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עמוד בית
Mon, 15.07.24

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August 2019
Tamar Laron-Kenet MD, Aviva Silbergeld MSc, Pearl Lilos BSc and Zvi Laron MD PhD (hc)
May 2019
Shahar Blechman MD, Yariv Fruchtman MD, Zvi H. Perry MD PhD, Julia Mazar PhD, Miriam Ben Harosh MD, Abuquidar Abed MD, Nurit Rozenberg PhD, Gila Kenet MD and Eugene Leibovitz MD

Background: Congenital factor VII deficiency is a rare recessive autosomal bleeding disorder with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations.

Objectives: To compare the clinical and laboratory findings in Jewish and Bedouin patients with factor VII deficiency.

Methods: The clinical and laboratory findings of patients with factor VII deficiency treated at Soroka Medical Center, a tertiary hospital in Israel, from 2005 to 2015 were analyzed regarding blood factor levels, illness severity, treatment administration, and disease outcome.

Results: Seventy-eight patients were enrolled (1:13,000 of the population in southern Israel) of whom 26 were diagnosed with severe factor VII deficiency (1:40,000). Sixty (76.9%) patients were Jewish and 18 (23.1%) were Bedouin. In univariable analysis, Bedouin patients exhibited a more severe illness, with significantly higher complication and fatality rates, and required more preventive treatment than the Jewish patients.

Conclusions: The prevalence of congenital factor VII deficiency (including severe deficiency) in the Jewish and Bedouin populations of southern Israel is higher than previously reported. The clinical spectrum of the disease was found to be more severe in the Bedouin population.

May 2017
Alon Farfel MD, Rona Rabinowicz MD, Gadi Abebe-Campino MD, Estela Derazne MsC, Tami Laron-Kenet MD and Zvi Laron MD
October 2009
T. Strauss, G. Kenet, I. Schushan-Eisen, R. Mazkereth and J. Kuint
January 2008
September 2001
Gabriel Kenet, MD, Joram Wardi, MD, Yona Avni, MD, Hussein Aeed, PhD, Haim Shirin, MD, Liliana Zaidel, MD, Rami Hershkovitz, MD and Rafael Bruck, MD

Background: Rectal administration of iodoacetamide induces colitis by blocking sulphhydryl groups and generating inflammatory mediators. Thalidomide, a non-barbiturate hyp­notic, also has an anti-inflammatory effect, presumably by suppressing the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha. In patients with Crohn’s disease, neutralization or suppression of TNFá reduces inflammation.

Objectives: To evaluate the effects of thalidomide in a model of experimental colitis.

Methods: Colitis was induced in rats by intracolonic administration of 3% iodoacetamide. In the treatment group, thalidomide 50 mg/kg was given daily by gavage and continued for 7 days until the rats were sacrificed. Their colons were then processed for wet weight, lesion area, weight of mucosal scraping, myeloperoxidase activity and histology. Serum levels of TNF were determined.

Results: Colonic wet weight, lesion area, myeloperoxidase activity and serum levels of TNFá were significantly lower (P<0.05) in the treatment group (iodoacetamide + thalido­mide) than the control group (iodoacetamide only). Histologi­cally, colonic inflammation in the treated group was markedly decreased.

Conclusions: Thalidomide effectively decreases colitis induced by iodoacetamide. The mechanism is probably associated with inhibition of TNFá, and should be further studied.
 

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