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עמוד בית
Sun, 21.04.24

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November 2021
Meydan Ben Ishai MD, Michal Schaap Fogler MD, Rita Ehrlich MD, Noa Geffen MD, Orly Gal-Or MD, Irit Bahar MD MHA, and Gad Dotan MD

Background: Eye trauma is an unfortunate and often preventable cause of vision loss. Confetti cannons are common causes of injury. Awareness of ocular hazards of confetti cannons remains low because of limited reports describing ophthalmic injuries following their use.

Objectives: To describe outcomes of ocular trauma caused by confetti cannons and to increase recognition of their ocular risks.

Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of eye injuries caused by confetti cannons presenting to a single medical center between 2016 and 2020. Data collected included age, gender, eye injured, ocular damage, visual outcome, and details of surgeries performed.

Results: Overall, six consecutive patients (2 males, mean age 19.5 ± 9.74 years) were identified and studied. In all patients only one eye was injured (3 right eyes) during a private celebration, most commonly (n=5) to a bystander while in the vicinity of a cannon operated by someone else. Most common eye injuries included corneal erosion (n=4), traumatic hyphema (n=4), and retinal edema (n=3). Mean initial logMAR visual acuity in the injured eye was 0.73 ± 0.18, improving to 0.25 ± 0.16 at the final visit (P = 0.125). Two patients underwent eye surgery due to their trauma: one to repair globe penetration and another to undergo intravitreal injection of tissue plasminogen activator and C3F8 for submacular hemorrhage, followed 8 months later by intravitreal bevacizumab injection for choroidal neovascularization.

Conclusions: Confetti cannons pose hazards that can cause severe ocular trauma resulting in permanent vision loss. Increasing awareness of device hazards is necessary to prevent eye injuries

December 2013
Michael Yulish, Noam Reshef, Aleks Lerner and Joseph Pikkel
 Background: Eye injuries are common in sports. Sports-related eye injuries have the potential for major morbidity.

Objectives: To investigate the occurrence and to classify sport-related eye trauma in northern Israel.

Methods: We analyzed the records of the ophthalmology emergency department for the years 2007–2011 and classified the admissions according to type, severity of injury and demographic data.

Results: In 2% of the patients the injuries occurred during a sport activity. Most of the injuries occurred during soccer, basketball or school sport activity (74%). The majority of patients were young males.

Conclusions: Most sports-related eye injuries can be prevented with adequate eye protection.

November 2002
Itzchak Beiran, MD, Tamar Talmon, MD and Benjamin Miller, MD

Background: The prevalence of traumatic hyphema as well as the distribution of its severity varies between different patient populations. Treatment recommendations in the literature differ significantly among various published reports. This lack of a uniformly accepted treatment probably reflects the different characteristics of this pathology among the populations investigated and calls for a population-adjusted treatment recommendation.

Objectives: To report the characteristics and functional outcome of patients with traumatic hyphema and to discuss possible recommendations regarding the use of ε‑aminocaproic acid.

Methods: A prospective, non-randomized study was conducted among 154 consecutive patients with traumatic hyphema, including data collection of ophthalmic status at various time points, the presence or absence of secondary hemorrhage, and final visual acuity.

Results: Of the 154 eyes studied over 3½ years, nearly 90% had hyphema of grade 1 or less, 3 (3.25%) experienced rebleeding, and 2 (1.3%) – neither of which rebled – needed surgical intervention. None of the four patients who experienced final visual acuity of 6/40 or less suffered rebleeding.

Conclusion: The use of ε‑aminocaproic acid in the studied population was unjustified and routine use of e-aminocaproic acid in our patient population is probably not indicated. A treatment policy regarding e-aminocaproic acid use should be adjusted to the population being treated.

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