• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Mon, 15.07.24

Search results


January 2024
Isca Hershkowitz MD, Avivit Cahn MD, Tal Keidar Haran MD, Alon Y. Hershko MD PhD

Illicit drug abuse is a widespread medical problem with numerous sequelae. One of the major challenges in reaching a diagnosis is the difficulty in obtaining accurate details during the medical interview. We describe a patient who initially denied drug abuse while presenting a bizarre nasopharyngeal disease secondary to inhalation of oxycodone-acetaminophen powder.

December 2021
Myroslav Lutsyk MD, Konstantin Gourevich MD, and Zohar Keidar MD

Background: For locally advanced rectal cancer patients a watch-and-wait strategy is an acceptable treatment option in cases of complete tumor response. Clinicians need robust methods of patient selection after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

Objectives: To predict pathologic complete response (pCR) using computer vision. To analyze radiomic wavelet transform to predict pCR.

Methods: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation for patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma who passed computed tomography (CT)-based simulation procedures were examined. Gross tumor volume was examind on the set of CT simulation images. The volume has been analyzed using radiomics software package with wavelets feature extraction module. Statistical analysis using descriptive statistics and logistic regression was performed was used. For prediction evaluation a multilayer perceptron algorithm and Random Forest model were used.

Results: In the study 140 patients with II–III stage cancer were included. After a long course of chemoradiation and further surgery the pathology examination showed pCR in 38 (27.1%) of the patients. CT-simulation images of tumor volume were extracted with 850 parameters (119,000 total features). Logistic regression showed high value of wavelet contribution to model. A multilayer perceptron model showed high predictive importance of wavelet. We applied random forest analysis for classifying the texture and predominant features of wavelet parameters. Importance was assigned to wavelets.

Conclusions: We evaluated the feasibility of using non-diagnostic CT images as a data source for texture analysis combined with wavelets feature analysis for predicting pCR in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. The model performance showed the importance of including wavelets features in radiomics analysis.

September 2019
Erez Marcusohn MD, Danny Epstein MD, Anees Musallam MD, Zohar Keidar MD PHD and Ariel Roguin MD PHD

Background: With the recent introduction of high-sensitivity troponin (hsTn), the incremental benefit of stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in the evaluation of patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is unclear.

Objectives: To assess the added value of stress MPI in low-risk ACS patients with normal range hsTnI.

Methods: We analyzed all patients who were hospitalized at our medical center from February 2016 to November 2017, who presented with low-risk ACS and underwent stress MPI, and in whom hsTnI was in the normal range after the introduction of hsTnI.

Results: During the study period, 161 patients were admitted with a diagnosis of unstable angina (i.e., ACS with normal range hsTnI) and underwent stress MPI during index admission. The study population included 52/161 patients (31.7%) with low-risk ACS who had no indication for initial invasive strategy. No patients had positive MPI. One patient underwent coronary angiography due to suggestive history; however, he did not have a significant coronary artery disease and had no indication for percutaneous coronary intervention.

Conclusions: In patients with low-risk ACS and normal range hsTnI without additional high-risk features, stress MPI has little additional value for the correct diagnosis and management. Prospective studies are warranted to confirm whether resting hsTnI could serve as a powerful triage tool in chest pain patients in the ED before diagnostic testing and thus, improve patient management.

April 2019
Lotem Dafna MD, Hadas Ganer Herman MD, Shimon Ginath MD, Amir Shalev MD, Ram Kerner MD, Ran Keidar MD, Jacob Bar MD MsC and Ron Sagiv MD

Background: When a woman with an endometrioma presents with acute abdominal pain, it is unclear whether ovarian torsion should be suspected.

Objectives: To compare patient characteristics, imaging results, and surgical management of endometriomas in elective versus emergent surgeries.

Methods: This retrospective cohort study included women treated at our institution during the period 1990–2015 who presented with histologically verified endometrioma and who underwent either planned surgery or emergent surgery due to suspected adnexal torsion.

Results: Of 225 surgeries performed, 174 were elective and 51 emergent. Patients in the emergent group were significantly younger (33.9 ± 11.1 vs. 39.01 ± 10.9 years, P = 0.004). Abdominal pain was the main complaint of all the emergent surgery patients and the leading complaint in 21% of the elective surgery patients (P < 0.001), with right-sided predominance in both groups. Sonographic parameters were similar in both groups. Bilateral ovarian cysts were noted in 11.7% and 11.0% of emergent and elective patients, respectively (P = 0.87). Laboratory evaluation was notable for a higher white blood cell count and CA125 levels among emergent patients. All patients in the emergent group and 93% of patients in the elective group were managed laparoscopically. No cases of torsion were noted. The rate of intra-pelvic adhesions was similar in both groups (56.8% vs. 66.6%, P = 0.19).

Conclusions: Endometrioma may present with acute abdominal pain. However, adnexal torsion in these patients is rare. These cases can be managed using a minimally invasive approach, assuming an optimal surgical setting.

February 2013
S. Hamoud, R. Mahamid, M. Halabi, J. Lessick, S. Abbadi, R. Shreter, Z. Keidar, D. Aronson, H. Hammerman and T. Hayek
 Background: Chest pain is one of the most common reasons for emergency department visits and hospital admissions. Chest pain units (CPU) are being incorporated in tertiary hospitals for rapid and effective management of patients with chest pain. In Israel prior to 2010, only one chest pain unit existed in a tertiary hospital.

Objectives: To report our first year experience with a CPU located in an internal medicine department as compared to the year before establishment of the CPU.

Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of consecutive patients who were admitted to our internal medicine department for the investigation of chest pain for 2 different years: a year before and a year after the establishment of the CPU in the department. We focused on the patients' characteristics and the impact of the CPU regarding the investigational modalities used and the length of in-hospital stay.

Results: In the year before establishment of the CPU, 258 patients were admitted to our department with chest pain, compared to 417 patients admitted to the CPU in the first year of its operation. All patients were followed for serial electrocardiographic and cardiac enzyme testing. All CPU patients (100%) underwent investigation compared to only 171 patients (66%) in the pre-CPU year. During the year pre-CPU, 164 non-invasive tests were performed (0.64 tests per patient) compared to 506 tests (1.2 tests/patient) in the CPU population. Coronary arteriography was performed in 35 patients (14%) during the pre-CPU year, mostly as the first test performed, compared to 61 patients (15%) during the CPU year, mostly as a second test, with only 5 procedures (1.1%) being the first test performed. The length of hospitalization was significantly shorter during the CPU year, 37.8 ± 29.4 hours compared to 66.8 ± 46 hours in the pre-CPU year.

Conclusions: Establishment of a CPU in an internal medicine department significantly decreased the need for invasive coronary arteriography as the first modality for investigating patients admitted with chest pain, significantly decreased the need for invasive procedures (especially where no intervention was performed), and significantly shortened the hospitalization period. CPU is an effective facility for rapid and effective investigation of patients admitted with chest pain. 

December 2009
M. Waterman, B. Fuhrman, S. Keidar and T. Hayek


Background: Low density lipoprotein is a major pathogenic pathway in atherosclerosis. Previous studies suggested that aspirin, a commonly prescribed drug in patients with atherosclerosis, when given a dose of 300 mg/ day may decrease LDL susceptibility to oxidative modification. However, the effect of the more common lower dose aspirin on LDL oxidation is not known.


Objective: To examine the effect of aspirin administration (low dosage) on the susceptibility of LDL to oxidative modification healthy volunteers.

Methods: Aspirin 75 mg was administered daily for 2 weeks to 10 healthy volunteers selected from the medical staff and students at the faculty of medicine. The main outcome measure was ex vivo oxidation of LDL by ultraviolet C irradiation or by peroxyl free redicals generated by AAPH (2,2’ -azobis 2-amidinopropane hydrochloride). The extent of LDL oxidation was determined by measuring the formed amounts of thiobarbituric-acid reactive substances, lipid peroxides and conjugated dienes.

Results: Following exposure to UVC irradiation there was a significant (p<0.01) increase (10.8%) in TBARS concentrations and a significant (p≤0.05) increase (5.4%) in PD concentrations in LDL withdrawn after aspirin treatment as compared to LDL withdrawn before aspirin treatment. Following incubation with AAPH there was a significant (p<0.05) increase (15%) in PD concentrations and a significant (p<0.05) reduction (10%) of the LDL oxidation lag time in LDL withdrawn after aspirin intake as compared to LDL withdrawn before aspirin treatment.

Conclusions: Aspirin treatment given to healthy volunteers at a dose of 75 mg/day increased the susceptibility of their plasma LDL to oxidative modification ex vivo. Our study provides, for the first time, in vivo evidence of pro-oxidative properties of aspirin already suggested by previous in vitro trials.

May 2008
A. Khalaileh, I. Matot, C. Schweiger, L. Appelbum, R. Elazary and A. Keidar

Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is currently considered the gold standard surgical option for the treatment of morbid obesity. Open RYGB[1] is associated with a high risk of complications. Laparoscopic RYGB has been shown to reduce perioperative morbidity and improve recovery.

Objectives: To review our experience with laparoscopic RYGB during a 19 month period.

Methods: The data were collected prospectively. The study group comprised all patients who underwent laparoscopic RYGB for treatment of morbid obesity as their primary operation between February 2006 and July 2007. The reported outcome included surgical results, weight loss, and improved status of co-morbidities, with follow-up of up to 19 months.

Results: The mean age of the 50 patients was 36.7 years. Mean body mass index was 44.7 kg/m2 (range 35–76 kg/m2); mean duration of surgery was 171 minutes. There was no conversion to open surgery. The mean length of stay was 4 days (range 2–7 days). Five patients (10%) developed a complication, but none of them required early reoperation and there were no deaths. Mean follow-up was 7 months (range 40 days–19 months). The excess body weight loss was 55% and 61% at 6 and 12 months respectively. Diabetes resolved completely or significantly improved in all five patients with this condition, as did hypertension in eight patients out of nine.

Conclusions: Laparoscopic RYGB is feasible and safe. The results in terms of weight loss and correction of co-morbidities are comparable to other previously published studies. However, only surgeons with experience in advanced laparoscopic as well as bariatric surgery should attempt this procedure.






[1] RYGB = Roux-en-Y gastric bypass


March 2005
M. Ben-Haim, M. Carmiel, N. Lubezky, R. Keidar, P. Katz, A. Blachar, A. Nomrod, P. Sorkine, R. Oren, J.M. Klausner and R. Nakache
Background: Adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation is becoming an alternative to cadaveric transplantation in urgent and elective settings. Donor selection crucially affects donor safety and recipient outcome.

Objective: To present our algorithm of urgent and elective donor selection.

Methods: Urgent selection is expeditious and protocol‑based. Elective selection permits a comprehensive process. Both include medical, psychosocial and surgical-anatomic evaluations. Liver volumes and vascular anatomy are evaluated with computerized tomographic angiography. Informed consent is obtained after painstaking explanations. Independent institutional committees review and approve all cases.

Results: Between July 2003 and June 2004 we evaluated 43 potential live donors for 12 potential recipients (fulminant hepatic failure, n=5; chronic end-stage liver disease, n=6); primary graft non-function, n=1). Thirty-three candidates (76%) were excluded due to blood type incompatibility (n=14, 42%), incompatible anatomy (n=8, 24%) – including problematic volume distribution (n=2) or vascular anatomy (n=6) – psychosocial issues (n=4, 12%), or medical co-morbidity (n=7, 22%). Five recipients (FHF[1], n=4; chronic ESLD[2], n=1) were successfully transplanted from living donors. In the acute setting, two patients (FHF, PGNF[3]) died in the absence of an appropriate donor (cadaveric or living donor). In the elective group, one patient died of unexpected variceal bleeding and one received a cadaveric graft just before the planned living donor transplantation was performed. One candidate was transplanted overseas and two cases are scheduled. The ratio of compatibility for donation was 34% (10/29) for blood type-compatible candidates.

Conclusions: Donor selection for living donor liver transplantation is a complex, labor-intensive multidisciplinary process. Most exclusions are due to blood type incompatibility or anatomic details. Psychosocial aspects of these donations warrant special attention.

___________

[1] FHF = fulminant hepatic failure

[2] ESLD = chronic end-stage liver disease

[3] PGNF = primary graft non-function

February 2005
H. Tulchinsky, A. Keidar, G. Goldman, J.M. Klausner and M. Rabau

Background: Restorative proctocolectomy eliminates the risk of colorectal cancer in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. Complications and extra‑intestinal manifestations are inherent to the procedure.

Objectives: To evaluate operative procedures, complications, early and late results and long-term functional outcome in FAP[1] patients operated in our department.

Methods: The study group included all patients with FAP who were operated between 1988 and 2003. Demographic data, length of follow‑up, complications, colorectal cancer, pouch function and extracolonic manifestations were recorded.

Results: Median age at surgery was 33 years (range 13–61 years). The final operative breakdown was: 48 proctocolectomies, 41 ileal pouch-anal anastomoses, 2 Kock’s pouch, 5 permanent ileostomies, and 2 colectomies with ileorectal anastomosis. There was no perioperative mortality. Early and late complications occurred in 20 and 9 patients, respectively. Twelve patients required re‑operation. Colorectal carcinoma was diagnosed in eight patients, three of whom were in an advanced stage. The mean follow‑up was 74 months (range 3–288 months). Four patients were lost to follow‑up. Extracolonic manifestations developed in 38 patients, including desmoid tumors (in 12), duodenal adenomas (in 9), pouch adenomas (in 5), and rectal stump adenomas (in 3). Two patients died (4%) because of desmoid tumor and malignant fibrous histiocytoma. At last follow‑up, 37 IPAA[2] patients have (median) six bowel movements/24 hours and good fecal control.

Conclusions: Restorative proctocolectomy can be performed with low mortality, acceptable morbidity, and good functional results. Patients should be closely followed after surgery for development of other manifestations of the syndrome. Relatives of the affected patients should be referred to a specialist multidisciplinary clinic.

 






[1] FAP = familial adenomatous polyposis



[2] IPAA = ileal pouch-anal anastomosis


H. Tulchinsky, A. Keidar, G. Goldman, J.M. Klausner and M. Rabau
 Background: Restorative proctocolectomy eliminates the risk of colorectal cancer in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. Complications and extra‑intestinal manifestations are inherent to the procedure.

Objectives: To evaluate operative procedures, complications, early and late results and long-term functional outcome in FAP[1] patients operated in our department.

Methods: The study group included all patients with FAP who were operated between 1988 and 2003. Demographic data, length of follow‑up, complications, colorectal cancer, pouch function and extracolonic manifestations were recorded.

Results: Median age at surgery was 33 years (range 13–61 years). The final operative breakdown was: 48 proctocolectomies, 41 ileal pouch-anal anastomoses, 2 Kock’s pouch, 5 permanent ileostomies, and 2 colectomies with ileorectal anastomosis. There was no perioperative mortality. Early and late complications occurred in 20 and 9 patients, respectively. Twelve patients required re‑operation. Colorectal carcinoma was diagnosed in eight patients, three of whom were in an advanced stage. The mean follow‑up was 74 months (range 3–288 months). Four patients were lost to follow‑up. Extracolonic manifestations developed in 38 patients, including desmoid tumors (in 12), duodenal adenomas (in 9), pouch adenomas (in 5), and rectal stump adenomas (in 3). Two patients died (4%) because of desmoid tumor and malignant fibrous histiocytoma. At last follow‑up, 37 IPAA[2] patients have (median) six bowel movements/24 hours and good fecal control.

Conclusions: Restorative proctocolectomy can be performed with low mortality, acceptable morbidity, and good functional results. Patients should be closely followed after surgery for development of other manifestations of the syndrome. Relatives of the affected patients should be referred to a specialist multidisciplinary clinic.

____________________________

[1] FAP = familial adenomatous polyposis

[2] IPAA = ileal pouch-anal anastomosis

October 2003
N. Shimoni, M. Kaplan and S. Keidar

Background: Increased levels of high density lipoprotein (over 60 mg/dl) are considered to be a risk factor for ischemic heart disease. However, some patients with high HDL[1] still develop cardiovascular diseases.

Objective: To find out why patients with very high HDL still suffer from cardiovascular diseases.

Methods: We analyzed several risk factors, such as increased lipid peroxidation, hyperhomeocysteinemia and increased release of inflammatory molecules that could be related to the development of vascular disease in patients with high serum HDL levels. Patients with HDL cholesterol levels above 75 mg/dl were selected for this study and were separated into two groups based on the presence of atherosclerotic vascular disease, i.e., those with vascular disease (patients) and those without (controls).

Results: Plasma isolated from the patient group exhibited significantly increased lipid peroxidation by 21% and decreased total antioxidant status by 17%, but there were no differences regarding their serum or their paraoxonase activity. Moreover, both groups exhibited similar levels of serum C-reactive protein, fibrinogen and homocysteine, enabling us to eliminate these risk factors in the etiology of cardiovascular disease in the patient group.

Conclusion: Increased oxidative stress could be one of the factors leading to cardiovascular diseases in patients with high serum HDL levels.






[1] HDL = high density lipoprotein


August 2003
A. Mahajna, D.D. Hershko, S. Israelit, A. Abu-Salih, Z. Keidar and M.M. Krausz

Background: The histologic status of axillary lymph nodes is one of the most important prognostic factors in breast cancer, influencing the management of these patients. Axillary lymph node dissection was traditionally performed in all patients to obtain this information but this procedure carries a considerable rate of complications. Recently, sentinel lymph node biopsy has emerged as an accurate and minimally invasive tool for predicting the axillary nodal status and has become the standard of care in selected patients with breast cancer.

Objective: To examine the accuracy of SLN[1] biopsies performed by surgical residents during surgical resident training.

Methods: This prospective, randomized controlled study included 100 consecutive patients with clinically early breast cancer (T1-T2, N0, M0) study. Lymphatic mapping was performed using radiotracers, blue dye, or both. Formal axillary lymph node dissection completed the operations in all patients. All operations were performed by surgical residents under the supervision of senior surgeons.

Results: The overall rate of identification of sentinel lymph nodes was 92%. The accuracy of SLN biopsy in reflecting the axillary nodal status was 96% with a false negative rate of 5.7%.

Conclusions: Sentinel lymph node biopsy is an accurate method for the evaluation and staging of regional lymph nodes in breast cancer patients. A dedicated instruction program for surgical residents may increase the standard of care and lead to highly trained surgeons in the management of early breast cancer.

_________________________________


[1] SLN = sentinel lymph node

Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel