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עמוד בית
Sat, 20.04.24

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October 2017
Neri Katz MD, Letizia Schreiber MD, Anat Oron MD, Sarel Halachmi MD and David Kohelet MD

Background: Preterm birth is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among neonates in the United States. Early recognition of sepsis in this population is a challenging task since overt clinical signs can be difficult to determine. C-reactive protein (CRP), one of the most frequently non-specific used laboratory test, can indirectly aid the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis.

Objectives: To evaluate the relationship between histological findings in the placenta of preterm newborns born after prolonged rupture of membranes, CRP levels, and blood cultures.

Methods: Medical records were reviewed of all preterm newborns born after prolonged premature rupture of membranes at a medical center in Israel between 2011 and 2014.

Results: Of 128 newborns with prolonged rupture of membranes, 64 had evidence of histological chorioamnionitis (HCA). Gestational age, birth weight, and Apgar scores were significantly lower, while CRP levels (on admission and 10–12 hours post-delivery) were significantly higher in preterm newborns born to mothers with histological evidence of chorioamnionitis, but values were within normal ranges. Duration of the rupture of membranes and white blood cell counts did not differ between groups.

Conclusions: CRP levels taken on admission and 10–12 hours after delivery were higher when HCA was present, but since there was a substantial overlap between those with and without HCA and the values for most were within normal range, the differences were not enough to serve as a tool to diagnose placental histological chorioamnionitis in preterm infants born after prolonged premature rupture of membranes and exposed to intrapartum antibiotics.

November 2016
Igor Sukhotnik MD, Igor Aranovich MD, Bshara Mansur MD, Ibrahim Matter MD, Yefim Kandelis MD and Sarel Halachmi MD

Background: The traditional surgical approach to the excision of persistent urachal remnants is a lower midline laparotomy or semicircular infraumbilical incision.

Objectives: To report our experience with laparoscopic/open urachus excision as a minimally invasive diagnostic and surgical technique.

Methods: This was a retrospective study involving patients who were diagnosed with persistent urachus and underwent laparoscopic/open excision. The morbidity, recovery, and outcomes of surgery were reviewed.

Results: Eight patients (males:females 6:2) with an age range of 1 month to 17 years underwent laparoscopic or open excision (six and two patients respectively). All patients presented with discharge from the umbilicus. Although three patients had no sonographic evidence of a patent urachus, diagnostic laparoscopy detected a patent urachus that was excised laparoscopically. The operative time of laparoscopic surgery ranged from 19 to 71 minutes (the last case was combined with bilateral laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair), and the mean duration of hospital stay was 2.0 ± 0.36 days. Pathological examination confirmed a benign urachal remnant in all cases.

Conclusions: Laparoscopy is a useful alternative for the management of persistent or infected urachus, especially when its presence is clinically suspected despite the lack of sonographic evidence. The procedure is associated with low morbidity, although a small risk of bladder injury exists, particularly in cases of severe active inflammation. 

 

November 2015
Zaher Bahouth MD, Rani Zreik MD, Assaf Graif MD, Ofer Nativ MD, Sarel Halachmi MD and Giora Pillar MD

Background: Erectile dysfunction (ED), a common problem in males of all ages, can be of organic, psychogenic or combined etiology. Organic ED is mainly caused by vascular and neurological disorders. One of the available tests for differentiating organic from inorganic ED is measuring penile tumescence and rigidity during the REM phase of sleep. However, this test lacks the ability to differentiate between a vascular and non-vascular cause of organic ED. 

Objectives: To compare the results of the EndoPAT test and the nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) test in patients with erectile dysfunction.

Methods: Twenty patients with ED were recruited for the study. Each participant was evaluated by the SHIM score, RigiScan during polysomnography, and two EndoPAT tests (at the beginning and end of the study).

Results: Seventeen patients had SHIM score ≤ 21; 4 of them had organic ED with a mean EndoPAT score of 1.49, significantly lower than the 1.93 mean EndoPAT score of the 11 patients in the psychogenic ED group (P = 0.047). Two participants had a neurological impairment (spinal trauma and herniated disk). The average SHIM score in the vascular organic group was 6.25 points as compared to 11.69 for the psychogenic group (P = 0.027). The positive predictive value was 43% and the negative predictive value 90%.

Conclusions: EndoPAT could be helpful in excluding organic ED.

 

September 2014
George Mogilner MD, Ofer Nativ MD and Sarel Halachmi MD
March 2011
S. Halachmi, B. Moskovitz, R. Farfara and O. Nativ

Background: One of the major concerns in performing nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the risk of tumor recurrence.

Objectives: To assess the rate, predictors and mechanisms of oncological failure in patients after NSS[1] for renal cancer.

Methods: Between 1993 and 2008 NSS was performed in 229 patients via flank incision. Only patients without metastases at diagnosis and minimal 12 months follow-up were included in the outcome analysis.

Results: During a mean follow-up of 45 ± 34 months (range 6–168 months) tumor recurrence was observed in 13 patients (5.6%). Mean follow-up time for detection of oncological failure was 51 months (range 6–132 months).  All patients with oncological failure were males, with a mean age of 61 years (median 58, range 51–74 years). The average size of the enucleated lesion was 5 cm (range 4–7 cm). Intraoperative frozen sections as well as postoperative final pathological examination of the surgical margins were negative in all recurrent cases. Mechanisms of recurrence were distant metastases (n=4), surgical scar implantation (n=2), perirenal fat recurrence (n=2), local renal recurrence at the surgical site (n=1), and new renal lesions (n=4). Predictors of oncological failure included warm ischemia time (P = 0.058), tumor size (P = 0.001), tumor location (central versus peripheral) (P = 0.015), and multifocality (P = 0.001).

Conclusions: Distant dissemination, seeding during surgery, residual disease and new growth are the mechanisms responsible for cancer relapse. Large central lesions, long warm ischemia time and multifocality were significant predictors of oncological failure.






[1] NSS = nephron-sparing surgery



 
March 2002
Moshe Wald, MD, Sarel Halachmi, MD, Gilad Amiel, MD, Shahar Madjar, MD, Michael Mullerad, MD, Ines Miselevitz, MD, Boaz Moskovitz, MD and Ofer Nativ, MD

Background: The bladder tumor antigen stat is a simple and fast one-step immunochromatographic assay for the detection of bladder tumor-associated antigen in urine.

Objectives: To evaluate the BTA[1] stat in non-bladder cancer patients in order to identify the categories contributing to its low specificity.

Methods: A single voided urine sample was collected from 45 patients treated in the urology clinic for conditions not related to bladder cancer. Each urine sample was examined by BTA stat test and cytology.

Results: The overall specificity of the BTA stat test was 44%, which was significantly lower than that of urine cytology, 90%. The false positive rates for BTA stat test vary among the different clinical categories, being highest in cases of urinary tract calculi (90%), and benign prostatic hypertrophy (73%). Exclusion of these categories from data analysis improved BTA stat specificity to 66%.

Conclusions: Clinical categories contributing to low BTA stat specificity can be identified, and their exclusion improves the specificity of this test.






[1] BTA = bladder tumor antigen


January 2001
Ofer Nativ MD, Edmond Sabo MD, Ralph Madeb MSc, Sarel Halachmi MD, Shahar Madjar MD and Boaz Moskovitz MD

Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of using combined clinical and histomorphometric features to construct a prognostic score for the individual patient with localized renal cell carcinoma.

Patients and Methods: We studied 39 patients with pT1 and pT2 RCC who underwent radical nephrectomy between 1974 and 1983. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the association between various prognostic features and patient survival.

Results: The most important and independent predictors of survival were tumor angiogenesis (P=0.009), nuclear DNA ploidy (P=0.0071), mean nuclear area (P=0.013), and mean elongation factor (P=0.0346). Combination of these variables enabled prediction of outcome for the individual patient at a sensitivity and specificity of 78% and 89% respectively.

Conclusion: Our results indicate that no single parameter can accurately predict the outcome for patients with localized RCC. Combination of neovascularity, DNA content and morphometric shape descriptors enabled a more precise stratification of the patients into different risk categories.
 

December 2000
Ofer Nativ MD, Edmond Sabo MD, Moshe Wald MD, Sarel Halachmi MD and Boaz Moskovitz MD

Background: The free-to-total prostate-specificantigen ratio is the best marker for optimizing prostate cancer detection. The main problem with studies of percent free PSA is the variability of reported cutoff values.

Objectives: To evaluate the influence of prostate size on the ratio of free to total PSA.

Methods: The study group included 58 patients (mean age 66.4 years) with clinically localized prostate cancer treated surgically at our institution. Total PSA and free PSA levels were measured by a solid phase enzyme immunoassay test (Hoffman-La Roche, Basel, Switzerland). The percent free PSA was compared with prostate size as determined from the surgical specimen.

Results: A direct relation was noted between prostate size and the percent free PSA value (r=0.49, P=0.0001). Mean percentage free PSA was 9%0.004 in men with normal-sized gland while in men with large prostate (60 g) the average percent free PSA was 15.90.09 (P=0.001).

Conclusions: In patients with prostate cancer the percent free PSA level is influenced by the gland size. The larger the prostate the higher the proportion of the free PSA. Such information may have influence on the recommendation for prostate biopsy in screening programs for early detection of prostate cancer.

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