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עמוד בית
Tue, 16.07.24

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February 2022
Moshe Gips MD, Jose Bendahan MD, Shlomo Ayalon MD, Yigal Efrati MD, Moshe Simha MD, and Dov Estlein MD

Background: Pilonidal disease in the natal cleft is treated traditionally by a wide and deep excision of the affected area. There is growing awareness, however, to the advantages of minimally invasive surgeries.

Objectives: To compare the efficacy of wide excision operations and minimal trephine surgery in patients with primary pilonidal disease.

Methods: In this retrospective study we examined surgical and inpatient records of 2039 patients who underwent surgery for primary pilonidal disease in five private hospitals between 2009 and 2012. Most procedures were of lay-open, primary midline closure, and minimal surgery types. Pilonidal recurrence rates were evaluated in a subset of 1260 patients operated by 53 surgeons each performing one type of surgery, regardless of patient characteristics or disease severity.

Results: With a mean follow-up of 7.2 years, 81.5%, 85%, and 88% of patients were disease-free after minimally invasive surgery, wide excision with primary closure, and lay-open surgery, respectively, with no statistically significant difference in recurrence rates. Minimal surgeries were usually performed under local anesthesia and involved lower pain levels, less need for analgesics, and shorter hospital stays than wide excision operations, which were normally performed under general anesthesia. The use of drainage, antibiotics, or methylene blue had no effect on recurrence of pilonidal disease.

Conclusions: Minimally invasive surgeries have the advantage of reducing the extent of surgical injury and preserving patient’s quality of life. They should be the treatment of choice for primary pilonidal disease

February 2020
Moti Harats MD, Josef Haik MD MPH, Michelle Cleary RN, PhD, Ilan Vashurin MD, Uri Aviv MD and Rachel Kornhaber RN PhD

Background: Rapid and selective bromelain-based enzymatic debridement provides a non-surgical alternative for the eschar removal in deep burns, which allows for early debridement of large surface areas, accurate evaluation of burn and wound depth, and the need for skin grafting.

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of application of a bromelain-based selective enzymatic debridement (Nexobrid®) beyond the manufacturer’s guidelines for use in burns > 48 hours as well as chemical, electrical, and pediatric burns, and chronic wounds

Methods: This retrospective review included records collected between January 2017 and April 2019, from male and female patients aged 8 months to 99 years with deep burns or wounds treated with bromelain-based selective enzymatic debridement.

Results: Of the 33 patients who received the bromelain-based selective enzymatic debridement agent beyond the manufacturer’s guidelines, 25 (76%) were observed to have successful debridement of the eschar, 8 (24%) were observed to have little effect on the burn eschar. Sixteen required further surgery after debridement. Clinical data on the use of bromelain-based selective enzymatic debridement agents are limited, but these results suggest the capacity to effectively debride burns > 48 hours (late presentation burns), use for pediatrics and for chemical and electrical burns, and apply to hard to heal full thickness chronic wounds.

Conclusions: Bromelain-based selective enzymatic debridement was found to be an effective treatment modality beyond the recommended guidelines including late presentation burns and chronic wounds. This debridement method warrants further consideration when making clinical decisions concerning burn and wound care.

September 2018
Shachar Naor MD DVM, Osnat Sher MD, Galia Grisaru-Soen MD, Dror Levin MD, Ronit Elhasid MD, Yuval Geffen MD, Dov Hershkovitz MD PhD and Asaf Aizic MD
July 2018
Tima Davidson, Michal M. Ravid, Ella Nissan, Mirriam Sklair-Levy, Johnatan Nissan and Bar Chikman

Background: When a breast lesion is suspected based on a physical exam, mammography, or ultrasound, a stereotactic core needle biopsy (CNB) is usually performed to help establish a definitive diagnosis. CNBs are far less invasive than excisional biopsies, with no need for general anesthetics or hospitalization, and no recovery period. However, since only samples of the mass are removed in a CNB and not the whole mass, sampling errors can occur.

Objectives: To compare the degree of agreement between the pathological data from CNBs and excisional biopsies from a single tertiary referral hospital.

Methods: The concordance of pathological data was compared in patients who underwent CNBs and had their surgical procedures at the same medical center.

Results: From the 894 patients who underwent CNBs, 254 (28.4%) underwent subsequent excisional biopsies at our medical center. From the total of 894 patients, 227 (25.3%) who underwent a CNB were diagnosed with a malignancy, with the rest of the CNBs being diagnosed as benign pathologies. The pathological findings in the CNBs and in the excisional biopsies concurred in 232/254 (91.3%) of the cases.

Conclusions: A CNB to confirm mammographic or clinical findings of breast lesions is an accurate method to establish a pathological diagnosis of breast lesions. The accuracy is higher for invasive carcinomas than for non-invasive cancers. Excisional biopsies are necessary for lesions with anticipated sampling errors or when the core needle biopsy findings are discordant with clinical or mammographic findings.

August 2013
R. Somech, A. Lev, A.J. Simon, D. Korn, B.Z. Garty, N. Amariglio, G. Rechavi, S. Almashanu, J. Zlotogora and A. Etzioni
 Background: Enumeration of T cell receptor excision circles (TREC) was recently adopted as a neonatal screening assay for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Enumeration of kappa-deleting recombination excision circle (KREC) copy numbers can be similarly used for early assessment of B cell lymphopenia.

Objective: To assess the ability of TREC and KREC counts to identify patients with combined T and B cell immunodeficiency in a pilot study in Israel.

Methods: We studied seven children born in Israel during the years 2010–2011 and later diagnosed with SCID, and an additional patient with pure B cell immunodeficiency. TREC and KREC in peripheral blood upon diagnosis and in their neonatal Guthrie cards were analyzed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, as were Guthrie cards with dried blood spots from healthy newborns and from normal and SCID-like controls.

Results: The first features suggestive of SCID presented at age 3.1 ± 2.4 months in all patients. Yet, the diagnosis was made 4.1 ± 2.9 months later. Their TREC were undetectable or significantly low at their clinical diagnosis and in their originally stored Guthrie cards, irrespective of the amount of their circulating T cells. KREC were undetectable in six SCID patients who displayed B cell lymphopenia in addition to T cell lymphopenia. KREC were also undetectable in one patient with pure B cell immunodeficiency.

Conclusions: TREC and KREC quantification are useful screening tests for severe T and B cell immunodeficiency. Implementation of these tests is highly important especially in countries such as Israel where a high frequency of consanguinity is known to exist. 

August 2011
D. Rosin, A. Lebedyev, D. Urban, D. Aderka, O. Zmora, M. Khaikin, A. Hoffman, M. Shabtai and A. Ayalon

Background: The treatment of rectal cancer has changed significantly over the last few decades. Advanced surgical techniques have led to an increase in the rate of sphincter-preserving operations, even for low rectal tumors. This was facilitated by preoperative oncologic treatment and the use of chemoradiation to downstage the tumor before resection. The introduction of total mesorectal excision further improved the oncologic outcome and became the standard of care. The use of laparoscopy for rectal resection is the most recent addition to this series of improvements, but in contrast to the use of laparoscopy in colon cancer its role is not yet well defined.

Objectives: To present our experience with laparoscopic surgery for upper and lower rectal tumors.

Methods: A database was used to prospectively collect all data on laparoscopic rectal surgery in our department since we started performing these procedures in 1997. Follow-up data were collected from outpatient clinic visits, oncology files and telephone interviews. Updated survival data were retrieved from the national census.

Results: Of 750 laparoscopic colorectal procedures performed over a 13 year period, 67 were for rectal cancer. Of these, 29 were resections for tumors in the upper rectum (1115 cm from the anal verge) and 38 for tumors at 10 cm or below. Surgery was performed in 24 patients after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. There were 54 sphincter-preserving operations and 13 abdominoperineal resections. The mean operative time was 283 minutes. Conversion to an open procedure was required in 22% of the cases. Anastomotic leaks occurred in 17% of cases. Postoperative mortality was 4.5%. Long-term follow-up was available for 77% of the group, for a mean period of 42 months. Local recurrence was diagnosed in 4.5% of the patients and overall 5 year survival was 68%.

Conclusions: Laparoscopic rectal resection is a demanding procedure. However, laparoscopy may become the preferred approach since it is a minimally invasive procedure and has an acceptable oncologic outcome that is comparable to the open approach. This conclusion, however, needs further validation.
 

June 2004
M. Carmon, L. Rivkin, R. Abu-Dalo, M. Goldberg, I. Hadas, I. Zagal, S. Strano, A. Fisher and O. Lernau

Background: Major efforts are being directed at the early diagnosis of breast cancer. The diagnosis rate of non-palpable tumors is steadily growing as a result of increased screening by mammography. In most patients with non-palpable lesions, percutaneous image-guided biopsies have replaced wire localization with surgical excision for obtaining tissue diagnosis. In recent years the Israel Ministry of Health initiated a mammograpy screening program. Percutaneous image-guided biopsies have also become widely available.

Objective: To assess the impact of these changes on breast cancer surgical treatment in our hospital.

Methods: The charts of 483 patients operated on in our department for primary breast carcinoma during the years 1997 to mid-2001 were reviewed. Data on the mode of diagnosis, tumor stage, resection margins, and number and types of operations were recorded and analyzed. The term non-palpable tumors relates to tumors necessitating wire localization for surgical excision.

Results: The percentage of patients diagnosed with non-palpable tumors rose from 16.2% in 1997 to 47.4% in 2001, with an average size of 2.6 cm for palpable and 1.7 cm for non-palpable tumors. The rate of preoperative diagnosis for non-palpable tumors rose from 6.2% in 1997 to 96.4% in 2001. The rate of involved or very close margins was reduced by 73% in the patient group diagnosed preoperatively as compared to those without a preoperative diagnosis (10.6% vs. 39.4%). Finally, the percentage of patients who had two operations fell from 56.2% in 1997 to 11.1% in 2001.

Conclusions: The mammography screening program in Jerusalem in 1997–2001 was effective in increasing the relative percentage of non-palpable breast cancers with reduced tumor size at diagnosis. The improved availability of preoperative tissue diagnosis in these patients reduced the number of surgical procedures needed.

December 2002
David Varssano MD, Adi Michaeli-Cohen MD and Anat Loewenstein MD

Background: Pterygium is a common disease in Israel. Different surgical techniques are used to manage it with varying degrees of success.

Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a conjunctival autograft after excision of pterygium.

Methods: Excision followed by conjunctival autograft was used to treat 40 eyes of 40 patients with pterygium. The surgical results were evaluated retrospectively. Follow-up continued for a median of 296 days (range 6±1,056); 26 cases were followed for more than 100 days (average 418 days) and comprised the study cohort. All reported procedures were performed consequentially and by one surgeon in the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Israel between 1 June 1997 and 31 March 2000.

Results: There were two recurrences of pterygium (2/26, 7.7%) 2 months postoperatively. There were no major complications. Super-ficial corneal vessels (without concurrent fibrosis) appeared in 10 of 17 cases sutured with nylon, but none occurred in any of the seven grafts sutured with vicryl (P = 0.068). The average LogMAR-corrected visual acuity of the study group improved slightly, from 6/16.5 to 6/11 (P = 0.003).

Conclusions: Excision of pterygium with a conjunctival autograft is a safe and effective operation, with no procedure-specific added surgical risks. The relatively long surgical time and microsurgical methods required to perform the procedure properly have hindered its acceptance as the mainstream approach to pterygium management. Long-term follow-up is needed for better discernment of the surgical results in Israel.
 

Davut Keskin MD, Naci Ezirmik MD and Hakan CË elik MD

Background: Familial multiple lipomatosis is an extremely rare disease. The disease usually does not affect the daily life of FML victims, but they may experience difficulty in performing everyday physical tasks if the lipomas are multiple and large. Inheritance is frequently by autosomal dominant transmission, although cases with recessive inheritance have also been reported.

Objectives: To determine the pattern of inheritance of the disease in a family with 83 members spanning three generations.

Methods: A complete family analysis was performed and all surviving members of the family were examined. Laboratory investiga-tions were conducted in those with FML, including serum lipid, cholesterol and glucose levels, white blood cell count, hemoglobin, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and renal and hepatic function tests.

Results: There were no consanguineous relationships between spouses in the family. The disease was first seen on the neck of the (male) index patient. This patient had 4 sons, 8 daughters and 60 grandchildren. The disease was established in four of his daughters and two of his sons. One of the female grandchildren whose mother has the disease was also affected. The laboratory findings were normal for all patients.

Conclusion: Our findings showed that a) the disease is transmitted by the autosomal dominant route of inheritance; and b) lipomas observed at an early age may be numerous and large, may diffuse, and sometimes have to be excised surgically.
 

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