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עמוד בית
Wed, 19.06.24

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May 2021
Mor Aharoni MD, Yiftach Barash MD, Yaniv Zager MD, Roi Anteby MD, Saed Khalilieh MD, Imri Amiel MD, Eyal Klang MD, Yuri Goldes MD, Mordechai Gutman MD FACS, Nir Horesh MD, and Danny Rosin MD FACS

Background: The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) outbreak had an effect on healthcare.

Objectives: To evaluate the presentation and management of patients with acute appendicitis.

Methods: A retrospective study was conducted of all patients presenting with acute appendicitis to the emergency department of a large tertiary center during March and April 2020. Clinical features, diagnostic workup, and management were compared.

Results: Seventy-four patients presented with acute appendicitis during the pandemic compared to 60 patients during the same time the year before. There were no significant differences in patient demographics: age (P = 0.65), gender (P = 0.73), smoking status (P = 0.48). During COVID-19 patients were more likely to complain of right lower quadrant pain (100% vs. 78.3%, P < 0.01). Rates of surgical treatment was similar (83.8% vs. 81.7%, P = 1); mean operative time was longer during COVID-19 (63 ± 23 vs. 52 ± 26 minutes, P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in intra-operative findings including the presence of appendiceal perforation (16.3% vs. 14.5%, P = 0.8), abscess (6.1% vs. 9.7%, P = 0.73), or involvement of cecum or terminal ileum (14.28% vs. 19.63%, P = 1). Postoperative treatment with antibiotics was more prevalent during COVID-19 (37.1% vs. 18%, P = 0.04). Length of stay (1.82 ± 2.04 vs. 2.74 ± 4.68, P = 0.2) and readmission rates (6% vs. 11.3%, P =0.51) were similar.

Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic did not significantly affect the presentation, clinical course, management, and outcomes of patients presenting with acute appendicitis.

November 2020
Eyal Aviran MD, Shachar Laks MD FACS, Haggai Benvenisti MD, Saed Khalilieh MD, Dan Assaf MD, Nimrod Aviran MD, David Hazzan MD, Yoram Klein MD, Amir Cohen MD, Mordechai Gutman MD, Aviram Nissan MD, and Lior Segev MD

Background: As part of the effort to control the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) outbreak, strict emergency measures, including prolonged national curfews, have been imposed. Even in countries where healthcare systems still functioned, patients avoided visiting emergency departments (EDs) because of fears of exposure to COVID-19.

Objective: To describe the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak on admissions of surgical patients from the ED and characteristics of urgent operations performed.

Methods: A prospective registry study comparing all patients admitted for acute surgical and trauma care between 15 March and 14 April 2020 (COVID-19) with patients admitted in the parallel time a year previously (control) was conducted.

Results: The combined cohort included 606 patients. There were 25% fewer admissions during the COVID-19 period (P < 0.0001). The COVID-19 cohort had a longer time interval from onset of symptoms (P < 0.001) and presented in a worse clinical condition as expressed by accelerated heart rate (P = 0.023), leukocyte count disturbances (P = 0.005), higher creatinine, and CRP levels (P < 0.001) compared with the control cohort. More COVID-19 patients required urgent surgery (P = 0.03) and length of ED stay was longer (P = 0.003).

Conclusions: During the COVID-19 epidemic, fewer patients presented to the ED requiring acute surgical care. Those who did, often did so in a delayed fashion and in worse clinical condition. More patients required urgent surgical interventions compared to the control period. Governments and healthcare systems should emphasize to the public not to delay seeking medical attention, even in times of crises

August 2019
Khalil Salame MD, Alon Grundshtein MD, Gilad Regev MD, Morsi Khashan MD, Ran Lador MD and Zvi Lidar MD

Spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) is commonly used as an effective therapeutic modality for a range of cervical symptoms. However, in rare cases, cervical manipulation may be associated with complications. In this review we present a series of cases with cervical spine injury and myelopathy following therapeutic manipulation of the neck, and examine their clinical course and neurological outcome. We conducted a search for patients who developed neurological symptoms due to cervical spinal cord injury following neck SMT in the database of a spinal unit in a tertiary hospital between the years 2008 and 2018. Patients were assessed for the clinical course and deterioration, type of manipulation used and subsequent management. A total of four patients were identified, two men and two women, aged 32–66 years. In three patients neurological deterioration appeared after chiropractic adjustment and in one patient after tuina therapy. Three patients were managed with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion while one patient declined surgical treatment. Assessment for subjective and objective evidence of cervical myelopathy should be performed prior to cervical manipulation, and suspected myelopathic patients should be sent for further workup by a specialist familiar with cervical myelopathy (such as a neurologist, a neurosurgeon or orthopedic surgeon who specializes in spinal surgery). Nevertheless, manipulation therapy remains an important and generally safe treatment modality for a variety of cervical complaints. This review does not intend to discard the role of SMT as a significant part in the management of patients with neck related symptoms, rather it is meant to draw attention to the need for careful clinical and imaging investigation before treatment.

January 2015
Khalil Salame MD, Gilad Regev MD, Ory Keynan MD and Zvi Lidar MD

Background: Most spine tumors are resistant to radiation and chemotherapy. Complete surgical removal provides the best chance for long-term control of the tumor. Total en bloc spondylectomy (TES) is a radical new technique that entails total removal of the tumor and affected vertebras with clean margins.

Objectives: To review our initial experience with TES, focusing on feasibility, surgical challenges and the short-term outcome.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the hospitalization charts and follow-up data of all patients treated with TES for spine tumors in the spine unit at Tel Aviv Medical Center.

Results: TES was performed in 12 patients aged 13–78 years. Nine patients had primary spinal tumors and three had metastasis. Total en bloc removal was achieved in all cases with spondylectomy of one to three affected vertebras. There was no perioperative mortality and only one major intraoperative complication of injury to a major blood vessel. Late complications were mainly related to hardware failure.

Conclusions: Total en bloc spondylectomy is feasible and effective for the management of selected patients with extradural spinal tumors. Since the surgical procedure is demanding and carries significant risk, careful preoperative evaluation and collaboration with colleagues from other specialties are crucial.

September 2007
O. Tamir, R. Peleg, J. Dreiher, T. Abu-Hammad, Y. Abu Rabia, M. Abu Rashid, A. Eisenberg, D. Sibersky, A. Kazanovich, E. Khalil, D. Vardy and P. Shvartzman

Background: Until three decades ago coronary heart disease and stroke were considered rare in the Israeli Bedouin population. Today, this population shows increasing high prevalence compared to the Jewish population.

Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of diagnosed cardiovascular risk factors among the Bedouin (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia), and to assess compliance with follow-up tests and drug treatment.

Methods: The study included all listed patients aged 20 years and older in eight clinics in major Bedouin towns, and in two large teaching clinics in Beer Sheva (Jewish population). Risk factor data were extracted from the clinics' computerized databases. For those diagnosed with hypertension, diabetes or dyslipidemia, drug purchasing data were collected from the pharmacy database to determine compliance with treatment, and from the central laboratory mainframe (HbA1c and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol) to evaluate follow-up and control.

Results: A significantly higher prevalence of diabetes in all age groups was found in the Bedouin population compared to the Jewish population; age-adjusted results show a prevalence of 12% vs. 8% respectively (P < 0.001). The prevalence of dyslipidemia and age-adjusted hypertension was lower among Bedouins (5.8% vs. 18.2%, P < 0.01 and 17% vs. 21%, P < 0.001 respectively). Two-thirds of hypertensive Bedouin patients and 72.9% of diabetic Bedouin patients were not compliant with treatment. For dyslipidemia only 10.4% of the Bedouins were compliant compared with 28.2% in the Jewish population (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: Compliance with drug therapy and follow-up tests was found to be a major problem in the Bedouin population.
 

August 2003
K. Salame, G.E.R. Ouaknine, S. Rochkind, S. Constantini and N. Razon

Background: Spasticity is a common neurologic disorder with adverse effects on the patient's function. Conservative management is unsuccessful in a significant proportion of patients and neurosurgical intervention should be considered. The mainstay of surgical treatment of spasticity is selective posterior rhizotomy, i.e., section of sensory nerve roots of the cauda equina.

Objective: To report our experience with selective posterior rhizotomy in the treatment of spasticity.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed our experience in 154 patients who underwent SPR during 30 years. The indication for surgery was spasticity that significantly hindered the patient's function or care and was resistant to conservative treatment. All patients were evaluated for spasticity in the lower and upper limbs, the presence or absence of painful spasms, and sphincter disturbances. The decision

as to which roots to be sectioned, and to what extent, was based mainly on clinical muscle testing.

Results: Reduction of spasticity in the lower limbs was obtained in every case, with improvement in movements in 86% of cases. Painful spasms were alleviated in 80% of cases. Amelioration of neurogenic bladder was observed in 42%. A minority of the patients also showed improvement in speech and cognitive performance. There was no perioperative mortality or major complications.

Conclusion: SPR is a safe and effective method for the treatment of spasticity with long-lasting beneficial effects. We suggest that this method be considered more frequently for patients with spasticity that interferes with their quality of life.

April 2001
Ofer N. Gorfit, MD and Khalil Abu-Dalu, MD

Background: Despite years of research and clinical experience with acute appendicitis, the rate of complications in the pediatric age group continues to be high.

Objective: To characterize the profile of the child with appendicitis complicared by perforation or intraabdominal abscess.

Methods: Between 1 January 1985 and 31 December 1997 in our department, 581 children under the age of 14 years were clinically diagnosed as suffering from "acute appendici­tis". The final diagnoses were: white appendix in 28 cases (4.8%), acute non-complicated appendicitis in 472 (81%), and complicated appendicitis in 81 (13.9%), including 51 cases of free perforation (8.7%) and 30 cases of intraabdominal abscess (5.2%). We retrospectively reviewed the charts of all children with complicated appendicitis and those of 70 randomly selected children with non-complicated appendicitis, and compared patient age, gender, weight percentile, past medical history, and course of the illness.

Results: The children with complicated appendicitis were significantly younger (R~4.8*10~7), they had higher oral and rectal temperatures (P=7.9*10-8), higher platelet count (P=0.0008) and lower hemoglobin level (P=0.004). No difference was found in white blood count (P=0.41). Total delay from symptom onset to surgery was 33 hours (SD 23) in the non-complicated group, 60 hours (SD 38) in the perforated appendicitis group, and 176 hours (SD 107) in the intra­abdominal abscess group (P=4.6*10-8). No difference in intra­hospital delay was found.

Conclusions: Children with complicated appendicitis are characterized by younger age, longer delay from symptom onset to correct diagnosis, and typical laboratory findings. Delays in diagnosis can be avoided by first considering the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in the differential diagnosis when examining any child with abdominal pain.

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