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עמוד בית
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November 2008
Michal Tenenbaum, Shahar Lavi, Nurit Magal, Gabrielle J. Halpern, Inbal Bolocan, Monther Boulos, Michael Kapeliovich, Mordechai Shohat, Haim Hammerman

Background: Long QT syndrome is an inherited cardiac disease, associated with malignant arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death.

Objectives: To map and identify the gene responsible for LQTS[1] in an Israeli family.

Methods: A large family was screened for LQTS after one of them was successfully resuscitated from ventricular fibrillation. The DNA was examined for suspicious loci by whole genome screening and the coding region of the LQT2 gene was sequenced.

Results: Nine family members, 6 males and 3 females, age (median and interquartile range) 26 years (13, 46), who were characterized by a unique T wave pattern were diagnosed as carrying the mutant gene. The LQTS-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 7 with the A614V mutation. All of the affected members in the family were correctly identified by electrocardiogram. Corrected QT duration was inversely associated with age in the affected family members and decreased with age.
Conclusions: Careful inspection of the ECG can correctly identify LQTS in some families. Genetic analysis is needed to confirm the diagnosis and enable the correct therapy in this disease







[1] LQTS = long QT syndrome


April 2007
E. Markusohn, A. Roguin, A. Sebbag, D. Aronson, R. Dragu, S. Amikam, M. Boulus, E. Grenadier, A. Kerner, E. Nikolsky, W. Markiewicz, H. Hammerman and M. Kapeliovich

Background: The decision to perform primary percutaneous coronary intervention in unconscious patients resuscitated after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is challenging because of uncertainty regarding the prognosis of recovery of anoxic brain damage and difficulties in interpretation of ST segment deviations. In ST elevation myocardial infarction patients after OHCA[1], primary PCI[2] is generally considered the only option for reperfusion. There are few published studies and no randomized trial has yet been performed in this specific group of patients.

Objectives: To define the demographic, clinical and angiographic characteristics, and the prognosis of STEMI[3] patients undergoing primary PCI after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of medical records and used the prospectively acquired information from the Rambam Primary Angioplasty Registry (PARR) and the Rambam Intensive Cardiac Care (RICCa) databases.

Results: During the period March1998 to June 2006, 25 STEMI patients (21 men and 4 women, mean age 56 ± 11years) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were treated with primary PCI. The location of myocardial infarction was anterior in 13 patients (52%) and non-anterior in 12 (48%). Cardiac arrest was witnessed in 23 patients (92%), but bystander resuscitation was performed in only 2 patients (8%). Eighteen patients (72%) were unconscious on admission, and Glasgow Coma Scale > 5 was noted in 2 patients (8%). Cardiogenic shock on admission was diagnosed in 4 patients (16%). PCI procedure was successful in 22 patients (88%). In-hospital, 30 day, 6 month and 1 year survival was 76%, 76%, 76% and 72%, respectively. In-hospital, 30 day, 6 month and 1 year survival without severe neurological disability was 68%, 68%, 68% and 64%, respectively.

Conclusions: In a selected group of STEMI patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, primary PCI can be performed with a high success rate and provides reasonably good results in terms of short and longer term survival.

 







[1] OHCA = out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

[2] PCI = percutaneous coronary intervention

[3] STEMI = ST elevation myocardial infarction


August 2000
Haim Hammerman MD and Michael Kapeliovich MD PhD

Background: Iatrogenic illness, defined as a disease that results from a diagnostic procedure or from any form of therapy, is a well-recognized phenomenon in clinical practice.

Objectives: To study and evaluate major car-diac iatrogenic disease as the cause of admission to the intensive cardiac care unit in the modern era.

Methods: We assessed 64 critically ill patients suffering from major cardiac iatrogenic problems among a total of 2,559 patients admitted to the intensive cardiac care unit during 3 years. Iatro-genic illness was defined as any problem that resulted from therapy. Only cardiac problems were included in the study. Complications of interventional cardiovascular procedures, suicide attempts or accidental intoxications were ex-cluded.

Results: There was evidence of a major cardiac iatrogenic problem as the cause for admission in 64 patients (2.5%): 58 (91%) suffered from ar-rhythmias (mainly bradyarrhythmias) secondary to beta-blockers, amiodarone, calcium antago-nists, electrolyte imbalance or a combination, and 6 (9%) had non-arrhythmic events (hypotension, syncope or acute heart failure). In 41 patients (64%) the iatrogenic event was considered pre-ventable

Conclusions: Major cardiac iatrogenic compli-cations are an important factor among patients admitted to the intensive cardiac care unit. Most of the events are bradyarrhythmias related to anti-arrhythmic agents. Almost two-thirds of events are preventable.

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