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עמוד בית
Sun, 25.09.22

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August 2021
Omer Or MD, Tamar Fisher Negev PharmD, Vered Hadad MD, Ran Shabtai MD, Alona Katzir MD, Yoram Wei MD, and Meir Liebergall MD

Background: Osteoporosis is a common medical condition in older ages. A devastating result of osteoporosis may be a hip fracture with up to 30% mortality rate in one year. The compliance rate of osteoporotic medication following a hip fracture is 20% in the western world.

Objectives: To evaluate the impact of the fracture liaison service (FLS) model in the orthopedic department on patient compliance following hip fracture

Methods: We performed a retrospective review of all patients with hip fracture who were involved with FLS. We collected data regarding kidney function, calcium levels, parathyroid hormone levels, and vitamin D levels at admission. We educated the patient and family, started vitamin D and calcium supplementation and recommended osteoporotic medical treatment. We phoned the patient 6–12 weeks following the fracture to ensure treatment initiation.

Results: From June 2018 to June 2019 we identified 166 patients with hip fracture who completed at least one year of follow-up. Over 75% of the patients had low vitamin D levels and 22% had low calcium levels at admission. Nine patients (5%) died at median of 109 days. Following our intervention, 161 patients (96%) were discharged with a specific osteoporotic treatment recommendation; 121 (73%) received medication for osteoporosis on average of < 3 months after surgery. We recommended on injectable medications; however, 51 (42%) were treated with oral biphsophonate.

Conclusions: FLS improved the compliance rate of osteoporotic medical treatment and should be a clinical routine in every medical center

March 2013
S. Luria, G. Rivkin, M. Avitzour, M. Liebergall, Y. Mintz and R. Mosheiff
 Background: Explosion injuries to the upper extremity have specific clinical characteristics that differ from injuries due to other mechanisms.

Objectives: To evaluate the upper extremity injury pattern of attacks on civilian targets, comparing bomb explosion injuries to gunshot injuries and their functional recovery using standard outcome measures.

Methods: Of 157 patients admitted to the hospital between 2000 and 2004, 72 (46%) sustained explosion injuries and 85 (54%) gunshot injuries. The trauma registry files were reviewed and the patients completed the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (DASH) and Short Form-12 (SF-12) after a minimum period of 1 year.

Results: Of the 157 patients, 72 (46%) had blast injuries and 85 (54%) had shooting injuries. The blast casualties had higher Injury Severity Scores (47% over a score of 16 vs. 22%, P = 0.02) and higher percent of patients treated in intensive care units (47% vs. 28%, P = 0.02). Although the Abbreviated Injury Scale score of the upper extremity injury was similar in the two groups, the blast casualties were found to have more bilateral and complex soft tissue injuries and were treated surgically more often. No difference was found in the SF-12 or DASH scores between the groups at follow up.  

Conclusions: The casualties with upper extremity blast injuries were more severely injured and sustained more bilateral and complex soft tissue injuries to the upper extremity. However, the rating of the local injury to the isolated limb is similar, as was the subjective functional recovery.

 

October 2005
Y. Barzilay, M. Liebergall, O. Safran, A. Khoury and R. Mosheiff
 Background: Pelvic fracture is a severe and life-threatening injury that requires treatment by a dedicated team. One of the goals of a nationwide trauma system is to provide appropriate medical care for such injuries.

Objectives: To use pelvic fractures as a test case for the efficiency of the Israeli trauma system, as reflected in the experience of our medical center.

Methods: Data were obtained from the medical charts of all cases of pelvic fractures admitted to our medical center between 1987 and 1999. We obtained demographic data, information on the cause of injury, fracture classification, co-injuries and Injury Severity Score, treatment strategies, and mortality rate.

Results: Altogether, 808 patients with pelvic injuries were treated in our medical center. The most common cause of injury was motor vehicle accidents (51%). Pelvic fractures without acetabular involvement were diagnosed in 58% of patients and isolated acetabular fractures in 32%, while 10% sustained combined injuries to the pelvic ring and the acetabulum. The overall rate of operative stabilization was 34%. The majority of patients had associated injuries, mostly additional musculoskeletal injuries. Altogether, 13% were referred from Level II/III trauma centers. We observed an increase in the total number of local admissions, in the percentage of referred patients and in the percentage of operated patients during the study period. The observed mortality rate was 5%.

Conclusions: Our results show a more than twofold increase in the percentage of referred patients following the designation of a Level I trauma center. These referrals result not only from the designation as a Level I trauma center, but also from the presence of a dedicated team of pelvic fracture specialists, available 24 hours a day. In addition, a larger percentage of patients undergo surgery for internal fixation of pelvic fractures, in accordance with current worldwide trends.

March 2005
S. Eylon, R. Wishnitzer and M. Liebergall
August 2003
S. Luria, L. Kandel, D. Segal, M. Liebergall and Y. Mattan

Background: Revision of total knee arthroplasties are performed with increasing frequency due to the increasing numbers of primary arthroplasties.

Objectives: To retrospectively analyze 71 patients who underwent 78 revision total knee arthroplasties during the years 1991 to 1999

Methods: We evaluated the revised knees using the Knee Society Clinical Rating System after an average follow-up period of 3 years and 9 months (2–10 years). The indications for revision included pain and instability, deep infection of the joint, complaints linked to the patella, or post-trauma to the operated knee.

Results: The average knee score (evaluation of the knee joint itself) calculated after the revision was 74.5. The results on the knee score were excellent (>85) in 48% of patients and poor (<60) in 22%. The functional results (patients’ ability to walk and climb stairs) were only 48.3.

Conclusion: Although the revision of total knee replacements is known to be problematic, most patients show good results on knee examination, and reasonable functional results given the factors involved.

June 2002
Yoav Mattan, MD, Alice Dimant, MD, Rami Mosheiff, MD, Amos Peyser, MD, Steven Mendelson, MD and Meir Liebergall, MD

Background: Femoral hip fractures are a common occurrence in the elderly. Of the various fracture patterns, intertrochanteric injuries have the lowest rate of complications. Case reports of ensuing subcapital fracture have all been linked to incorrect placement of fixation devices or to osteomyelitis, while cases of avascular necrosis have only been reported rarely in the literature and are considered to occur at the rare rate of 0.8%.

Objectives: To check the incidence and outcome of AVN[1] in intertrochanteric hip fractures.

Methods and Results: In a retrospective analysis of patients who had surgical treatment for intertrochanteric fractures, 10 patients (0.5%) underwent dynamic hip screw fixation for intertrochanteric fractures and subsequently developed painful AVN as their primary presentation. Three of these patients were also found to have subcapital fractures. On revision of the primary fixation no fault was found with nail placement.

Conclusions: The reported rate of AVN may be understated since many patients have limiting factors that prevent them from consulting a physician when in pain, and one-third of these patients die within 2 years. Therefore, we suggest that hip pain following fixation of an intertrochanteric fracture should prompt the clinician to consider the rare possibility of AVN or subcapital fracture.

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[1] AV = avascular necrosis

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