• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Tue, 23.07.24

Search results


March 2002
Alexander Kagan, MD, Nurit Haran, PhD, Ludmila Leschinsky, MD, PhD, Ruty Sarafian, RN, BA, Dan Aravot, MD, Jaffa Dolberg, RN, Ziv Ben-Ary, MD and Jason Rapoport, MB, BS, MRCP

Background: Leptin is a 16 kDa hormone synthesized by adipocytes and involved in body weight regulation.

Objectives: To determine serum leptin concentrations in heart, liver and kidney transplant recipients.

Methods: We investigated 57 patients: 18 male heart transplant recipients (age 25-69 years) at 1-66 months after transplantation, 6 female and 8 male liver transplant recipients (age 33-70) at 11-73 months after transplantation, and 10 female and 15 male kidney transplant recipients (age 20-61) at 3-138 months after transplantation. All recipients were receiving immunosuppressive therapy, including prednisone 0-20 mg/day, azathioprine 75-125 mg/day, cyclosporin 100-250 mg/day or tacrolimus 2-10 mg/day. The results were compared to those of 10 female and 10 male healthy controls. Morning serum concentrations of leptin were measured with a commercial radioimmunoassay (Linco Research Inc., USA), and serum insulin and cortisol levels were measured by radioimmunoassay.

Results: Patients (both men and women) after heart, liver and kidney transplantation exhibited significantly higher serum concentrations of leptin and leptin/body mass index ratios than controls. Serum leptin concentrations were significantly higher in women than in men and correlated very significantly with BMI[1] in all cases. The multivariate stepwise analyses showed that among parameters including BMI, gender, age, time after transplantation, prednisone dose, hematocrit, serum concentrations of glucose, albumin, creatinine, cortisol and insulin, only BMI, gender, cortisol and insulin were significant independent determinants of serum leptin levels in these patients.

Conclusions: This is the first report showing that, in addition to body mass index and gender, basal cortisol and insulin levels affect the hyperleptinemia in transplant patients. The clinical relevance of hyperleptinemia in these patients will require further investigation.






[1] BMI = body mass index



 
April 2001
Sergey Keidar, MD, Liat Ben-Sira, MD, Mark Weinberg, MD, Ariel J. Jaffa, MD, Aviel Silbiger, MD and Itzhak Vinograd, MD

Background: Routine prenatal ultrasound has increased the frequency of prenatal diagnosis of congenital cystic lung malformation, such as cystic adenomatoid malformation, pulmonary sequestration, congenital lobar emphysema, and bronchogenic cyst.

Objectives: To evaluate the methods of postnatal diag­nosis, the optimal age for operation since surgery is always required, and the optimal extent of lung resection.

Methods: The clinical courses of 11 patients with congenital lung cysts who underwent surgical lung resection (8 lobectomies and 3 segmentectomies) were reviewed.

Results: The diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography scan in all. In nine patients the diagnosis was made prenatally. Chest X-ray was normal postnatally in all patients except for two who had recurrent pneumonia. Post­operative follow-up showed excellent recovery in all operated children. One patient who underwent surgery for CCAM following episodes of severe pneumonia died from another cause 5 months later. Postoperative chest CT scan showed no residual disease in eight patients. In two who had undergone limited resection, tomography showed a small segment of residual disease in one and a suspected residual lesion in the other.

Conclusion: With prenatal ultrasound the true frequency of congenital cystic lung anomaly appears to be higher than previously reported. Postnatal CT is mandatory to confirm or to rule out the diagnosis. The mere presence of cystic lung malformation is an indication for surgery. Complete removal of the affected lung lobe is recommended. Segmental resection may be inadequate. Early operation is tolerated well by infants and small children and we recommend that surgery be performed in children between 6 and 12 months of age.

Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel