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עמוד בית
Tue, 23.07.24

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November 2021
Guy Feldman MD, Yoram A. Weil MD, Ram Mosheiff MD, Amit Davidson MD, Nimrod Rozen MD PhD, and Guy Rubin MD

Background: Toward the end of 2019, the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic began to create turmoil for global health organizations. The illness, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), spreads by droplets and fomites and can rapidly lead to life-threatening lung disease, especially for the old and those with health co-morbidities. Treating orthopedic patients, who presented with COVID-19 while avoiding nosocomial transmission, became of paramount importance.

Objectives: To present relevant methods for pandemic control and hospital accommodation with emphasis on orthopedic surgery.

Methods: We searched search PubMed and Google Scholar electronic databases using the following keywords: COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, screening tools, personal protective equipment, and surgery triage.

Results: We included 25 records in our analysis. The recommendations from these records were divided into the following categories: COVID-19 disease, managing orthopedic surgery in the COVID-19 era, general institution precautions, triage of orthopedic surgeries, preoperative assessment, surgical room setting, personal protection equipment, anesthesia, orthopedic surgery technical precautions, and department stay and rehabilitation.

Conclusions: Special accommodations tailored for each medical facility, based on disease burden and available resources can improve patient and staff safety and reduce elective surgery cancellations. This article will assist orthopedic surgeons during the COVID-19 medical crisis, and possibly for future pandemics

March 2013
S. Luria, G. Rivkin, M. Avitzour, M. Liebergall, Y. Mintz and R. Mosheiff
 Background: Explosion injuries to the upper extremity have specific clinical characteristics that differ from injuries due to other mechanisms.

Objectives: To evaluate the upper extremity injury pattern of attacks on civilian targets, comparing bomb explosion injuries to gunshot injuries and their functional recovery using standard outcome measures.

Methods: Of 157 patients admitted to the hospital between 2000 and 2004, 72 (46%) sustained explosion injuries and 85 (54%) gunshot injuries. The trauma registry files were reviewed and the patients completed the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (DASH) and Short Form-12 (SF-12) after a minimum period of 1 year.

Results: Of the 157 patients, 72 (46%) had blast injuries and 85 (54%) had shooting injuries. The blast casualties had higher Injury Severity Scores (47% over a score of 16 vs. 22%, P = 0.02) and higher percent of patients treated in intensive care units (47% vs. 28%, P = 0.02). Although the Abbreviated Injury Scale score of the upper extremity injury was similar in the two groups, the blast casualties were found to have more bilateral and complex soft tissue injuries and were treated surgically more often. No difference was found in the SF-12 or DASH scores between the groups at follow up.  

Conclusions: The casualties with upper extremity blast injuries were more severely injured and sustained more bilateral and complex soft tissue injuries to the upper extremity. However, the rating of the local injury to the isolated limb is similar, as was the subjective functional recovery.

 

October 2005
Y. Barzilay, M. Liebergall, O. Safran, A. Khoury and R. Mosheiff
 Background: Pelvic fracture is a severe and life-threatening injury that requires treatment by a dedicated team. One of the goals of a nationwide trauma system is to provide appropriate medical care for such injuries.

Objectives: To use pelvic fractures as a test case for the efficiency of the Israeli trauma system, as reflected in the experience of our medical center.

Methods: Data were obtained from the medical charts of all cases of pelvic fractures admitted to our medical center between 1987 and 1999. We obtained demographic data, information on the cause of injury, fracture classification, co-injuries and Injury Severity Score, treatment strategies, and mortality rate.

Results: Altogether, 808 patients with pelvic injuries were treated in our medical center. The most common cause of injury was motor vehicle accidents (51%). Pelvic fractures without acetabular involvement were diagnosed in 58% of patients and isolated acetabular fractures in 32%, while 10% sustained combined injuries to the pelvic ring and the acetabulum. The overall rate of operative stabilization was 34%. The majority of patients had associated injuries, mostly additional musculoskeletal injuries. Altogether, 13% were referred from Level II/III trauma centers. We observed an increase in the total number of local admissions, in the percentage of referred patients and in the percentage of operated patients during the study period. The observed mortality rate was 5%.

Conclusions: Our results show a more than twofold increase in the percentage of referred patients following the designation of a Level I trauma center. These referrals result not only from the designation as a Level I trauma center, but also from the presence of a dedicated team of pelvic fracture specialists, available 24 hours a day. In addition, a larger percentage of patients undergo surgery for internal fixation of pelvic fractures, in accordance with current worldwide trends.

June 2002
Yoav Mattan, MD, Alice Dimant, MD, Rami Mosheiff, MD, Amos Peyser, MD, Steven Mendelson, MD and Meir Liebergall, MD

Background: Femoral hip fractures are a common occurrence in the elderly. Of the various fracture patterns, intertrochanteric injuries have the lowest rate of complications. Case reports of ensuing subcapital fracture have all been linked to incorrect placement of fixation devices or to osteomyelitis, while cases of avascular necrosis have only been reported rarely in the literature and are considered to occur at the rare rate of 0.8%.

Objectives: To check the incidence and outcome of AVN[1] in intertrochanteric hip fractures.

Methods and Results: In a retrospective analysis of patients who had surgical treatment for intertrochanteric fractures, 10 patients (0.5%) underwent dynamic hip screw fixation for intertrochanteric fractures and subsequently developed painful AVN as their primary presentation. Three of these patients were also found to have subcapital fractures. On revision of the primary fixation no fault was found with nail placement.

Conclusions: The reported rate of AVN may be understated since many patients have limiting factors that prevent them from consulting a physician when in pain, and one-third of these patients die within 2 years. Therefore, we suggest that hip pain following fixation of an intertrochanteric fracture should prompt the clinician to consider the rare possibility of AVN or subcapital fracture.

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[1] AV = avascular necrosis

May 2002
Adi Friedman, MD, Yizhar Floman, MD, Shabtai Sabatto, MD, Ori Safran, MD and Rami Mosheiff, MD

Background: As air travel increases and the number of commercial and non-commercial flights rises so does the number of aircraft accidents. The improved safety standards of the aviation industry result in a growing number of survivors of aircraft crashes, but there are no management guidelines for the treatment of aircraft crash survivors.

Objectives: To present our experience in treating five survivors of a light aircraft crash that occurred in August 1995 near Jerusalem.

Results: All five survivors sustained vertebral column injuries, which was the only injury in most of the survivors. We discuss the mechanism of injury.

Conclusions: Investigation of injuries’ pattern in survivors of aircraft crash is important for establishing management protocols in trauma centers.
 

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