative methods for identifying FVII deficiency.

Methods: FVII:C data were collected from 96 patients with normal aPTT and prolonged PT values during preoperative otolaryngology surgery coagulation workup between 2016 and 2020. We compared demographic and clinical parameters using Spearman correlation coefficient and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to determine the accuracy of PT and INR values to predict FVII deficiency.

Results: The median values of PT, INR and FVII:C were 13.5 seconds, 1.14, and 67.5%, respectively. In total, 65 participants (67.7%) displayed normal FVII:C compared to 31 (32.3%) with decreased FVII:C. A statistically significant negative correlation was observed between FVII:C and PT values and between FVII:C and INR. Despite statistically significant ROC of 0.653 for PT (P-value = 0.017, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 0.529–0.776) and 0.669 for INR (P-value = 0.08, 95%CI 0.551–0.788), we were unable to determine an optimal cutoff point to predict FVII:C deficiency with high sensitivity and high specificity.

Conclusions: We could not identify a PT or INR threshold to best predict clinically relevant FVII:C levels. When PT is abnormal, determining FVII:C protein levels is needed for diagnosing FVII deficiency and considering surgical prophylactic treatment.

December 2022
Felix Pavlotsky MD, Arik Alkhazov BMED Sc, Aviv Barzilai MD, Alon Scope MD

Background: The adherence to a narrowband ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) treatment plan is derived, in large part, from the patient’s skin tolerance to the phototherapy dose. At present, the initial and first-month incremental phototherapy doses are determined prior to treatment initiation based on the patient's Fitzpatrick skin phototyping.

Objectives: To identify variables that predict adherence to NB-UVB first-month treatment dosage plan.

Methods: Charts of 1000 consecutive patients receiving NB-UVB at a hospital-based phototherapy unit were retrospectively analyzed. We included patients receiving NB-UVB for atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, vitiligo, and mycosis fungoides. The first-month NB-UVB treatment plan was determined based on the patient's Fitzpatrick phototype. Adherence to treatment was defined as receiving at least 80% of the planned first-month cumulative dose. We compared adherent vs. non-adherent patient groups for age, sex, Fitzpatrick phototype, presence of freckles, nevus count category, and type of dermatological disease.

Results: The study included 817 eligible patients, mean age 40 (2–95) years; 54% men; 32% had Fitzpatrick phototype I-II. Distribution by diagnosis was atopic dermatitis (29%), psoriasis (27%), vitiligo (23%), and mycosis fungoides (21%). Adherence to NB-UVB treatment plan was observed in 71% of patients. Adherence decreased with age, with 7% decrease per year (P = 0.03) and was higher among mycosis fungoides patients (77.3%) compared to all other diagnoses (69.8%; P = 0.02).

Conclusions: Adherence to NB-UVB treatment may be related to age and diagnosis. Fitzpatrick phototype-based first-month treatment plans should be modified accordingly.

October 2022
Sari Tal MD

Background: Hospitalization is an inherently serious event in the oldest-old, as the risk of complications associated with it increases exponentially with age and can lead to death. Despite the size of the problem, few studies have been dedicated to determining mortality predictors among hospitalized older patients, particularly among the oldest-old.

Objectives: To examine in-hospital mortality predictors in the oldest-old adults hospitalized in an acute geriatric ward.

Methods: We retrospectively surveyed electronic hospital health records of 977 elderly patients, aged ³ 90 years, admitted between January 2007 and December 2010 from the emergency department to the acute geriatrics department. We compared the characteristics of the patients who survived to those who died during the hospital stay.

Results: The patients mean age was 93.4 years. In-hospital mortality rate was about 11.6%. Mortality predictors were female sex, on-admission pneumonia, co-morbid congestive heart failure and cerebrovascular accident, high troponin I levels, lower levels of albumin, and higher level of urea (P = 0.032, P < 0.0001, P = 0.0015, P = 0.0049, P = 0.0503, P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively). Consumption of ³ 5 drugs and the number of hospitalizations in the last year were inversely associated with death (P = 0.0145 and P < 0.0001, respectively).

Conclusions: Careful evaluation of mortality predictors might be useful for therapeutic planning and identification of potential inpatients for specific interventions. Awareness of in-hospital mortality predictors might contribute to reducing in-hospital death.

December 2021
Ido Veisman MD, Doron Yablecovitch MD, Uri Kopylov MD, Rami Eliakim MD, Shomron Ben-Horin MD, and Bella Ungar MD

Background: Up to 60% of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients treated with infliximab develop antibodies to infliximab (ATI), which are associated with low drug levels and loss of response (LOR). Hence, mapping out predictors of immunogenicity toward infliximab is essential for tailoring patient-specific therapy. Jewish Sephardi ethnicity, in addition to monotherapy, has been previously identified as a potential risk factor for ATI formation and infliximab failure.

Objectives: To explore the association between Jewish sub-group ethnicity among patients with IBD and the risk of infliximab immunogenicity and therapy failure. To confirm findings of a previous cohort that addressed the same question.

Methods: This retrospective cohort study included all infliximab-treated patients of Jewish ethnicity with regular prospective measurements of infliximab trough levels and ATI. Drug and ATI levels were prospectively measured, clinical data was retrieved from medical charts.

Results: The study comprised 109 Jewish patients (54 Ashkenazi, 55 Sephardi) treated with infliximab. There was no statistically significant difference in proportion of ATI between Sephardi and Ashkenazi patients with IBD (32% Ashkenazi and 33% Sephardi patients developed ATI, odds ratio [OR] 0.944, P = 0.9). Of all variables explored, monotherapy and older age were the only factors associated with ATI formation (OR 0.336, 95% confidence interval 0.145–0.778, P = 0.01, median 34 vs. 28, interquartile range 28–48, 23–35 years, P = 0.02, respectively).

Conclusions: Contrary to previous findings, Sephardi Jewish ethnicity was not identified as a risk factor for ATI formation compared with Ashkenazi Jewish ethnicity. Other risk factors remained unchanged.

December 2018
Yael Shapira-Galitz MD, Galia Karp MD, Oded Cohen MD, Doron Halperin MD MHA, Yonatan Lahav MD and Nimrod Adi MD

Background: Nasal device-related pressure ulcers are scarcely addressed in the literature.

Objective: To assess the prevalence and severity of cutaneous and mucosal nasogastric tube (NGT)-associated pressure ulcers (PU) in critically ill patients and to define predictors for their formation.

Methods: A single center observational study of intensive care unit patients with a NGT for more than 48 hours was conducted. Nasal skin was evaluated for PU. Ulcers were graded according to their depth. Consenting patients underwent a nasoendoscopic examination to evaluate intranasal mucosal injury.

Results: The study comprised 50 patients, 17 of whom underwent nasoendoscopic examination. Mean time of NGT presence in the nose was 11.3 ± 6.17 days. All patients had some degree of extranasal PU, 46% were low grade and 54% were high grade. Predictors for high grade extranasal PU compared to low grade PU were higher peak Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores (11.52 vs. 8.87, P = 0.009), higher peak C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (265.3 mg/L vs. 207.58, P = 0.008), and bacteremia (33.3% vs. 8.7%, P = 0.037). The columella was the anatomical site most commonly involved and the most severely affected. The number of intranasal findings and their severity were significantly higher in the nasal cavity containing the NGT compared to its contralateral counterpart (P = 0.039 for both).

Conclusions: NGTs cause injury to nasal skin and mucosa in critically ill patients. Patients with bacteremia, high CRP, and high SOFA scores are at risk for severe ulcers, warranting special monitoring and preventive measures.

August 2018
Anan Younis MD, Dov Freimark MD, Robert Klempfner MD, Yael Peled MD, Yafim Brodov MD, Ilan Goldenberg MD and Michael Arad MD

Background: Cardiac damage caused by oncological therapy may manifest early or many years after the exposure.

Objectives: To determine the differences between sub-acute and late-onset cardiotoxicity in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) recovery as well as long-term prognosis.

Methods: We studied 91 patients diagnosed with impaired systolic function and previous exposure to oncological therapy. The study population was divided according to sub-acute (from 2 weeks to ≤ 1 year) and late-onset (> 1 year) presentation cardiotoxicity. Recovery of LVEF of at least 50% was defined as the primary end point and total mortality was the secondary end point.

Results: Fifty-three (58%) patients were classified as sub-acute, while 38 (42%) were defined as late-onset cardiotoxicity. Baseline clinical characteristics were similar in the two groups. The mean LVEF at presentation was significantly lower among patients in the late-onset vs. sub-acute group (28% vs. 37%, respectively, P < 0.001). Independent predictors of LVEF recovery were trastuzumab therapy and a higher baseline LVEF. Although long-term mortality rates were similar in the groups with sub-acute and late-onset cardiotoxicity, improvement of LVEF was independently associated with reduced mortality.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that early detection and treatment of oncological cardiotoxicity play an important role in LVEF recovery and long-term prognosis.

May 2017
Sa’ar Minha MD, Tali Taraboulos MD, Gabby Elbaz-Greener MD, Eran Kalmanovich MD, Zvi Vered MD and Alex Blatt MD MSc
June 2015
Yacov Shacham MD, Eran Leshem-Rubinow MD, Arie Steinvil MD, Gad Keren MD, Arie Roth MD and Yaron Arbel MD

Abstract

Background: In the era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), information on the incidence and prognostic significance of high degree atrioventricular block (AVB) in ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients is limited.

Objectives: To assess the incidence, time of onset, predictors and prognostic significance of high degree AVB in a large cohort of consecutive STEMI patients undergoing PPCI.

Methods: We retrospectively studied 1244 consecutive STEMI patients undergoing PPCI. Patient records were reviewed for the presence of high degree AVB, its time of occurrence and relation to in-hospital complications, as well as long-term mortality over a 5 year period.

Results: High degree AVB was present in 33 patients (3.0%), in 25 (76%) of whom the conduction disorder occurred prior to PPCI. Twelve patients (36%) required temporary pacing, all prior to or during coronary intervention, and all AVB resolved spontaneously before hospital discharge. AVB was associated with a significantly higher 30 day (15 % vs. 2.0%, P = 0.001) and long-term mortality rate (30% vs. 6.0%, P < 0.001). Time of AVB had no effect on mortality. In a multivariate regression model, AVB emerged as an independent predictor for long-term mortality (hazard ratio 2.8, 95% confidence interval 1.20–6.44, P = 0.001).

Conclusions: High degree AVB remains a significant prognostic marker in STEMI patients in the PPCI era, albeit transient.

July 2014
Michael Arad MD, Tamar Nussbaum MD, Ido Blechman BA, Micha S. Feinberg MD, Nira Koren-Morag PhD,Yael Peled MD and Dov Freimark MD

Background: Contemporary therapies improve prognosis and may restore left ventricular (LV) size and function.

Objectives: To examine the prevalence, clinical features and therapies associated with reverse remodeling (RR) in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM).

Methods: The study group comprised 188 DCM patients who had undergone two echo examinations at least 6 months apart. RR was defined as increased LV ejection fraction (LVEF) by ≥ 10% concomitant with ≥ 10% decreased LV end-diastolic dimension.

Results: RR occurred in 50 patients (26%) and was associated with significantly reduced end-systolic dimension, left atrial size, grade of mitral regurgitation, and pulmonary artery pressure. NYHA class improved in the RR group. RR was less common in familial DCM and a long-standing disease and was more prevalent in patients with prior exposure to chemotherapy. Recent-onset disease, lower initial LVEF and normal electrocardiogram were identified as independent predictors of RR. Beta-blocker dose was related to improved LVEF but not to RR. Over a mean follow-up of 23 months, 16 patients (12%) from the 'no-RR' group died or underwent heart transplantation compared to none from the RR group (P < 0.01).

Conclusions: Contemporary therapies led to an an improvement in the condition of a considerable number of DCM patients. A period of close observation while optimizing medical therapy should be considered before deciding on invasive procedures. 

March 2011
S. Halachmi, B. Moskovitz, R. Farfara and O. Nativ

Background: One of the major concerns in performing nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the risk of tumor recurrence.

Objectives: To assess the rate, predictors and mechanisms of oncological failure in patients after NSS[1] for renal cancer.

Methods: Between 1993 and 2008 NSS was performed in 229 patients via flank incision. Only patients without metastases at diagnosis and minimal 12 months follow-up were included in the outcome analysis.

Results: During a mean follow-up of 45 ± 34 months (range 6–168 months) tumor recurrence was observed in 13 patients (5.6%). Mean follow-up time for detection of oncological failure was 51 months (range 6–132 months).  All patients with oncological failure were males, with a mean age of 61 years (median 58, range 51–74 years). The average size of the enucleated lesion was 5 cm (range 4–7 cm). Intraoperative frozen sections as well as postoperative final pathological examination of the surgical margins were negative in all recurrent cases. Mechanisms of recurrence were distant metastases (n=4), surgical scar implantation (n=2), perirenal fat recurrence (n=2), local renal recurrence at the surgical site (n=1), and new renal lesions (n=4). Predictors of oncological failure included warm ischemia time (P = 0.058), tumor size (P = 0.001), tumor location (central versus peripheral) (P = 0.015), and multifocality (P = 0.001).

Conclusions: Distant dissemination, seeding during surgery, residual disease and new growth are the mechanisms responsible for cancer relapse. Large central lesions, long warm ischemia time and multifocality were significant predictors of oncological failure.






[1] NSS = nephron-sparing surgery



 
October 2010
A. Shlomai, A. Nutman, T. Kotlovsky, V. Schechner, Y. Carmeli and H. Guzner-Gur

Background: A pandemic (H1N1) influenza A virus was identified in 2009.

Objectives: To investigate predictors for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection among hospitalized patients with a flu-like illness and to identify parameters suggesting a severe clinical course.

Methods: We analyzed a cohort of all patients hospitalized during a 2 month period with a flu-like syndrome who were tested for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 infection. Demographic, clinical and laboratory, along with outcome parameters, were recorded and compared between pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus-positive and negative hospitalized patients.

Results: Of the 179 examined hospitalized patients suspected of having pandemic (H1N1) 2009 infection 65 (36%) were found positive. These patients tended to be younger and had significantly fewer comorbidities. In addition, they had a significantly higher frequency of fever (94%), cough (86%) and myalgia (29%). Furthermore, age < 65 years and cough were independent predictors for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus positivity in a multivariate regression analysis. Notably, 14 of the 65 positive patients (21.5%) had acute respiratory insufficiency requiring treatment in the intensive care unit. These patients were neither older nor previously sicker than patients with non-severe disease, but were distinguished by augmented inflammatory markers, significant lymphopenia associated with disease severity, and overall mortality of 21.4%.

Conclusions: Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus-positive hospitalized patients tend to be younger and have fewer comorbidities as compared to compatible negative patients. A significant number of relatively young and previously healthy positive patients might develop severe disease associated with a robust inflammatory reaction and significant lymphopenia.

January 2010
B. Zafrir, A. Laor and H. Bitterman

Background: Parallel to increased life expectancy, the number of very elderly patients hospitalized in internal medicine departments is growing rapidly, although clinical data on hospital care are lacking.

Objectives: To investigate the sociodemographic data, hospitalization characteristics and outcomes of nonagenarian patients, as these measures are necessary for evaluating prognostic information and predictors of mortality.

Methods: We reviewed the medical records of all patients aged ≥ 90 hospitalized in our institute's Department of Internal Medicine. The data comprised 482 admissions of 333 patients hospitalized over a one year period.

Results: Half of the study patients were residents of nursing institutions. A high rate of atrial fibrillation was documented (106 patients, 32%). Acute infectious diseases constituted the leading diagnosis (276/482 admissions, 57%), followed by acute coronary syndrome (17% of admissions). In-hospital mortality occurred in 74 patients (22%). Chronic therapy with statins or acetylsalicylic acid was inversely related to mortality (P < 0.05). The main predictors for in-hospital death of nonagenarians were pressure sores, older age, atrial fibrillation, malignant disease, and admission due to an acute infection, especially Clostridium difficile-associated diseases. In addition, mental decline, permanent urinary catheter, leukocytosis, renal failure and hypoalbuminemia predicted post-discharge mortality. Admission due to an infectious disease but not acute coronary syndrome was significantly correlated to in-hospital and post-discharge mortality (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: Hospitalized nonagenarians comprise a growing group with distinct characteristics and increasing significance in the daily practice of internal medicine departments. Comprehensive assessment of the elderly at admission together with identification of the above clinical and laboratory risk factors for mortality will help determine in-hospital management, discharge planning and rehabilitation programs.

December 2009
O. Barak, R. Elazary, L. Appelbaum, A. Rivkind and G. Almogy

Background: Current treatment options for acute calculous cholecystitis include either early cholecystectomy, or conservative treatment consisting of intravenous antibiotics and an interval cholecystectomy several weeks later. Percutaneous drainage is reserved for patients in whom conservative therapy failed or as a salvage procedure for high risk patients.

Objective: To identify clinical and radiographic factors leading to failure of conservative treatment.

Methods: We prospectively collected data on consecutive patients admitted with the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Parameters were compared between patients who were successfully treated conservatively and those who required percutaneous cholecystostomy. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors for failure of conservative treatment. 

Results: The study population comprised 103 patients with a median age of 60 who were treated for acute cholecystitis. Twenty-seven patients (26.2%) required PC[1]. On univariate analysis, age above 70 years, diabetes, elevated white blood cell count, tachycardia (> 100 beats/min) at admission, and a distended gallbladder (> 5 cm transverse diameter) were found to be significantly more common in the PC group (P < 0.001). WBC[2] was higher in the PC group throughout the initial 48 hours. On multivariate analysis, age above 70 (odds ratio 3.6), diabetes (OR[3] 9.4), tachycardia at admission (OR 5.6), and a distended gallbladder (OR 8.5) were predictors for cholecystostomy (P < 0.001). Age above 70 (OR 5.2) and WBC > 15,000 (OR 13.7) were predictors for failure of conservative treatment after 24 and 48 hours (P < 0.001). 

Conclusions: Age above 70, diabetes, and a distended gallbladder are predictors for failure of conservative treatment and such patients should be considered for early cholecystostomy. Persistently elevated WBC (> 15,000) suggests refractory disease and should play a central role in the clinical follow-up and decision-making process for elderly patients with acute cholecystitis.


 




[1] PC = percutaneous cholecystostomy



[2] WBC = white blood cells



[3] OR = odds ratio


December 2007
M. Bala, Y. Edden, Y. Mintz, D. Kisselgoff, I. Gercenstein, A.I. Rivkind, M. Farugy and G. Almogy

Background: Non-operative management of blunt splenic trauma is the preferred option in hemodynamically stable patients.

Objectives: To identify predictors for the successful non-operative management of patients with blunt splenic trauma.

Methods: The study group comprised consecutive patients admitted with the diagnosis of blunt splenic trauma to the Department of Surgery, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center in Jerusalem over a 3 year period. Prospectively recorded were hemodynamic status, computed tomography grade of splenic tear, presence and extent of extra-abdominal injury, number of red blood cell units transfused, and outcome. Hemodynamic instability and the severity of associated injuries were used to determine the need for splenectomy. Hemodynamically stable patients without an indication for laparotomy were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit and monitored.

Results: There were 64 adults (45 males, mean age 30.2 years) who met the inclusion criteria. On univariate analysis the 13 patients (20.3%) who underwent immediate splenectomy were more likely to have lower admission systolic blood pressure (P = 0.001), Glasgow Coma Scale < 8 (P = 0.02), and injury to at least three extra-abdominal regions (P = 0.06). Nine of the 52 patients (17.3%) who were successfully treated non-operatively suffered from grade ≥4 splenic tear. Multivariate analysis identified admission systolic BP[1] (odds ratio 1.04) and associated injury to less than three extra-abdominal regions (OD[2] 8.03) as predictors for the success of non-operative management, while the need for blood transfusion was a strong predictor (OR 66.67) for splenectomy.

Conclusions: Admission systolic blood pressure and limited extra-abdominal injury can be used to identify patients with blunt splenic trauma who do not require splenectomy and can be safely monitored outside an ICU[3] environment. 

 






[1] BP = blood pressure

[2] OD = odds ratio

[3] ICU = Intensive Care Unit


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