• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Sun, 14.04.24

Search results


October 2023
Shiri Keret MD, Aniela Shouval MD, Michael Lurie MD, Gleb Slobodin MD

A 52-year-old man with a history of gout presented to the emergency department with painful purulent ulcers on the left index finger. Serum C-reactive protein was elevated to 112 mg/L. Hand radiographs [Figure 1A] demonstrated almost complete osteolysis of the two distal phalanges of the involved finger (asterisk), with multiple typical gouty erosions with sclerotic margins and overhanging edges in a marginal and juxta-articular distribution (white arrows), and soft tissue tophi (black arrows). Osteomyelitis of the index finger was suspected, and the finger was amputated.

March 2017
Andrew Villion MD, Zeev Arinzon MD, Jacob Feldman MD, Oded Kimchi MD and Yitshal Berner MD

Background: Arthritis and arthralgia are painful symptoms experienced by many elderly patients during hospitalization. Crystal-induced arthritis (CIA) is one of the most common causes of arthritis worldwide and represents the most common cause of acute arthritis in the elderly.  

Objective: To determine the incidence of both acute new onset or acute exacerbation of CIA among elderly patients hospitalized due to an acute medical illness.

Method: This study comprised 85 patients. Patients aged 70 years and older who complained of any articular pain were included in the study. Exclusion criteria were signs of septic arthritis, chronic use of steroids or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or admission to the hospital due to an acute attack of CIA. 

Results: Synovial aspiration was performed in 76 patients (89%). Joint aspiration yielded a diagnosis in 67 of them (79%). The predominant type of crystal was calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate (68%) followed by monosodium urate (20%). The main causes of hospitalization were acute infectious disease (57%) followed by neurologic and cardiac diseases, 14% and 9% respectively, and orthopedic problems (6%). Among patients with acute infectious disease, the main causes were pulmonary (57%) and gastrointestinal (22%) infections. In 9 patients (12%) who underwent synovial aspiration, visible crystals were identified without a definite diagnosis.

Conclusion: Our study showed that hospitalization could be a risk factor for the development of CIA, and the time to diagnose CIA is during hospitalization for other acute illnesses.

 

November 2015
Roni Peleg MD and Yulia Treister-Goltzman MD
May 2005
T. Monos, J. Levy, T. Lifshitz and M. Puterman
 Patients with silent sinus syndrome typically present for investigation of facial asymmetry. Unilateral, spontaneous enophthalmos and hypoglobus are the prominent findings at examination. Imaging of the orbit and sinuses characteristically show unilateral maxillary sinus opacification and collapse with inferior bowing of the orbital floor. It has been suggested that SSS[1] is due to hypoventilation of the maxillary sinus secondary to ostial obstruction and sinus atelectasis with chronic negative pressure within the sinus. Treatment involves functional endoscopic sinus surgery for reestablishing a functional drainage passage, and a reconstructive procedure of the floor of the orbit for repairing the hypoglobus and cosmetic deformity. Ophthalmologists, otorhinolaryngologists, and radiologists must be familiarized with this relatively newly reported disease.







[1] SSS = silent sinus syndrome


April 2005
November 2004
J. Levy, M. Puterman, T. Lifshitz, M. Marcus, A. Segal and T. Monos

Background: In patients with Graves’ ophthalmopathy, orbital decompression surgery is indicated for compressive optic neuropathy, severe corneal exposure, or for cosmetic deformity due to proptosis. Traditionally this has been performed through a transantral approach, but the associated complication rate is high. More recently, endoscopic orbital decompression has been performed successfully with significantly fewer postoperative complications.

Objective: To report our experience of endoscopic orbital decompression in patients with severe Graves’ ophthalmopathy.

Methods: Three patients (five eyes) underwent endoscopic orbital decompression for Graves’ ophthalmopathy at Soroka Medical Center between the years 2000 and 2002. The indications for surgery were compressive optic neuropathy in three eyes, severe corneal exposure in one eye, and severe proptosis not cosmetically acceptable for the patient in one case. An intranasal endoscopic approach with the removal of the medial orbital wall and medial part of the floor was performed.

Results: In all five eyes an average reduction of 5 mm in proptosis was achieved. Soon after surgery, visual acuity improved in the three cases with compressive optic neuropathy, and exposure keratopathy and cosmetic appearance improved. The diplopia remained unchanged. No complications were observed postoperatively.

Conclusions: Endoscopic orbital decompression with removal of the medial orbital wall and medial part of the floor in the five reported eyes was an effective and safe procedure for treatment of severe Graves’ ophthalmopathy. A close collaboration between ophthalmologists and otorhinolaryngologists skilled in endoscopic sinus surgery is crucial for the correct management of these patients.

September 2004
J. Levy, T. Monos, J. Kapelushnik, E. Maor, M. Nash and T. Lifshitz

Histiocytosis of childhood is characterized by localized or generalized proliferation of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system and the dendritic cell system. In patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis, the orbita is the most involved site encountered in ophthalmic practice, usually as a lytic lesion in the zygomaticofrontal suture. Patients usually present with acute or chronic periorbital swelling. Electron microscopic findings of Birbeck granules and positive staining for CD1 antigenic determinant confirm the diagnosis.

Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel