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July 2018
Eilon Ram MD, Leonid Sternik MD, Alexander Lipey MD, Sagit Ben Zekry MD, Ronny Ben-Avi MD, Yaron Moshkovitz MD and Ehud Raanani MD

Background: Unicuspid and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) are congenital cardiac anomalies associated with valvular dysfunction and aortopathies occurring at a young age.

Objectives: To evaluate our experience with aortic valve repair (AVr) in patients with bicuspid or unicuspid aortic valves.

Methods: Eighty patients with BAV or unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) underwent AVr. Mean patient age was 42 ± 14 years and 94% were male. Surgical technique included: aortic root replacement with or without cusp repair in 43 patients (53%), replacement of the ascending aorta at the height of the sino-tubular junction with or without cusp repair in 15 patients (19%), and isolated cusp repair in 22 patients (28%).

Results: The anatomical structure of the aortic valve was bicuspid in 68 (85%) and unicuspid in 12 patients (15%). Survival rate was 100% at 5 years of follow-up. Eleven patients (13.7%) underwent reoperation, 8 of whom presented with recurrent symptomatic aortic insufficiency (AI). Late echocardiography in the remaining 69 patients revealed mild AI in 63 patients, moderate recurrent AI in 4, and severe recurrent AI in 2. Relief from recurrent severe AI or reoperations was significantly lower in patients who underwent cusp repair compared with those who did not (P = 0.05). Furthermore, the use of pericardial patch augmentation for the repair was a predictor for recurrence (P = 0.05).

Conclusions: AVr in patients with BAV or UAV is a safe procedure with low morbidity and mortality rates. The use of a pericardial patch augmentation was associated with higher repair failure.

February 2016
Amjad Shalabi MD, Ehud Raanani MD, Amihai Shinfeld MD, Rafael Kuperstein MD, Alexander Kogan MD, Alexander Lipey MD, Eyal Nachum MD and Dan Spiegelstein MD

Background: Prolonged life expectancy has increased the number of elderly high risk patients referred for surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). These referred high risk patients may benefit from sutureless bioprosthesis procedures which reduce mortality and morbidity.

Objectives: To present our initial experience with sutureless aortic bioprotheses, including clinical and echocardiographic results, in elderly high risk patients referred for AVR. 

Methods: Forty patients (15 males, mean age 78 ± 7 years) with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis underwent AVR with the 3F Enable™ or Perceval™ sutureless bioprosthesis during the period December 2012 to May 2014. Mean logistic EuroScore was 10 ± 3%. Echocardiography was performed preoperatively, intraoperatively, at discharge and at follow-up.

Results: There was no in-hospital mortality. Nine patients (22%) underwent minimally invasive AVR via a right anterior mini-thoracotomy and one patient via a J-incision. Four patients underwent concomitant coronary aortic bypass graft, two needed intraoperative repositioning of the valve, one underwent valve exchange due to inappropriate sizing, three (7.5%) had a perioperative stroke with complete resolution of neurologic symptoms, and one patient (2.5%) required permanent pacemaker implantation due to complete atrioventricular block. Mean preoperative and postoperative gradients were 44 ± 14 and 13 ± 5 mmHg, respectively. At follow-up, 82% of patients were in New York Heart Association functional class I and II.

Conclusions: Sutureless AVR can be used safely in elderly high risk patients with relatively low morbidity and mortality. The device can be safely implanted via a minimally invasive incision. Mid-term hemodynamic results are satisfactory, demonstrating significant clinical improvement.

 

October 2007
A. Lipey, A. Kogan, T. Ben-Gal, E. Mor, A. Stamler, B. Medalion, B.A. Vidne, E. Porat and G. Sahar
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