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עמוד בית
Tue, 28.05.24

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January 2024
Karam Azem MD, Shai Fein MD MHA, Yuri Matatov MD, Philip Heesen MD, Leonid A Eidelman MD, Michael Yohay Stav MD, Yoel Shufaro MD PhD, Sharon Orbach-Zinger MD, Cristian Arzola MD MSc

Background: Pulmonary aspiration is a potentially lethal perioperative complication that can be precipitated by gastric insufflation. Face mask ventilation (FMV), a ubiquitous anesthetic procedure, can cause gastric insufflation. FMV with an inspiratory pressure of 15 cm H2O provides the best balance between adequate pulmonary ventilation and a low probability of gastric insufflation. There is no data about the effects of FMV > 120 seconds.

Objectives: To investigate the effect of prolonged FMV on gastric insufflation.

Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study at a tertiary medical center with female patients who underwent oocyte retrieval surgery under general anesthesia FMV. Pre- and postoperative gastric ultrasound examinations measured the gastric antral cross-sectional area to detect gastric insufflation. Pressure-controlled FMV with an inspiratory pressure of 15 cm H2O was continued from the anesthesia induction until the end of the surgery.

Results: The study comprised 49 patients. Baseline preoperative gastric ultrasound demonstrated optimal and good image quality. All supine measurements were feasible. The median duration of FMV was 13 minutes (interquartile range 9–18). In the postoperative period, gastric insufflation was detected in only 2 of 49 patients (4.1%). There was no association between the duration of FMV and delta gastric antral cross-sectional area (β -0.01; 95% confidence interval -0.04 to 0.01, P = 0.31).

Conclusions: Pressure-controlled FMV with an inspiratory pressure of 15 cm H2O carries a low incidence of gastric insufflations, not only as a bridge to a definitive airway but as an alternative ventilation method for relatively short procedures in selective populations.

September 2022
The Rubrum Coelis Group*, and Jacob Chen MD MHA MSc, Alex Dobron BMedSc MOccH, Akiva Esterson BEMS MD, Lior Fuchs MD, Elon Glassberg MD MHA MBA, David Hoppenstein MBBCh, Regina Kalandarev-Wilson BEMS MD, Itamar Netzer MD MBA, Mor Nissan BEMS, Rachelly Shifer Ovsiovich DMD, Raphael Strugo MD, Oren Wacht BEMS MHA PhD, Chad G. Ball MD MSc FRCSC FACS, Naisan Garraway CD MD FRCSC FACS, Lawrence Gillman MD MMedEd FRCSC FACS, Andrew W. Kirkpatrick MD CD MHSc FRCSC FACS, Volker Kock CD MB, Paul McBeth MD MASc FRCS(C), Jessica McKee BA MSc, Juan Wachs PhD, and Scott K. d’Amours MDCM FRCSC FRACS FACS

Background: Handheld ultrasound devices present an opportunity for prehospital sonographic assessment of trauma, even in the hands of novice operators commonly found in military, maritime, or other austere environments. However, the reliability of such point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) examinations by novices is rightly questioned. A common strategy being examined to mitigate this reliability gap is remote mentoring by an expert.

Objectives: To assess the feasibility of utilizing POCUS in the hands of novice military or civilian emergency medicine service (EMS) providers, with and without the use of telementoring. To assess the mitigating or exacerbating effect telementoring may have on operator stress.

Methods: Thirty-seven inexperienced physicians and EMTs serving as first responders in military or civilian EMS were randomized to receive or not receive telementoring during three POCUS trials: live model, Simbionix trainer, and jugular phantom. Salivary cortisol was obtained before and after the trial. Heart rate variability monitoring was performed throughout the trial.

Results: There were no significant differences in clinical performance between the two groups. Iatrogenic complications of jugular venous catheterization were reduced by 26% in the telementored group (P < 0.001). Salivary cortisol levels dropped by 39% (P < 0.001) in the telementored group. Heart rate variability data also suggested mitigation of stress.

Conclusions: Telementoring of POCUS tasks was not found to improve performance by novices, but findings suggest that it may mitigate caregiver stress.

May 2018
Batsheva Tzadok MD, Shay Shapira and Eran Tal-Or MD

Background: When a patient arrives at the emergency department (ED) presenting with symptoms of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), it is possible to reach a definitive diagnosis through many different venues, including medical history, physical examination, echocardiography, chest X-ray, and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has become a mainstream tool for diagnosis and treatment in the field of emergency medicine, as well as in various other departments in the hospital setting. Currently, the main methods of diagnosis of ADHF using POCUS are pleural B-lines and inferior vena cava (IVC) width and respiratory variation.

Objectives: To examine the potential use and benefits of bedside ultrasound of the jugular veins in the evaluation of dyspneic patients for identification of ADHF.

Methods: A blood BNP level was drawn from each participant at time of recruitment. The area and size of the internal jugular vein (IJV) during inspiration and expiration were examined.

Results: Our results showed that the respiratory area change of the IJVs had a specificity and sensitivity of nearly 70% accuracy rate in indentifying ADHF in our ED.

Conclusions: Ultrasound of the IJV may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of ADHF because it is easy to measure and requires little skill. It is also not affected by patient body habitus.

November 2016
Efrat Avinadav MD, Anastasia Almog MD, Dragan Kravarusic MD, Emanuelle Seguier MD, Inbal Samuk MD, Adrianna Nika MD and Enrique Freud MD

Background: Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is becoming a common tool for routine use in emergency medicine, anesthesiology and intensive care for diagnostic and interventional purposes. When a portable ultrasound device became available for the department of Pediatric and Adolescent Surgery at the Schneider's Children Medical Center of Israel, we added POCUS assessments to the physician's daily rounds. POCUS is performed by pediatric surgeons trained in basic ultrasonography skills. Starting September 2015 all POCUS examinations were documented. 

Objectives: To describe the current use, diagnostic and therapeutic impacts of POCUS in a department of pediatric and adolescent surgery. 

Methods: We conducted an observational study of all the documented POCUS procedures performed during a half-year period. Data regarding patient condition and the POCUS procedures were collected, as well as data on the use of other diagnostic modalities, mainly formal ultrasound exams (by radiologists) and computed tomography scans and their correlation with the POCUS assessment. 

Results: Fifty-one POCUS exams were performed during the study period, most of which served to define the presence and resolution of a collection – intraabdominal (34%) and subcutaneous (31%). Despite a high rate for formal diagnostic studies (65%), probably due to a relative lack of confidence of surgeons performing the POCUS exams during this initial period, most results (92%) were compatible. 

Conclusions: The ability and availability to perform multiple POCUS exams by the attending physician proved to be a valuable aide to the classical physical and laboratory examinations of surgical patients, and we predict its increasing use in quotidian practice. 

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