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עמוד בית
Sat, 15.06.24

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January 2023
Matan Elkan MD, Yarden Zohar MD, Shani Zilberman-Itskovich MD, Ronit Zaidenstein MD, Ronit Koren MD

Background: Higher body mass index (BMI) has been shown to be a protective factor from mortality in sepsis patients. Yet, whether this effect is different in the very elderly is currently unknown.

Objective: To investigate the relationship between BMI and sepsis outcomes in patients older and younger than 80 years of age.

Methods: A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients admitted with sepsis to Shamir Medical Center, Israel, was conducted. We compared patients older than and younger than 80 years of age with a BMI higher and lower than 25 kg/m² for hospitalization outcomes.

Results: Patients older than 80 years presented with multiple co-morbidities compared to younger patients, but with no difference between BMI groups. Similarly, hospitalization outcomes of functional deterioration, discharge to long-term care facilities, and readmission were not significantly different between BMI groups in the same age category. Mortality was significantly different between BMI groups in patients older than 80 years of age, with higher mortality in BMI < 25 kg/m²: in-hospital mortality (23.4% vs. 14.9%, P < 0.001), 30-day mortality (27.6% vs. 17.9%, P < 0.001), and 90-day mortality (43.4% vs. 28.9%, P < 0.001). This difference was not significant between the groups younger than 80 years old. On logistic regression, BMI over 25 kg/m² was protective in all mortality categories. Nevertheless, there was no significant interaction between age over 80 years to BMI over 25 kg/m² in all mortality outcomes.

Conclusions: Among patients hospitalized with sepsis, higher BMI is a protective factor against mortality in both elderly and younger patients.

December 2019
Daniel Solomon MD, Oleg Kaminski MD, Ilan Schrier MD, Hanoch Kashtan MD and Michael Stein MD

Background: Older age is an independent predictor of worse outcome from traumatic brain injury (TBI). No clear guidelines exist for the management of TBI in elderly patients.

Objectives: To describe the outcomes of elderly patients presenting with TBI and intracranial bleeding (ICB), comparing a very elderly population (≥ 80 years of age) to a younger one (70–79).

Methods: Retrospective analysis of the outcomes of elderly patients presenting with TBI with ICB admitted to a level I trauma center.

Results: The authors analyzed 100 consecutive patients aged 70–79 and 100 patients aged 80 and older. In-hospital mortality rates were 9% and 21% for groups 70–79 and ≥ 80 years old, respectively (P = 0.017). Patients 70–79 years old showed a 12-month survival rate of 73% and a median survival of 47 months. In patients ≥ 80 years old, 12-month survival was 63% and median survival was 27 months (P = NS). In patients presenting with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of ≥ 8, the in-hospital mortality rates were 41% (n=5/12) and 100% (n=8/8). Among patients ≥ 80 years old undergoing emergent surgical decompression, in-hospital mortality was 66% (n=12/18). Survivors presented with a severe drop in their functional score. Survival was dismal in patients ≥ 80 years old who were treated conservatively despite recommended operative guidelines.

Conclusions: There is a lack of reliable means to evaluate the outcome in patients with poor functional status at baseline. The negative prognostic impact of severe TBI is profound, regardless of treatment choices.

October 2005
S. Yust-Katz, M. Katz-Leurer, L. Katz, Y. Lerman, K. Slutzki and A. Ohry.
 Background: Population structures are changing across the western world, with particularly rapid growth in the number of very old people. Life expectancy has been increasing gradually over years, resulting in a larger subpopulation of people aged 90 and over.

Objectives: To describe the sociodemographic, medical and functional characteristics of people aged 80–90 and 90+ who were admitted to a sub-acute geriatric hospital and to compare the hospitalization outcomes between these subgroups.

Methods: We compared the demographic and clinical data (extracted by means of chart review) of two groups of elderly who were admitted to the Reuth Medical Center during 2001–2002: those aged 90+ and those 80–89. Among survivors, the main outcome measures at discharge were mortality rate, functional ability, and place of residence.

Results: The study included 108 patients who were admitted to different divisions of Reuth: 55 patients aged 90+ and 53 aged 80–90. The mortality rate was significantly elevated in the older age group (49.1% vs. 28.1% in the younger age group) on multivariate analysis. The most important prognostic factors for mortality were incontinence (odds ratio 3.45) and being dependent before admission (OR[1] 4.76). Among survivors an association was found between being incontinent and dependent before hospitalization, and being dependent on discharge.

Conclusions: The main prognostic factors for mortality and functional outcome in patients admitted to a non-acute geriatric hospital are incontinence and functional state prior to admission, and not age per se.

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[1] OR = odds ratio

October 2003
R. Gerrah, U. Izhar, A. Elami, El Milgalter, E. Rudis and G. Merin

Background: Cardiac surgery is being performed with increasing frequency in patients aged 80 years and older.

Objectives: To examine the long and short-term results of surgery in this age group.

Methods: We retrospectively investigated 202 consecutive patients aged 80 years or older who underwent cardiac surgery between 1991 and 1999. Ninety-six operations (48%) were urgent.

Results: The study group comprised 140 men (69%) and 62 women (31%) with a mean age of 82.1 years (range 80–89). Preoperatively, 120 patients (59%) had unstable angina, 37 (18%) had left main coronary artery disease, 22 (11%) had renal failure, 17 (8.5%) had a history of stroke, and 13 (6.5%) had previous cardiac surgery. Hospital mortality for the whole group was 7.4%. Postoperative complications included: re-exploration for bleeding in 15 (7.4%), stroke in 8 (4%), sternal wound infection in 3 (1.5%), low cardiac output in 17 (8.4%), new Q wave myocardial infarction in 5 (2.5%), renal failure in 17 (8.5%), and atrial fibrillation in 71 (35%). The actuarial survival for patients discharged from the hospital was 66% at 5 years and 46% at 8 years. The type of surgical procedure was significantly associated with increased early mortality (coronary artery bypass grafting only in 2.9%, CABG[1] + valve in 16.1%, valve only in 16.7%; P = 0.01). Significant predictors (P < 0.05) for late mortality included type of surgical procedure, congestive heart failure, and postoperative low cardiac output.

Conclusions: When appropriately applied in selected octogenarians, cardiac surgery can be performed with acceptable mortality and good long-term results.






[1] CABG = coronary artery bypass grafting


May 2003
D.S Silverberg, D. Wexler, M. Blum, D.Schwartz, G. Keren, D. Sheps, and A. Iaina

Background: Congestive heart failure is extremely common in octogenarians and is associated with severe fatigue, shortness of breath, recurrent hospitalizations, and death. These patients, many of whom are anemic, are often resistant to standard CHF[1] therapy including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers and diuretics.

Objectives: To examine whether correction of the anemia (hemoglobin <12 g/dl) in CHF patients lowers their resistance to therapy.

Methods: Forty octogenarians with anemia and severe resistant CHF were administered a combination of subcutaneous erythropoietin and intravenous iron sucrose.

Results: This combination therapy led to a marked improvement in cardiac function, shortness of breath and fatigue, a marked reduction in the rate of hospitalization and a stabilizing of renal function.

Conclusion: Anemia appears to be an important but ignored contributor to the progression of CHF, and its correction may improve cardiac and renal status as well as the quality of life in elderly patients.






[1] CHF = congestive heart failure


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