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עמוד בית
Thu, 30.05.24

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January 2023
Muhamed Masalha MD, Lev Shlizerman MD, Salim Mazzawi MD, Ophir Handzel MD, Firas Kassem MD, Daniel Briscoe MD, Kfir Siag MD

Background: Chronic suppurative otitis media is a long-standing middle ear infection with a perforated tympanic membrane. Tympanoplasty is the mainstay of treatment. Most surgeons prefer to operate on dry ears; however, this may be difficult to achieve.

Objectives: To investigate the effect of otorrhea and positive cultures on the outcome of tympanoplasty.

Methods: This retrospective analysis reviewed patients with chronic suppurative otitis media who underwent tympanoplasty 2008–2015. Patients were divided into three groups: active discharge and bacterial growth, active discharge without bacterial growth, and no ear discharge. Surgical outcomes were compared among the groups.

Results: Among 101 patients included, 43 ears (42.6%) had discharge preoperatively, 58 (57.4%) were dry. Overall closure rate was 81.2% (82/101). Preoperative active discharge closure rate was 88.3% (38/43) and without discharge 75.9% (44/58). There were 38 positive cultures preoperatively and five negative cultures. Cultures were not obtained in 58 cases. Success rates were 89.5%, 80%, and 75.9%, respectively. No significant difference was found between patients who had positive or negative cultures before the procedure (P > 0.48) or among the three groups (P = 0.25). The most common bacteria were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=17), followed by Staphylococcus species (n=10). None was significantly associated with operative failure (P = 0.557). The postoperative air threshold difference was not affected by culture results (P = 0.3).

Conclusions: Tympanoplasty success rates and postoperative air threshold differences were not affected by the presence of preoperative otorrhea or positive ear cultures. Surgery can be performed even when the ear is not dry.

December 2022
Noam Bartov MD, Tzofit Dahan MD, Doron Halperin MD, Udi Katzenell MD

Background: Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) otologic manifestations include conductive and sensorineural hearing loss (HL). Vasculitis is assumed to be the primary cause of otologic manifestations. Deaf patients and patients with HL who do not benefit from hearing aids can benefit from cochlear implants (CI). There are currently no specific guidelines for treatment of patients with GPA suited for CI.

Objectives: To assess whether patients who are deaf due to GPA are good candidates for CI and if prior surgical or medical treatment of the inflammation are needed.

Methods: A case report is presented.

Results: A 71-year-old female patient with GPA and bilateral profound HL underwent CI. Prior to CI, preparation consisted of audiological evaluations by an otolaryngologist and a rheumatologist, followed by a course of prednisone and methotrexate for middle ear and nasal inflammations. CI was performed with no complications. The speech reception threshold and the monosyllabic word discrimination score after surgery were 25 dBHL and 75%, respectively.

Conclusions: Inflammation due to GPA can be controlled medically with immunosuppressive medications without subtotal petrosectomy, as in chronic suppurative otitis media. Satisfactory audiological results can be expected.

February 2021
Kfir Siag MD, Salim Mazzawi MD, Ariel Koren MD, Raul Colodner PhD, Muhamed Masalha MD, Roy Biener MD, Nidal Moed MD, Rami Ghanayim MD, and Carina Levin MD PhD

Background: Otogenic cerebral sinus vein thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare but severe complication of otitis media in children. To date, the role of prothrombotic evaluation is still controversial.

Objectives: To report the clinical manifestations, prothrombotic evaluation, and current management of CSVT.

Methods: We performed a retrospective study of nine pediatric patients with otogenic CSVT who underwent prothrombotic evaluation between 2008 and 2018.

Results: Prominent clinical features included persistent otorrhea (88.8%), signs of mastoiditis (88.8%), high fever ≥ 38.3°C (100%), a classic spiking fever pattern (55.5%), and neurological signs (55.5%). A subperiosteal abscess (66.6%) was the most common otitis media complication associated with mastoiditis and CSVT. No microorganism was identified in 55.5% of patients. Cultures collected from ear secretions had a low yield (6.25%). However, PCR assays had a high detection rate (100%; n=3). The prothrombotic evaluation demonstrated an abnormal LAC–dRVVT ratio (6/9), elevated Factor VIII (5/8) (and a combination of both in four patients), antiphospholipid antibodies (2/8), and high homocysteine levels (1/5).The surgical intervention of choice included one-sided mastoidectomy with myringotomy and ventilation-tube placement on the affected side (77.7%). There were no mortalities and no long-term sequela except chronic otitis media (22.2%).

Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate good outcomes for otogenic CSVT treatment with intravenous antibiotics, anticoagulation, and conservative surgical intervention, which supports the current trend in management. The prothrombotic evaluation revealed transient inflammation-related risk factors but did not alter management. Further prospective multicenter studies are needed to determine its relevance

July 2008
August 2002
Tatiana Smolkin, MD, Imad R. Makhoul, MD, DSc and Polo Sujov, MD
September 1999
Ittai Shavit, MD, Naim Shehadeh, MD, Osnat Zmora, MD, Israela Avidor, MD, and Amos Etzioni, MD.
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